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timothyshannon
Monday, April 4th, 2011, 04:53 PM
Greetings Skadi folk,

I just came across this site doing research, and had to say hello. Browsing this forum has been uplifting, to say the least. I look forward to getting to know you all.

I come here asking for your help: I am looking for a good way to trace my genealogy back at least 1,000 years, and am at a severe disadvantage. If there is a service any of you know of that is reliable and of good quality in the craft of tracing family origins, please post contact information here.

First of all, both of my parents, all of my grandparents, and anyone else I have blood relations with are all dead. They have been since I was young, and therefore I have only recently even questioned my genealogy.

However, I don't even know where I come from. Both of my parents were born in North America, and the records I have been able to find tracing my heritage are really weak. In total, I have only been able to find documentation of someone of the same last name crossing the Atlantic in a boat in 1790. I can't even connect that person to myself via any family tree.

I'd like to know if I am what I think I am. While my physical traits match that of the celto-germanic european, and I was told by my parents when I was young that I am French and Scotch-Irish, I have no proof that I am not strongly slavic, jewish, or anything else. If I am actually a descendant of the Moors, Hungarians, etc. I'd like to at least know this.

Clearly many of you here recognize the importance of answering these questions. I'd love any advice and/or resources you might have for me.

Thanks,

Tim

Oski
Monday, April 4th, 2011, 05:08 PM
www.23andme.com

timothyshannon
Monday, April 4th, 2011, 05:13 PM
www.23andme.com

Okay. This is the most amazing thing I've ever seen.

Have you actually done this?

TheBlackCross
Monday, April 4th, 2011, 06:19 PM
http://www.decodeme.com/ancestry

timothyshannon
Monday, April 4th, 2011, 07:20 PM
Hmmmm, you typically get what you pay for, but the price difference here is staggering.

23andme.com is $200 USD

decodeme.com is $2000 USD

can anyone speak from experience the quality of either?

Oski
Wednesday, April 6th, 2011, 10:48 PM
Okay. This is the most amazing thing I've ever seen.

Have you actually done this?

Yes I have.

http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=137547&page=3

Sybren
Wednesday, April 6th, 2011, 11:33 PM
Hmmmm, you typically get what you pay for, but the price difference here is staggering.

23andme.com is $200 USD

decodeme.com is $2000 USD

can anyone speak from experience the quality of either?
If you are considering 23andme, maybe it is a good idea to wait at least until April 15th, because then it will probably be DNA day at 23andme and the test will probably be half the price.

I recommend checking their site around that date. I will too :)

timothyshannon
Thursday, April 7th, 2011, 04:37 AM
Indeed! I called them, and they added me to their email list. She said I'd be notified when a sales happens, and hinted that "DNA Day" is an annual event they recognize.

I actually got lucky and was able to trade 75% of my maternal side back to England, Germany, and Bohemia as early as the mid 1500's. Progress feels good, but still tons of work to do.

TXRog
Thursday, April 7th, 2011, 07:02 AM
Nice to see another Texan on the forum.

timothyshannon
Thursday, April 7th, 2011, 02:39 PM
Nice to see another Texan on the forum.

Nice indeed! Hail!

What region of Texas do you live? I am in the DFW area.

Were you born in America? Did your family provide you with any decent genealogical data or family tree dating back to the motherland?

Hesse
Thursday, April 7th, 2011, 06:06 PM
Indeed! I called them, and they added me to their email list. She said I'd be notified when a sales happens, and hinted that "DNA Day" is an annual event they recognize.


Were you actually able to call 23and me? How did you get their phone number? I checked their website, and I was unable to find a number. I was thinking about calling them because I also would like to know about DNA day and be notified of the date it happens.

Wynterwade
Thursday, April 7th, 2011, 06:17 PM
Do not take a DNA test to find out your ancestors. Take a DNA test to find out interesting information about your diseases (like if you carry a trait that can cause a disease), physical traits (like I found out I have the recessive gene for blue eyes so if I married a blue eye girl we'd have 72% kids with light eyes, or I found out I have the body of a sprinter not a long distance runner etc.). All a DNA test can tell you about your ancestry is that it averages your european ancestry together and picks a spot right in the middle. My ancestry is mostly English and Southern German so it placed me in northern Germany along the Danish boarder into the Netherlands even though I have little ancestry from that region. Check out the 23andme results in the genetic section of this site.
http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=137547&page=3
(also if you didn't already know the pt-DNA and mt-DNA only trace your direct line like your mothers mothers mothers mothers mothers etc. all the way back to the Ice age and this line only comprises .000000000000000000000001% of your ancestry- so it doesn't tell you anything about your ancestry. It's just interesting to look at. Scientists use these mt- and pt- lines to determine ancient population migrations which ironically is probably more useful to you in determining who you are if you know the geographic regions your ancestors are from like London, or northern wales for example.)

