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+Suomut+
Thursday, April 7th, 2011, 02:27 AM
Post your comparisons and contrasts between Frisian and English, linguistically-speaking.

I'll start from this post: http://forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=1075806&postcount=38 ...@ Sybren:

[Praat:] It means 'speak'. So 'Praat mar Frysk' roughly translates in 'Please speak Frisian', but not in a demanding or even asking tone, more in a 'you can if you want' kind of way.When you clued me in on 'speak,' I immediately thought of the Eng. word 'prattle' (to chatter), which is also akin to (Eng.) 'prate' (to chatter); but the former apparently came into modern Eng. from modern Plattdüütsch and the later came into Eng. from Middelnederlands ; so neither of these modern Eng. terms descend from Anglo-Saxon (Old English)--I discovered this perusing my A.-S. dictionary. This has me speculating that these cognate terms like 'Praat' , 'prattle' , 'prate' , et al. may also be truly indigenously alien to continental Ooldsassisch as well. If this is valid, then the prime and likely Germanic root for such words it seems to me are FRISIAN/FRYSK...any thoughts? :) I don't suppose an Aldfrysk dictionary would help us in this conjecture. (:-\

'Klei' means 'Clay', i actually accidentally wrote the Dutch word 'Klei', in Frisian it is 'Klaai'. This points to the type of ground in the north and western areas of Fryslân. When a Frisian is born in the areas of Fryslân that has a clay soil, we say this: 'hy/sy is út 'e klaai lutsen', which means 'he/she is pulled from the clay' :P
The soil in the Fryske Wâlden does not consist of clay, but rather 'Sân' (Sand) and 'Vean' (Peat).Ahhh, well the Dutch 'Klei' is harder for an Englishman to read/understand than the Frisian 'Klaai'...no doubt about that from an English perspective. That sentence is relatively easy for an Eng. to understand...both written and spoken except the 'lutsen' part, that's very alien to modern Eng., but the A.-S. 'lutan' (to bend/stoop/decline/bow-down) just might be its cognate, although the meanings are basically opposite to each other--no mod. Eng. words stem from this word, i.e., it's 'dead.'

Question: does the Frysk 'sy' sound like the Eng. 'she' too (with the 'sh' sound or like the 'sch' sound auf deutsch)?

Thank you for your posts ;) You are actually helping in making a Frisian sub-section more feasible with asking these questions :) Your enthousiasm in your posts is great by the way!!You're very welcome dude, and ja, it's true it was all apart of my 'grand design!', LOL! ;) :D Hey, thanks...I'll just blame my enthusiasm on the "Frisian-in-me," hehe. :thumbup

Northumbria
Sunday, January 8th, 2012, 04:41 PM
Praat

:D In Northern England we have "Prat" and "Pillock" which refer to some idiot, usually someone who's just do something very stupid.


Ahhh, well the Dutch 'Klei' is harder for an Englishman to read/understand than the Frisian 'Klaai'...no doubt about that from an English perspective.

Yes, the Frisian one sounds closer the way I construct it.


The soil in the Fryske Wâlden does not consist of clay, but rather 'Sân' (Sand) and 'Vean' (Peat).

'Wâlden' - related to the term "Wolds" in some parts of England I presume, an archaic word for low hills I think, such as the Lincolnshire wolds.

'Sân' is very close to sand but I can't think of any alternative word for 'Peat' which sounds like 'Vean', all I get is 'Rain' and that is if I'm constructing it right.

+Suomut+
Monday, January 9th, 2012, 03:06 PM
:D In Northern England we have "Prat" and "Pillock" which refer to some idiot, usually someone who's just do something very stupid.I'm aware of "prat" on your side of the Atlantic, although surely 90%+ of all Eng.-speaking Americans have no clue about it. ;) Hey, consider also in connection to this that it is quite common for idiots to run their mouths a lot--thus these "p-word" connections to speaking and idiocy. :wsg
'Wâlden' - related to the term "Wolds" in some parts of England I presume, an archaic word for low hills I think, such as the Lincolnshire wolds.This is an excellent point indeed, I'd overlooked "wolds," which has as you state long ago fallen out of general use, and herein America it is never or almost never used or encountered.
'Sân' is very close to sand but I can't think of any alternative word for 'Peat' which sounds like 'Vean', all I get is 'Rain' and that is if I'm constructing it right.Aye, 'Sân' and 'sand' are almost mirror images of each other, and I can't dig up any English connections to 'Vean' either whether consulting a modern Eng. dictionary or my Ang.-Sax. one (and since there is, apparently, only ONE known "v" word among A.-S. diction--so one has to consult the "w" words). I know one can be tempted into thinking 'vein' as in 'vein of gold' might be somehow cognate to 'Vean,' but the former is, I think, without question of Latin-root. I now wonder just what the Plattdüütsch dictionaries have to write/say about 'Vean' or 'Vean'-connections...if anything.

