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View Full Version : Germanic Communities in South America?



flieger
Tuesday, April 12th, 2011, 02:40 AM
Does anyone know if there are any Germanic settlements or towns in South America that have retained their character? The reason for asking is: looking for a retirement destination, with the potential for a good climate and low cost of living.

TheBlackCross
Tuesday, April 12th, 2011, 04:00 AM
Argentina is mostly European descendant but I don't know exactly who immigrated there.

Brazil is predominately German in the south but only in the south however there are still some browns and blacks but those a very rare.

Some regions still speak Pommersch such as Pomerode. Other very German cities include Brusque, Blumenau and Presidente Nereu in Santa Catarina State.

In the Rio Grande do Sul State there is Candido Godoi which is considered the "World Capital of Twin births" and it is strictly German.
Other cities in the same state include Santa Maria and Gramado.

So you've got some options there. I Hope that helps ;)

RonanHanns
Tuesday, April 12th, 2011, 09:21 PM
The south of Brazil is completly European. Most of Italian and Germans immigration.

Gramado/Rio grande do sul
http://www.imagensgratis.com.br/imagens/original/imagem-gramado.jpg

Canela/Rio Grande do Sul
http://www.afhic.org/encontro2010-p_arquivos/canela-rs.jpg

Blumenau/ Santa Catarina
http://www.mundotecno.info/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/blumenau.jpg

some Brazilian famous people of the south...

Rodrigo Hilbert
http://www.meionorte.com/imagens/2008/04/17/rodrigo%20hilbert.jpg

Gisele Bundchen
http://www.efuxico.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/gisele-bundchen.jpg

Schwanengesang
Tuesday, April 12th, 2011, 10:09 PM
Argentina is mostly European descendant but I don't know exactly who immigrated there.

Brazil is predominately German in the south but only in the south however there are still some browns and blacks but those a very rare.

Some regions still speak Pommersch such as Pomerode. Other very German cities include Brusque, Blumenau and Presidente Nereu in Santa Catarina State.

In the Rio Grande do Sul State there is Candido Godoi which is considered the "World Capital of Twin births" and it is strictly German.
Other cities in the same state include Santa Maria and Gramado.

So you've got some options there. I Hope that helps ;)

I LOL'd hard at NY Times saying that the high incidence of twins was due to inbreeding and that to correct it, the town should open its doors to "non Germanic" people. Which is funny as hell, since most people living on those colonies has never even seen a black person.
I remember Blumenau vividly. It's still very pretty, so is Brusque. But those have got some "browns" now. Fortunately, the "colonos" don't like them, don't give them jobs, etc. It's funny.

As for Pres. Nereu, it's about 20% Polish and 80% German. Pomerode is 100% German.

If anyone goes to the small colonies, such as Rio do Sul, Pomerode, etc, expect to be greeted by people who do not speak English, only old German dialects from the 1800 and broken Portuguese.

Such as:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlyogRlKNks&

(this is in the State of Espirito Santo. They're interviewing some people in a colony where no one speaks portuguese)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TzFWrOZ3oM&

(little kid called Andre Baltz speaking the dialect - SO CUTE)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r49hjnWNUGk&

(Santa Maria de Jetibá - 60% Pomeranian - State of Espírito Santo, they're making a show about Pomeranian immigration...unfortunately, there are some browns there)

Those people are BIG on keeping their Germanic heritage. They don't like foreigners (from their own country) very much.

Pomeranian is now a recognized state language in various state of Brazil.

Hilderinc
Tuesday, April 12th, 2011, 10:20 PM
Does anyone know if there are any Germanic settlements or towns in South America that have retained their character?

From things I've read, there are few German settlements in South America that have retained their [I]cultural character. Although, the examples below seem to show that there has been a high level of cultural retention.



The Centro Argentino Cultural Wolgadeutsche (http://www.cacw.com.ar/sitio/portada.php) (C.A.C.W.) estimates that there were 2 million people of Volga German ancestry living in Argentina as of 2007. Many of these people now live in the larger towns and cities of Argentina.

http://cvgs.cu-portland.edu/immigration/Argentina.cfm



Germans today make up the third largest group in Argentina with well over two million Volga Germans alone.[1 (http://www.cacw.com.ar/sitio/notas_detalle.php?id=NTk=)]

German-language newspapers, including the Argentinisches Tageblatt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argentinisches_Tageblatt) (Argentine Daily) were created. The 5 most populous provinces of descendants of Germans, are in order: Córdoba, Entre Ríos, Buenos Aires, Misiones and La Pampa.

Today, most German Argentines do not speak German at home because of the decline of the language; however, as over 1.8 million Argentines of non-German descent do, it has become a language heard all over the country, due to the many businesses started by German-Argentines and Germans alike. For this reason, it has also become an important business language: it is currently the fifth most spoken language in Argentina.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Argentine

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/86/San_Jose1.JPG
Flags of Argentina, Buenos Aires Province and Germany in front of St. Joseph Catholic Church in San José, Coronel Suárez Partido (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coronel_Suárez_Partido), Argentina. Coronel Suárez Partido has a population of 37,000, primarily of Volga German descent.