What you want to do is sign up for ancestry dot com. For example during my first day using it I stared ONLY with my grandparents names and by the end of the day I'd pretty much traced my ancestry back on all lines to about 1850. Family trees are amazing and deeply connected- for example you have 32 g-g-g-grandparents, you have 256 g-g-g-g-g-g grandparents. Once you hit about 1600 you're going to have thousands. It boggles the mind. To go this far back it takes many many many hours of research. It's wildly annoying work, but once you've made a discovery it sinks in over time and makes you look at yourself in a new way. You don't even have to do any work yourself if you don't want to- just go back to about 1850 on your lines (should only take a few hours) and then check out what other people have done tracing the lines back further and copy their trees.

If you're part German once you hit the early 1800''s or mid 1700's you'll find the towns your ancestors came from. If you're English once you hit the 1600's you'll find out where your ancestors came from in Europe.

Census records are well documented back to the late 1700's in America. To go back further you WILL have some distant ancestors that share similar descendent's as you do that have already documented parts of your tree back to Europe in the 1600's or 1700's. IT is not fun going all over the country looking in churches for records or small counties all over the place- it's just too much work so I just copy what others have already researched. A few lines interested me so I ordered official documents like marriage birth and death certificates from official state sources like the Louisiana state archives.

I was told that I'm 25% English 25% Irish, 25% French and 25% Scottish ancestry but I found out it was more like 65% English 25% German (my grandparents hid this because of the two world wars) and only 5% Irish and Scottish and less than 5% French. So I'm 90% German/English or 95% British Isles/German. I wasn't as diverse as I'd been told.

What I did then was list all the towns my ancestors are from then I tried to trace the history of the region back to the year 0. I looked for some of my surnames in the doomsday book of England in the 11th century.

There's some genealogy freaks that actually trace parts of ancestry back to 1000, 1100 1200 years to kings. (once you go that far back there is certainly an illegitimate birth that should break your chain because it is just too long, but anyways also because how large trees get we're all related to the kings and queens so going back 1000 years is pointless)

Also a good book about tracing the ancestry of a people back to the ice age (12 thousand years ago) is the book "The origin of the British". They try to determine the size of each migration into the isles to determine what is the ethnic makeup of the modern day British. They found about 60% of British DNA is from the initial colonization of the Isles after the ice age (when the isles were linked from ireland to france by land).

I hope that helps you so....
1) if you want to find out what countries your ancestors came from try ancestry dot com. (23andme is not going to tell you this for example england norway france and germany overlap- which means that it cannot even concretely define people to that level- not to mention it averages your ancestry together)

2) If you want to trace your ancestry back 1000 years recognize that we're all related to each other back that far. So read histories instead, for your surname look for earliest sources of it like in the doomsday book.

3) If you want to trace the entire genes of a people read "The origin of the british". Wish they had one for germany.

Geez this is a huge answer....

Sybren
Thursday, April 7th, 2011, 07:02 PM
Still, it is nice to actually have "proof" of the relation between a king that lived 1300 years ago and yourself ;) I know most people are descended from them in a way, but most of them cannot prove it ;)

timothyshannon
Thursday, April 7th, 2011, 10:39 PM
Were you actually able to call 23and me? How did you get their phone number? I checked their website, and I was unable to find a number. I was thinking about calling them because I also would like to know about DNA day and be notified of the date it happens.

Here's the contact info I used:

Rubenstein Communications
1345 Ave of the Americas
New York, NY 10105
Contacts:
Jane Rubinstein, 212-843-8287, jrubinstein@rubenstein.com
Rachel Nagler, 212-843-8017, rnagler@rubenstein.com

It was days ago, but someone at one of these numbers gave me the direct line to 23 and me. Sorry I lost that number. Once I called, I pressed a prompt to speak to customer service.

In customer service, they verified that April 15th is "DNA Day" and that somewhere around there they will more than likely do a 1 day special offer.