Again...great reply/post, Northumbria. :thumbup :)

Sybren
Monday, January 9th, 2012, 04:15 PM
Sorry guys. I now see i made a mistake. It's not 'vean', but 'fean'.

You should think i would know how to correctly write something like this, but Frisians don't use written Frisian very much.

'Fean' also isn't pronounced with the 'ea' like in 'Peat', but with the 'ea' like in 'ear'.

'Praten' also comes back in Swedish 'Pratar'. Strangely this isn't seen in Norwegian (instead: 'Snakker').


I don't think 'wâlden' has to do with low hills. There are no low hills in the wâlden area and i don't think there were. It just means 'woods' i guess, after the woods that once were located around there, but are now gone.

Fun fact: At my work we have one Frisian from the Wâlden. His accent and differing use of words are often made fun of by us 'Clay-Frisians', which are the true Frisians :P

Þoreiðar
Monday, January 9th, 2012, 04:35 PM
'Praten' also comes back in Swedish 'Pratar'. Strangely this isn't seen in Norwegian (instead: 'Snakker')Joda, vi prater vi også. :)

velvet
Monday, January 9th, 2012, 05:32 PM
If it's "fean", it reminds of "fen" (marshlands /moors / costal wet regions), which also is already used with the spelling "fen" in Old Icelandic (Eddaic times), in German "Fenn" (moore; peat-moore), pl. Fenns.



'Praten' also comes back in Swedish 'Pratar'. Strangely this isn't seen in Norwegian (instead: 'Snakker')

German Platt knows "schnacken" for chatting, also in more northern regions spelled "snacken". :)

Northumbria
Monday, January 9th, 2012, 06:13 PM
I'm aware of "prat" on your side of the Atlantic, although surely 90%+ of all Eng.-speaking Americans have no clue about it. ;)

Yeah, I thought as much too. There's a few words which are absent from different version of English or have totally different meanings.


Hey, consider also in connection to this that it is quite common for idiots to run their mouths a lot--thus these "p-word" connections to speaking and idiocy. :wsg

Hmm, I hadn't considered that but now that you mention it... :)


Again...great reply/post, Northumbria. :thumbup :)

Thanks.


'Fean' also isn't pronounced with the 'ea' like in 'Peat', but with the 'ea' like in 'ear'.

I can't think of any similar words yet, I've just been going through descriptions of soil in my head - peat, loam, clay, etc. Nothing seems to match so far, the most I got was 'Fell' but it describes a high hill or mountain and doesn't really sound the same - it's North Germanic.


I don't think 'wâlden' has to do with low hills. There are no low hills in the wâlden area and i don't think there were. It just means 'woods' i guess, after the woods that once were located around there, but are now gone.

I was trying to think yesterday, I kept thinking I'd heard that name somewhere before and it just occurred to me - there's places in Southern England called 'Wealden' and there's also the word 'Wooden' (something made from wood).


The name "Weald" is derived from the Old English weald, meaning "forest" (cognate, German Wald). This comes from a Germanic root of the same meaning, and ultimately from Indo-European. Weald is a specifically a West Saxon form; wold is the Anglian form of the word.
...
The adjective for "weald" is "wealden".


The Weald is in South East England in the areas inhabited by the Jutes and Saxons. The Lincolnshire Wolds are Anglian country, the word must have taken a slightly different meaning there or perhaps the hills were once wooded like the Weald.

For 'Wolds' I got:



1.
an elevated tract of open country.
2.
Often, wolds. an open, hilly district, especially in England, as in Yorkshire or Lincolnshire.


before 900; Middle English; Old English w ( e ) ald forest; cognate with German Wald; akin to wild, Old Norse vǫllr plain

So the Lincolnshire Wolds could have been wooded once. The Old Norse description which refers to a plain though, but the wolds are low hills. I suppose once the trees were cut down people forgot what it referred to.