The city of Crespo, Entre Ríos (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crespo,_Entre_Ríos) has a population of 18,000, primarily of Volga Germans.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8c/Bariloche_01.jpg/800px-Bariloche_01.jpg
Swiss Chalet architecture of San Carlos de Bariloche (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Carlos_de_Bariloche). In the 1930s the centre of the city was built to have the appearance of an alpine town ("Little Switzerland") with many buildings made of wood and stone.


German colonies in Argentina (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Argentine#German_colonies_in_Arge ntina)
Figures of German Argentines (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Argentine#Figures)
Population by Reigion of German descent in Argentina (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Argentine#Population_by_Region_of _German_descent_in_Argentina)



There is also list (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethnic_German#Latin_America) of some major settlements of Germans in every South American nation.

RonanHanns
Wednesday, April 13th, 2011, 06:45 PM
There's Penedo too, a Finnish community around Rio de Janeiro.

http://turismo.culturamix.com/blog/wp-content/gallery/fotos-de-penedo/fotos-de-penedo-1.jpg

pteridos
Wednesday, April 13th, 2011, 10:32 PM
In Rio Grande do Sul, southernmost State, German settlement started in 1825-1826, in São Leopoldo, ca 30. km from Porto Alegre. From there it expanded to Novo Hamburgo, and hinterland, extendinding to São Vedelino, Taquara, and up to the highlands, Nova Petropolis, Gramado & Canela. Many immigrants from the Hunsrück region, so that in some rural areas a dialect derived from the Hunsrück with ca. 40% germanized portuguese words is still "lingua franca" in many households. Other regions received Westphalians (ex. Nova Westfália). Soon, more land was needed, and settlement projects started out, some Protestant, some Catholic, run by private entrepreneurs. The settlement area expanded somewhat to the south but mainly noth-west, running into the State of Sata Catarina (where German settlents already existed in the coatal areas ex. Rio Negro, Blumenau, Pomerode, Itajaí). Different waves of immigrants presented distinct cultural backgrounds and sometimes integration was not easy. Brazil being a Catholic country, offered better conditions for the integration of Catholic settlers, while there was a stronger isolation of the Protestant communities. Although freedom of religion was guaranteed to the immigrants, some aspects presented difficulties (example, protestants could not be burried in catholic cemiteries in some regions).
In the 1940´s Brazil joined the Allies and Germans (including their descendants) treated with suspicion... it was forbidden to speak German in public places, german schools were closed or placed into intervention of brazilian authorities. This was a major setback for German culture, many young people under this kind of pressure refused to keep regional culture and language... To a certain extent, there was a comeback of the interest in the culture and language, together with the presence of major German enterprises (Volkswagen, Mercedes), and also some successfull companies started out by immigrants (ex. Gerdau - that became a multinational entreprise - including ownership of Americansteel...).

Hilderinc
Wednesday, April 13th, 2011, 11:05 PM
There's Penedo too, a Finnish community around Rio de Janeiro.

Finns aren't Germanic, though. ;)



-----



Welcome to the forum, pteridos. Are the German settlements relatively isolated, or is there a general 'German element' to most places?

RonanHanns
Thursday, April 14th, 2011, 12:34 AM
ok, but Penedo is a beautiful place where our friend perhaps can feel at home ;)

pteridos
Thursday, April 14th, 2011, 06:50 PM
The first settlements by German immigrants created the basis for a regional "German element", in this radius of ca. 100 km around São Leopoldo. In the 1860´s Italian settlers came. So, for exemple, the town of São Vedelino is the limit of the German settlements in that direction, and from there inland the Italian element predominates,for another 100-120 km.

With new settlement projects, isolated (sencond and third generation) settlements sprung up, in the hinterland, where the portuguese-açorian and the original native populations provided the general cultural background (this for the State of Rio Grande do Sul).

I have only few informations on the German settlements in the Sates of Santa Catarina and Espirito Santo. As for the State of São Paulo, although two german colonies were reported (Santo Amaro, nowadays a discrict of the São Paulo municipality - and Itapecerica da Serra - ca. 20 km from São Paulo) most immigrants were rapidly assimilated, especially with the industrialization. German clubs and Schulvereine, Singvereine and Schützenvereine existed troughout these areas. As mentioned before the 1940´s put an end to many these cultural activities.

There are some good studies on the assimilation of the German settlers: ex. EmilioWillems - Aculturação dos alemães no Brasil.

In São Leopoldo, the Editorial House Rottermund was very important, producing schoolbooks and "Jahrbücher" in German. There were two German newspapers in Rio Grande do Sul, and for sure some also in the State of Santa Catarina. São Paulo until the 1950´s had a daily Deutsche Nachriten. Nowadays, so far I know, there is only the Brasil Post - a weekly newspaper published in São Paulo.

pteridos
Thursday, April 14th, 2011, 07:04 PM
One aspect that has to be remembered, is that the Germanic culture in these regions and old immigrant settlements, is in some aspects a "frozen" relict, transplanted from different regions in Europe, and evolving in isolation under influence of the new surrounding cultural matrix. That applies not only to the language but also as to the "Weltanschaung". Just one factor for example: two world wars, had quite distinct consequences in the European germanic populations and the surving cultural aspects of immigrant settlements.