What you want to do is sign up for ancestry dot com. For example during my first day using it I stared ONLY with my grandparents names and by the end of the day I'd pretty much traced my ancestry back on all lines to about 1850. Family trees are amazing and deeply connected- for example you have 32 g-g-g-grandparents, you have 256 g-g-g-g-g-g grandparents. Once you hit about 1600 you're going to have thousands. It boggles the mind. To go this far back it takes many many many hours of research. It's wildly annoying work, but once you've made a discovery it sinks in over time and makes you look at yourself in a new way. You don't even have to do any work yourself if you don't want to- just go back to about 1850 on your lines (should only take a few hours) and then check out what other people have done tracing the lines back further and copy their trees.

If you're part German once you hit the early 1800''s or mid 1700's you'll find the towns your ancestors came from. If you're English once you hit the 1600's you'll find out where your ancestors came from in Europe.

Thanks for all of this info!!!

I am not interested in DNA to find relatives. I mainly want to use the autosomal DNA test to discover if there is any possibilty of some non-european lineage I might have, since I don't have the facts to the contrary.

I have used ancestry dot com and so far:

- I have proved my maternal side back to Germany in the 1800s, Bohemia in 1850, and England as far back as the 1500s

- on my paternal side I have found almost nothing BEFORE immigration to America. I have found them all back to about 1775, then the trail goes cold.

Through time I will eventually find it all, but the DNA test can at least clarify which direction I should go on my spiritual path. I don't want to get elbows deep into Asatru, for example, and find out later that my paternal side all descend from Spain or Russia. I don't see that as a possiblity given my ancestors surnames and appearance, but I also can't eliminate it 100% as a possiblity.

Wynterwade
Friday, April 8th, 2011, 05:09 AM
I am not interested in DNA to find relatives. I mainly want to use the autosomal DNA test to discover if there is any possibilty of some non-european lineage I might have, since I don't have the facts to the contrary.
Past 5 generations the tests are not able to pick up anything. Like had my 6th great grandmother been a full blooded Indian it would not show up on my results as significant. The tests are not as accurate as you might think.



I have used ancestry dot com and so far:

- I have proved my maternal side back to Germany in the 1800s, Bohemia in 1850, and England as far back as the 1500s

- on my paternal side I have found almost nothing BEFORE immigration to America. I have found them all back to about 1775, then the trail goes cold.

Through time I will eventually find it all, but the DNA test can at least clarify which direction I should go on my spiritual path. I don't want to get elbows deep into Asatru, for example, and find out later that my paternal side all descend from Spain or Russia. I don't see that as a possiblity given my ancestors surnames and appearance, but I also can't eliminate it 100% as a possiblity

Right I see what you're saying. But it cannot eliminate it with a 100% possibility. Remember that it averages your DNA together. So if you're half Russian and half German (which I doubt you're half russian) for example you'd probably land in the middle of Poland/Ukraine on the analysis. If you're trying to find out if you're like 1/8th Russian and 7/8ths German/British it will not pick up the Russian virtually at all and just place you towards the east part of England/Germany (which is nowhere near russia genetically so you'd never know that Russia was even picked up).

I was also expecting to find something strange in my DNA test (like maybe it'd throw me into Ireland or Austria or something unexpected) but I only found out that all my results were the exact same as my ancestry dot com information- southern German + Southern english = 23andme places me in the netherlands and northern germany near the SE english people.

I say test genetics only to find out interesting personal traits about yourself like diseases and recessive traits, etc.

For ancestry, ancestry dot com is the way to go.

Sybren
Friday, April 8th, 2011, 11:26 AM
But maybe for some other people the DNA tests are useful?

For example i myself have done extensive genealogical research already. I have a family tree with about 1650 known ancestors. Most of them fairly sure and all of them from either Fryslân or northern Holland or northern Germany. So in that case a DNA test could be a further confirmation (or not) couldn't it? Even if it is just about 5, 6 generations back.

Wynterwade
Friday, April 8th, 2011, 03:55 PM
But maybe for some other people the DNA tests are useful?

Yes if you want to find out personal traits like if you are a carrier of a disease, recessive traits, or what type of musle you have- sprinting or twitch. For ancestry it can be useful if you are adopted and want to know the ancestry of one of your parents (like if you know your mom is British and you're not sure what your father is and just want to see where you will end up on the ancestry painting section of 23andme, or if you know a couple people that can be your father and you are all going to get tested to find out who is your real father through autosomal comparison section of the site).