If it's "fean", it reminds of "fen" (marshlands /moors / costal wet regions), which also is already used with the spelling "fen" in Old Icelandic (Eddaic times), in German "Fenn" (moore; peat-moore), pl. Fenns.

I hadn't thought of that. :thumbup That sounds like a great explanation, there's a few Fens in England, especially a large area in Lincolnshire, Cambridgeshire and Norfolk just called "The Fens".
It was a former marsh land with the settlements built on hills, it was drained by Dutch engineers and has very fertile peat soils.

Northumbria
Monday, January 9th, 2012, 06:54 PM
England has many different names for the same thing derived from different variants of North and West Germanic languages.

In my part of the country I can't think of anywhere called 'Weald' or 'Wold', there's a massive difference between place names in the North and South and lesser so East and West.



Sybren, do any of these place name elements see similar to Frisian ones?


A few Old English place name elements:



Modern English version is in brackets ()

-burna (-borne) a brook, stream

-burh (-burg / -bury / -burgh) a fortified place, castle

-broc (-brook) a brook or stream

-brycg (-bridge) a bridge

-cot a cottage

-den a valley

-dun a hill or down

-eg (later -ey) an island or raised ground surrounded by marsh

-feld (-field) open space later a field

-ford a river ford

-halh a nook, corner of land

-ham a homestead

-hamm an enclosure, water-meadow

-hrycg (-ridge) a ridge

-hyrst a wooded hill

-hyll (-hill) a hill

-ingas (-ing) the people of ...

-leah (-ley) a woodland clearing

-mer (-mere) a lake

-mutha (-mouth) a river mouth or estuary

-stede (-stead) a place, site of a building

-tun (-ton) an enclosure, farmstead, estate

-wella (-well) a spring or stream

-wic (-wich) Romano-British settlement

-wick produce (of a farm, particularly dairy)

-worth an enclosure, homestead


I've seen 'meer', 'burg' and 'den' in Northern Europe.

Viking place name elements:



Modern English version is in brackets ()

-bekkr (-beck) a farmstead or settlement, then a village

-by a farmstead or settlement, then a village

-dalr (-dale) a dale, valley

-ey an island

-gathr (-garth) a yard, open space

-gil a ravine

-holmr (-holm) flat ground by a river

-kirkja (-kirk) a church hence Scots kirk

-lundr (-lund) a grove

-nes (-ness) promomntory, headland

-thorp an outlying farmstead or hamlet

-thveit (-thwaite) a meadow

-toft a site of a house and outbuildings, a plot of land, a homestead

-vithr a wood


There's also many ways to name a stream, a few in Northern England are 'beck' (Old Norse), 'burn' and 'brook' (Old English) and there's also a few others in the South I believe.

Then there's a few different names for hills, one very local to the South Pennines is 'Low' which is ironic considering 'Low' in standard English refers to something not very high.

Then there's also a local name for a stream in a deep ravine - 'Clough', pronounced somewhere between 'cliff' and 'cluff' - it is better if you hear it.

Sybren
Monday, January 9th, 2012, 09:08 PM
The name "Weald" is derived from the Old English weald, meaning "forest" (cognate, German Wald). This comes from a Germanic root of the same meaning, and ultimately from Indo-European. Weald is a specifically a West Saxon form; wold is the Anglian form of the word.
...
The adjective for "weald" is "wealden".
That must be it. Also, 'Wâld' is pronounced with the â sounding like English 'awe'.


Sybren, do any of these place name elements see similar to Frisian ones?
The ones i can think of:

Burh (-burg / -bury / -burgh) - Frisian: Burch
Brycg - Frisian: Brêge
Feld - Frisian: Fjild
Mer - Frisian: Mar
Stede (-stead) - Frisian: (we call a city: 'Stêd'. Pronounced similarly to English 'Stead')
Thorp - Frisian: (we call a village: 'Doarp'. In Dutch: Dorp)

Someone like Anlef probably knows a lot more.

+Suomut+
Tuesday, January 10th, 2012, 07:16 AM
Sorry guys. I now see i made a mistake. It's not 'vean', but 'fean'.When you do this, Frisian, the 'Viking' in me comes out. :rage :viking2: :sviking :lol :silly :wsg
I don't think 'wâlden' has to do with low hills. There are no low hills in the wâlden area and i don't think there were. It just means 'woods' i guess, after the woods that once were located around there, but are now gone.
I was trying to think yesterday, I kept thinking I'd heard that name somewhere before and it just occurred to me - there's places in Southern England called 'Wealden' and there's also the word 'Wooden' (something made from wood).