It will not say something like (you are Dutch and 1/8th German... I'll get into why later in the post)


For example i myself have done extensive genealogical research already. I have a family tree with about 1650 known ancestors. Most of them fairly sure and all of them from either Fryslân or northern Holland or northern Germany. So in that case a DNA test could be a further confirmation (or not) couldn't it? Even if it is just about 5, 6 generations back.
No it wouldn't.

First of all 1650 is like 15 generations ago not 5 or 6. It will only tell you something if your g-g-grandfather is from Sudan or Japan or Native Australian or Native American (which I seriously doubt). Otherwise if he was not from someplace really foreign- which even includes places like Spain, Italy, Greece, Russia- you will not notice a thing on you're ancestry painting.

Second of all considering the the mt-dna and pt-dna lines it tells you nothing about your ancestry. In Netherlands for example there are 12 major haplogroups. So no matter which one you belong to it tells you nothing about your ancestry because it only accounts for your g-g-g-g-g-g grandfather or mother back thousands of years ago which is only .0000000000000001% of your total ancestry. look here...
http://www.eupedia.com/europe/european_y-dna_haplogroups.shtml
(people use haplogroups to determine who is directly descendant from the same man, so if you have a distant 4th cousin who thinks you may share the same g-g-g-grand you can check with pt or mt lines)


Thrid of all, (I'm checking the ancestry painting section right now) and the reasons for this is because Germany, France, England all overlap. In other words it can place you in the same box as Germany, France, England which also includes many people from countries that are not included in the analysis but are in between them such as Belgium, Lux, and the Netherlands. This really shows how inefficient it is (it's not able to be more exact then saying you are maybe French, German, English Dutch or Belgian). I'm about 25% southern german and 75% british and I was placed just below the English box in Northern Germany which isn't surprising. But I'm also in the French box which covers pretty much the same entire box as Germany. Like you were saying earlier about you maybe having German ancestry, if you have even less % ancestry from a place even closer to your predominate ancestry then I seriously doubt it will be able to pick it up- instead you'd probably just be placed somewhere in the random hodgepodge of being in many boxes at the same time- the France box, German box and english box.

The most accurate mt and pt DNA tests can determine is about 2000 years ago and scientists are not even sure exactly if this is true. My R1b1b2a1a1 is thought to have arisen in the north sea about 2,000 years ago and is thought to correspond somewhat with Anglo-Saxon vikings. So that will tell you .00000000000001% of your ancestry.

And again pt and mt DNA is useful for scientists when determining ancient population migrations and basically nothing else (unless you're trying to find out if somebody is a 4th or 7th cousin or something directly descendant from the same man or woman).

Sybren
Friday, April 8th, 2011, 05:46 PM
That is very informative and useful, thank you :)

I will hold it off until DNA tests are significantly improved.

Stanley
Saturday, April 9th, 2011, 01:45 AM
What you want to do is sign up for ancestry dot com.

Whoa! After reading this I went and singed up for their 14-day free trial and traced my paternal line all the way back to an English immigrant from Hertfordshire in 1637. I never really thought I had ancestors in America that long ago, because the majority of my ancestry is composed of relatively recent emigrations from Ireland and Sweden.

In addition, I discovered for the first time today that I have some German and Scottish heritage. Previously my dad had always told me his father's father's side of the family was English, and while going through the records did prove that most of my ancestors from this lineage were indeed English, I found quite a few Germans and Scots. What an odd feeling.

It was also nice to confirm what I'd been told about my other ancestors. I found out one of my Swedish immigrant ancestors' maiden names, which I was always curious to find out, was Swanson (Anglicized Svensson). I've always quite liked that name, now I like it even more. :D

TXRog
Saturday, April 9th, 2011, 01:51 AM
Nice indeed! Hail!

What region of Texas do you live? I am in the DFW area.

Were you born in America? Did your family provide you with any decent genealogical data or family tree dating back to the motherland?

Hail my Germanic brother and great to hear from you.

I am from San Antonio and live in FW.

Yes, I was born in America and my heritage is exactly 50% German and 50% Irish.

timothyshannon
Saturday, April 9th, 2011, 04:16 AM
Hail my Germanic brother and great to hear from you.

I am from San Antonio and live in FW.

Yes, I was born in America and my heritage is exactly 50% German and 50% Irish.