The Weald is in South East England in the areas inhabited by the Jutes and Saxons. The Lincolnshire Wolds are Anglian country, the word must have taken a slightly different meaning there or perhaps the hills were once wooded like the Weald.

For 'Wolds' I got:
In my part of the country I can't think of anywhere called 'Weald' or 'Wold',
That must be it. Also, 'Wâld' is pronounced with the â sounding like English 'awe'.Here's the etymology of the mod. Eng. "wold," y'all: "--> from the Middle Eng. 'wald' and 'wold' (2 different spellings apparently common) --> from the Ang.-Sax. 'weald' and 'wald' both meaning, of course 'forest' and akin to the Althochdeutsch 'wald' (forest)." In Ang.-Sax. beyond meaning 'forest' 'weald' also could mean: (of course) 'wood(s)', grove, bushes, or any kind of foliage. Northumbria aptly defines/quotes what the MODERN meaning of 'wold(s)' is in English, but in my mind it's quite sad that it NO LONGER means 'forest'/'wood(s)', because IT SHOULD, but the course of centuries has caused Eng.-speakers to 'pervert'/INVERT this term into the EXACT OPPOSITE! with a meaning like "open country" (fields) when its ORIGINAL/TRUE form/meaning is NON!-open country. :| :reyesw I don't mean this as a slight against English folks or Eng.-speakers, because I am MOSTLY ENGLISH BY 'BLOOD' (and am ELATED! to be :D ) :wsg , but this massive, opposite change in meaning was super screwed-up> (:-\

I have further commentary on some other pts. forthcoming (I've run out of time in here for the night), including on 'fen/fenn' and the Eng.-Frisian similarities/contrast between/among the mutually shared term 'burch'--thanks for pointing that one out Sybren. :thumbup :) Velvet, please reply to my query over the apparently modern Deut. (WHICH VARIETY? :P ) term 'Fenn.' :wsg ...GREAT INPUT!/REPLIES! gentlemen and lady...*Happy Tuesday!* :prost :)

Sigurd
Tuesday, January 10th, 2012, 08:55 AM
German Platt knows "schnacken" for chatting, also in more northern regions spelled "snacken". :)

English also knows "snack" which is thought to be etymologically related as euphemistic explanation for a light hearted 'tete a tete', often best had over a small meal. ;)

velvet
Tuesday, January 10th, 2012, 01:35 PM
Velvet, please reply to my query over the apparently modern Deut. (WHICH VARIETY? :P ) term 'Fenn.' :wsg ...

Duden says it is north-German (Lower Saxony, Schleswig-Holstein, Ostfriesland, MeckPomm?), but I assume that it only vanished in more inland regions due to that most moores have been artificially dried out over the last 100 years or so and thus the specific word to describe the nature of this sort of land was no longer needed.

I remember though, as a child, we had a small "Fenn" (heath moore) nearby (got dried out and some houses have been built upon...), also the city I lived in until end of last year has a protected heathland and ground water park, containing indeed peat-moores still. Heathland is a very common form of landscape up there in the north, being part moore, part peat, part "dry" (in summer), often featuring small lakes in between (quite dangerous to walk through if you dont know that form of landscape due to the moore "pits" hiding under small shrubs of heaths), the traditional lea / grazing land for Heidschnucken (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heidschnucke). Again, I remember, as a child, shepherds wandered around from one of those special heathlands to the next, because on them grew the special grasses and heaths (in German called Erika) and other plants those sheeps preferred. I eagerly awaited the shepherd arriving in spring with his small herd and those mysteriously well trained and very nice dogs guarding them.

However, some 30 years ago heathland did still exist also more inland, and in some few protected parks it still does.

One can trace the term through place names:


Spelling variants:

Fenn, Venn, Fehn, Vehn, Feen



„Fenn“


* Fenn, Naturschutzgebiet im Kreis Stendal
* Fenne, ein Ort in der Warndt-Region
* Fennsee (Wilmersdorf), ein See in Berlin
* Fennsee (Westhavelland), ein See in Brandenburg
* Fenn-See, ein See bei Damsdorf, Gemeinde Kloster Lehnin in Brandenburg
* Großes Fenn, ein Naturschutzgebiet in Berlin
* Großes Fenn, ehemaliges Sumpfgebiet in Berlin, siehe Rudolph-Wilde-Park
* Großes Fenn und Kleines Fenn, Straßen in Ferchesar, Brandenburg
* Fennberg, eine Landschaft im Südtiroler Unterland mit Ortsteilen der Gemeinden Margreid und Kurtatsch
* Fennpfuhl, ein Ortsteil im Berliner Bezirk Lichtenberg
* Fennpfuhlpark, ein Park in Berlin-Lichtenberg
* Hundekehlefenn, Naturschutzgebiet der Berliner Grunewaldseenkette
* Krummes Fenn, ein Landschaftsschutzgebiet in Berlin-Zehlendorf
* Langes Fenn, ehemaliges Gelände des künstlich angelegten Koenigssees, Berlin
* Mahlpfuhler Fenn, FFH und Naturschutzgebiet in Sachsen-Anhalt, in der Nähe von Tangerhütte, 1210ha groß.
* Moosfenn, ein Hochmoor südlich von Potsdam in der Nähe des Großen Ravensberges (Landkreis-Potsdam-Mittelmark)
* Plagefenn, Hochmoor im Biosphärenreservat Schorfheide-Chorin
* Poschfenn, Flachwassersee im Brandenburger Naturpark Nuthe-Nieplitz
* Riemeisterfenn, Naturschutzgebiet der Berliner Grunewaldseenkette
* Rundes Fenn, ehemaliges Gelände des künstlich angelegten Herthasees, Berlin
* Torffenn, ehemaliges Gelände des künstlich angelegten Hubertussees, Berlin


„Venn“

* Amtsvenn, Moorgebiet im Münsterland
* Gildehauser Venn
* Hohes Venn
* Schwarzes Venn zwischen Heiden und Maria Veen im Naturpark Hohe Mark
* Venn, Naturschutzgebiet in Emsdetten
* Venn, Stadtteil von Mönchengladbach
* Vennhausen, Stadtteil von Düsseldorf
* Venner Moor in Senden
* Weißes Venn bei Haltern im Naturpark Hohe Mark
* Zwillbrocker Venn, Naturschutzgebiet in Vreden


„Ven" / „Veen“

* Veenhusen, Ort in Ostfriesland
* Heerenveen, Ort in der nl. Provinz Friesland
* Veendam, als Siedlung von Torfstechern entstandene Stadt in den Niederlanden
* Venlo, Stadt in den Niederlanden (Toponymie unsicher)
* Veen, Dorf der Gemeinde Alpen (Gemeinde), in der Nähe von Xanten am linken Niederrhein
* Hoogeveen, Stadt in den Niederlanden
* Maria Veen, Ortsteil von Reken


„Fehn“

* Augustfehn, Ort in der Gemeinde Apen bei Oldenburg
* Beningafehn, Ortsteil der Gemeinde Hesel in Ostfriesland
* Elisabethfehn, Ort im Landkreis Cloppenburg
* Friedrichsfehn, Ort im Ammerland
* Großefehn, Ort in Ostfriesland
* Ihlowerfehn, Ort in Ostfriesland
* Jheringsfehn, Ort in Ostfriesland
* Lübbertsfehn, Ort in Ostfriesland
* Neukamperfehn, Ort in Ostfriesland
* Rhauderfehn, Ort in Ostfriesland
* Spetzerfehn, Ortsteil der Gemeinde Großefehn
* Völlenerfehn, Ort in Ostfriesland
* Warsingsfehn, Ortsteil der Gemeinde Moormerland in Ostfriesland


other spellings:

* Venusberg, Stadtteil von Bonn (Der Name leitet sich von Fenn-Berg ab, da es sich um ein ehemaliges Hochmoorgebiet handelt)
* Fensdorf, eine Gemeinde im Westerwald
* Die Fens, eine Moorlandschaft in Ostengland

(where is to note that Venus most likely does not come from Fen, but indeed from Venus, a not that uncommon name for hills/mountains going back to pre-christian times; but that's another topic, and, it wouldnt even really exclude each other since Venus is a fertility goddess and Fenns feature an almost fantastic collection of plants mostly unknown to other landscape forms; those two terms may have a deeper relation).

One can see though that the term Fen/Fenn/Venn was even known as far down as South Tyrol, just the subsequent vanishing of this form of landscape also made the term dissappear, leaving it in those regions which still have them in higher frequency, ie northern Germany.