Fantastic. I live in Garland, so we are on opposite sides of the metroplex. Still, we should find the time one day to share an ale somewhere in the middle, Grapevine perhaps?

And just to update this thread on my personal search:

I came across an ancestor online who lives about 1800 miles away in Salem who is a genealogy freak. He is also like 80 years old! He filled in a ton of stuff by emailing me a spreadsheet.

-I have traced half of my paternal lineage to Scotland and England in the 1500's, with half still left to research
-I have traced maternal lineage mostly to England in 1600s, about 25% to Germany in 1600s, and a couple in Bohemia in 1700's

I do still have many blanks to fill, but I am feeling more confident in my Geramanic lineage.

Question: Does anyone have ideas of what to expect in lineage from Bohemia? It's not a very big percentage of my heritage, but I haven't really read much about the region except that it is smack in between Germany and Austria. Didn't it used to be Germany?

Hesse
Saturday, April 9th, 2011, 05:28 AM
All a DNA test can tell you about your ancestry is that it averages your european ancestry together and picks a spot right in the middle. My ancestry is mostly English and Southern German so it placed me in northern Germany along the Danish boarder into the Netherlands even though I have little ancestry from that region.


Remember that it averages your DNA together. So if you're half Russian and half German (which I doubt you're half russian) for example you'd probably land in the middle of Poland/Ukraine on the analysis. If you're trying to find out if you're like 1/8th Russian and 7/8ths German/British it will not pick up the Russian virtually at all and just place you towards the east part of England/Germany (which is nowhere near russia genetically so you'd never know that Russia was even picked up).


Based on this, so if you're like say, half Swedish, half Italian, you'd be somewhere in Germany, it works like that?

For instance, I have German (Prussian), Sudetenland, Norwegian, Irish, a small amount of French, and even lesser amounts of Belgian/Luxembourg (about 1/16 each) ancestrys.

So if it averages all of your heritages, and puts you at a middle ground, should I then expect to see my ancestry painting approximately somewhere in Northwestern Germany or Netherlands (I estimate that to be approx. the average spot between all the ancestral locations I listed)?

TXRog
Saturday, April 9th, 2011, 05:29 AM
Fantastic. I live in Garland, so we are on opposite sides of the metroplex. Still, we should find the time one day to share an ale somewhere in the middle, Grapevine perhaps?

And just to update this thread on my personal search:

I came across an ancestor online who lives about 1800 miles away in Salem who is a genealogy freak. He is also like 80 years old! He filled in a ton of stuff by emailing me a spreadsheet.

-I have traced half of my paternal lineage to Scotland and England in the 1500's, with half still left to research
-I have traced maternal lineage mostly to England in 1600s, about 25% to Germany in 1600s, and a couple in Bohemia in 1700's

I do still have many blanks to fill, but I am feeling more confident in my Geramanic lineage.

Question: Does anyone have ideas of what to expect in lineage from Bohemia? It's not a very big percentage of my heritage, but I haven't really read much about the region except that it is smack in between Germany and Austria. Didn't it used to be Germany?

Sounds great to me, Tim. I will send you a PM with my contact info.

Wynterwade
Saturday, April 9th, 2011, 03:23 PM
Based on this, so if you're like say, half Swedish, half Italian, you'd be somewhere in Germany, it works like that?

Actually this gets confusing. It has a separate section for North, South and East Europe. I have a friend on 23andme who's from Spain, (also of which spain isn't a country 23andme analyzes, in other words spain doesn't have a box) and he's listed in Germany and Tuscany at the same time. I would expect this same thing to happen for someone swedish and italian- to be in both the German box and the Italy box at the same time. (Sweden and Denmark don't have a box by the way so I'd expect Swedes to be near Norway and Germany of which the two overlap a little)


For instance, I have German (Prussian), Sudetenland, Norwegian, Irish, a small amount of French, and even lesser amounts of Belgian/Luxembourg (about 1/16 each) ancestrys.

You'd probably end up in the English, German, French boxes at the same time which also includes people from Be.ne.lux. who don't have a box. It's very general.


So if it averages all of your heritages, and puts you at a middle ground, should I then expect to see my ancestry painting approximately somewhere in Northwestern Germany or Netherlands (I estimate that to be approx. the average spot between all the ancestral locations I listed)?

Yes. Northwestern Germany is in the same box as France and England. The Netherlands doesn't have a box so they fall somewhere in the intersection of Germany, France and England.