Northumbria
Tuesday, January 10th, 2012, 03:19 PM
Here's the etymology of the mod. Eng. "wold," y'all: "--> from the Middle Eng. 'wald' and 'wold' (2 different spellings apparently common) --> from the Ang.-Sax. 'weald' and 'wald' both meaning, of course 'forest' and akin to the Althochdeutsch 'wald' (forest)." In Ang.-Sax. beyond meaning 'forest' 'weald' also could mean: (of course) 'wood(s)', grove, bushes, or any kind of foliage. Northumbria aptly defines/quotes what the MODERN meaning of 'wold(s)' is in English, but in my mind it's quite sad that it NO LONGER means 'forest'/'wood(s)', because IT SHOULD, but the course of centuries has caused Eng.-speakers to 'pervert'/INVERT this term into the EXACT OPPOSITE! with a meaning like "open country" (fields) when its ORIGINAL/TRUE form/meaning is NON!-open country. :| :reyesw I don't mean this as a slight against English folks or Eng.-speakers, because I am MOSTLY ENGLISH BY 'BLOOD' (and am ELATED! to be :D ) :wsg , but this massive, opposite change in meaning was super screwed-up> (:-\

:D 'Weald' still means wood in those areas of England where it is used, but 'Wold' is quite devoid of trees.
The Weald is actually thickly wooded by English standards. The Old Norse term which means 'plain' is very different too.

You have to remember that England isn't really a wooded country (although the hedges and hedgerow trees make it look deceptively more wooded than it actually is), there's always been good pasture or arable to be had.
Where woods do exist in England they have been coppiced (managed for renewable wood), but there are a few which have barely been touched.

More important terms in English probably describe moorland, marshland and heathland. Large areas of England were wetlands when the Anglo-Saxons arrived and generally similar to the Netherlands throughout much of the East.


Heathland is a very common form of landscape up there in the north, being part moore, part peat, part "dry" (in summer), often featuring small lakes in between (quite dangerous to walk through if you dont know that form of landscape due to the moore "pits" hiding under small shrubs of heaths), the traditional lea / grazing land for Heidschnucken.

These landscapes are quite common in England, generally Moors in the North and Heaths in the South.

A moor is usually composed of heather and a few shrubs and is in the hills, heathland has less heather and a wider variety of shrubs and wildlife. Both are quite similar though.
The wet areas where you can sink are called 'Bogs' and you can try to avoid them by looking out for cotton grass and sphagnum moss.


Again, I remember, as a child, shepherds wandered around from one of those special heathlands to the next, because on them grew the special grasses and heaths (in German called Erika)

That is quite interesting, the scientific name of Heather is 'Ericae' (something like that).
It's also interesting how both 'Erika' and 'Heather' can be used as names for names by women.


Moorland and Heathland were traditionally used for sheep grazing here too, and the trees and dead wood for fire wood and the habitat as a whole for game. Peat was also used as fuel.

Apart from farmland, moorland, heaths and marshes were always quite important habitats here. This post (http://forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=1147865&postcount=97) will give you a good idea as to how the English countryside looks, it goes from pastoral to heathland.

This post (http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?p=1148477&posted=1#post1148477) will give you a general idea of how NW Europeans utilised the landscape up until the medieval period.

Ocko
Friday, February 24th, 2012, 10:47 PM
The ending -ing denotes a clan or 'son of'

Last names like

Nanninga, Haddenga, Laninga, Etc,

Indicates the clan/Sippe

In England those clan names were used to name sites like: brytfordinga, Cystaninga (Keston in Kent). Etc.

Tom Schnadelbach
Saturday, February 25th, 2012, 07:13 AM
Might I suggest that besides writing the frisian words properly, you write, perhaps in parentheses, next to it how they would be written by an english speaker who only wrote what he heard as he would write an unknown english word without having seen it written? It would make it much easier to compare the two. I use an example. I am german. I can follow spoken dutch. But it is much harder to read it than to understand it spoken. Because the dutch and germans write even the same word in a different way. I use the example of "vrijheid". "Freiheit". The word for freedom. And even words that are slightly different when spoken. "Gezondheid", "Gesundheit", (health) It would be much more clear that "gesondheit" meant "Gesundheit" and that "freiheit" meant "Freiheit" than if you write them properly. It's probably the same with frisian/english comparisons.

Just my two cents.