Whoa! After reading this I went and singed up for their 14-day free trial and traced my paternal line all the way back to an English immigrant from Hertfordshire in 1637. I never really thought I had ancestors in America that long ago, because the majority of my ancestry is composed of relatively recent emigrations from Ireland and Sweden.

I didn't know either and I probably have 400-600 immigrants to America in my family tree. Of which 100 are from Germany (most immigrants came over in the 1700's and a few early 1800's, of which the 1700's German immigrants equals my percentage ancestry from my 1800's German immigrants- genealogy is mind blowing and works like a massive snowball) The other 500+ immigrants were from the Isles mostly but came over mostly in the 1600's.


In addition, I discovered for the first time today that I have some German and Scottish heritage. Previously my dad had always told me his father's father's side of the family was English, and while going through the records did prove that most of my ancestors from this lineage were indeed English, I found quite a few Germans and Scots. What an odd feeling.

My family had no idea their identity either. Usually families in America discount their German ancestry because of the two world wars. My grandfather is 70% German and didn't tell my grandmother until after they were married. And of couse they never told me or my mother until after I checked ancestry dot com and found out for myself. When I was excited and told them what I found even the cities the Germans came from, my grandmother was angry that I found out we were part German.


It was also nice to confirm what I'd been told about my other ancestors. I found out one of my Swedish immigrant ancestors' maiden names, which I was always curious to find out, was Swanson (Anglicized Svensson). I've always quite liked that name, now I like it even more.

Don't get too addicted to it b/c its a major time drain, and if you can show the site to other family members so they can help you find out interesting information. My own family couldn't care less and i ended up doing 300+ hours research on my own and still none of my family seems appreciative.

Stanley
Saturday, April 9th, 2011, 05:03 PM
Don't get too addicted to it b/c its a major time drain, and if you can show the site to other family members so they can help you find out interesting information. My own family couldn't care less and i ended up doing 300+ hours research on my own and still none of my family seems appreciative.

Thanks for the words of caution. I think I'll just mess around with it for the 14-day free trial and then cancel my account and not look back. The only person I've told about my discoveries was my brother. I think he'd be the only one who'd actually give a crap about it.

To be honest, I logged off the computer last night feeling a bit overwhelmed and uneasy. It's just strange to find out all of this stuff that is contrary to what I've been told, even though it only represents 1/8 of my ancestry. I think I'm content with knowing I'm half Irish with a considerable input of Swedish, and a smaller amount of English, German, and Scottish mixed in. Yes, I'm comfortable with a little uncertainty.

Permafrost
Sunday, April 10th, 2011, 07:40 PM
23andme sale day is coming very soon and now I'm quite confused about which test should I take (23andme or Ancestry.com).

I just saw that on Ancestry.com the paternal AND maternal DNA test is around 330$, whereas the paternal or maternal tests are around 150$.

I don't have 330$ to spend now and I would like to test both my parents genetics. If I buy a kit from 23andme, will it give me information on my mother and father's side or just for one of them ?
I can't find this information on their website and on this thread.

Wynterwade
Sunday, April 10th, 2011, 09:24 PM
23andme sale day is coming very soon and now I'm quite confused about which test should I take (23andme or Ancestry.com).

I just saw that on Ancestry.com the paternal AND maternal DNA test is around 330$, whereas the paternal or maternal tests are around 150$.

I don't have 330$ to spend now and I would like to test both my parents genetics. If I buy a kit from 23andme, will it give me information on my mother and father's side or just for one of them ?
I can't find this information on their website and on this thread.

23andme tells you your pt-dna, mt-dna, the diseases you carry (so you know what your future children might inherit), it tells you your eye genetics(so you can calculate if you and your partner had kids what percentage of your kids will have blue or green or brown eyes- which i thought was pretty cool because i didn't know how eyes worked before- its not like normal cross boxes you learn about in high school) it tells you your muscle type (sprinter or long distance) the percentage chance your kids will have blonde/red hair. It tells you your perecntage european and the percentage african/eastasian/ etc.

Look on youtube at peoples results from 23andme. They'll show you more than i feel like typing here.

I believe all the ancestry dot com site genetic testing does is the pt-and mt- lines. (which is the lamest discovery that 23andme does because it doesnt tell you anything about your heritage for reasons i listed above)

Two Conclusions-
1) 23andme is the way to go for genetic research. - Get it while it's cheap to find out interesting genetic information about yourself and your future kids.
2) Ancestry (dot) com is for looking up ancestry records like census records, birth/marriage/death records. War records etc. to trace back your ancestors/where they lived/where they came from/ what job they had etc.....

If I were you I'd just buy a 23andme box for yourself. Who cares about your parents- let them spend their own money themselves if they're interested in it. The information can only say things like "you have a increased risk of diabetes type 2 by 30%"- if your parents want to hear things like that then tell them to buy it.

Permafrost
Sunday, April 10th, 2011, 09:33 PM
According to this page (http://dna.ancestry.com/buyKitGoals.aspx) you have to choose between pt- and mt- lines, or maybe am I missing something ?

I think I'm going to buy the 23andme kit, because it still seems that there are some interesting information, and it's very cheap (it's not like I'm putting 2000$ in it) ;)

I'll maybe see later for Ancestry.com kits. Anyways, thanks for your answer Wynterwade ;)

Hesse
Sunday, April 10th, 2011, 09:57 PM
I have never done one of these tests before, so I have no previous knowledge myself, but I was recommended to 23andme since it does your paternal and maternal lines, and also autosomal DNA in one test.

I think what Wynterwade means when he recommends Ancestry.com is for finding records (the "paper trail" research method) about your ancestors, not genetic testing.


Two Conclusions-
1) 23andme is the way to go for genetic research. - Get it while it's cheap to find out interesting genetic information about yourself and your future kids.
2) Ancestry (dot) com is for looking up ancestry records like census records, birth/marriage/death records. War records etc. to trace back your ancestors/where they lived/where they came from/ what job they had etc.....


With all that 23andme offers, http://dna.ancestry.com seems like a waste. I don't see anything they offer that you don't get with the 23and me, also it is on sale at the moment. Even if you wait it out it's still a better deal. So you made the right choice I think.

timothyshannon
Monday, April 11th, 2011, 01:54 AM
Sounds great to me, Tim. I will send you a PM with my contact info.

awesome

Magni
Monday, April 11th, 2011, 01:48 PM
Be careful with ancestry.com, there is a LOT of bad genealogy on there.

Also your mt dna and y dna are from direct lines, yes, but that is not all the ancestry painting takes from. It looks at all your dna.

Hesse
Tuesday, April 12th, 2011, 04:31 AM
Past 5 generations the tests are not able to pick up anything. Like had my 6th great grandmother been a full blooded Indian it would not show up on my results as significant. The tests are not as accurate as you might think.


Here, lets say for example, even though they don't directly come from a foreighn place, but happen to be descended from a completely foreign lineage, would it be able to tell if an ancestor from Western Europe 5 generations ago is like 100% jewish or asian or something? Basically what I'm sayin is would it tell you if your European ancestors were foreighn blooded.

dgirlc
Tuesday, April 19th, 2011, 12:25 AM
On my mothers side I know all about our genealogy, etc, on my fathers side they I guess haven't been quite as interested in learning about lineage, genealogy, etc, all that I really know is that he is around 25% italian, and 25% german, is family tree dna (i think it's called) a good place for dna tests?

Hesse
Wednesday, May 11th, 2011, 03:07 AM
Question: Does anyone have ideas of what to expect in lineage from Bohemia? It's not a very big percentage of my heritage, but I haven't really read much about the region except that it is smack in between Germany and Austria. Didn't it used to be Germany?


I'm have the same question as you, since Bohemian is also part of my heritage (about 1/8, my great grandmother is from Bohemia). Hence I had done a little research on the area, and the areas where the Germans lived was known as Sudetenland. Which part of Bohemia did your ancestors come from?
Germans were especially concentrated around the border areas of the region. See map below.

http://i619.photobucket.com/albums/tt279/german24/Bohemia.jpg


My Bohemian great grandmother was from a village called Wienau, located in the southern portion of that gray outer fringe.

Bohemia is north of Austria, east of Germany and makes up the western portion of where present day Czechoslovakia is . It is my knowledge, that up until 1945, when the German population was driven out that several parts of Bohemia were historically Germanic/German settelments according to the above map but I'm still quite curious about what the average Bohemian 19th century is racially. Bohemia has undergone a lot of border boundary and ethnic changes over the centuries, so it's hard to define what an ancestor from this region is. But I think of my ancestor from there as Germanic because she was speaking a German language and from a very ethnic German village there, so it's not that much different racially compared to an ancestor from Germany, am I wrong?