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celticviking
Saturday, April 2nd, 2011, 01:28 PM
Lóriði is the son of Thor and Sif and forefather of Norse rulers, according to the prologue of the Prose Edda. Loridi does not appear in any other instance of Norse mythology.

One should note that the author of the Prose Edda Snorri Sturluson was a Christian and he used the prologue to explain how the Norse pagans came to believe what they did. The prologue allowed Snorri the framework to assert that he was a Christian before going on to relate the potentially heretical pagan tales of the Norse gods in the Gylfaginning. Snorri posits the theory that many of the heroes from ancient city of Troy came to Scandinavia and were revered as gods and demigods.

For these reasons Lóriði should not be considered the son of the mythical Thor. Lóriði is not an actual part of the ancient Norse myths
Near the earth's centre was made that goodliest of homes and haunts that ever have been, which is called Troy, even that which we call Turkland. This abode was much more gloriously made than others, and fashioned with more skill of craftsmanship in manifold wise, both in luxury and in the wealth which was there in abundance. There were twelve kingdoms and one High King, and many sovereignties belonged to each kingdom; in the stronghold were twelve chieftains. These chieftains were in every manly part greatly above other men that have ever been in the world. One king among them was called Múnón or Mennón; and he was wedded to the daughter of the High King Priam, her who was called Tróán; they had a child named Trór, whom we call Thor. He was fostered in Thrace by a certain war-duke called Lóríkus; but when he was ten winters old he took unto him the weapons of his father. He was as goodly to look upon, when he came among other men, as the ivory that is inlaid in oak; his hair was fairer than gold. When he was twelve winters old he had his full measure of strength; then he lifted clear of the earth ten bear-skins all at one time; and then he slew Duke Lóríkus, his foster-father, and with him his wife Lórá, or Glórá, and took into his own hands the realm of Thrace, which we call Thrúdheim. Then he went forth far and wide over the lands, and sought out every quarter of the earth, overcoming alone all berserks and giants, and one dragon, greatest of all dragons, and many beasts. In the northern half of his kingdom he found the prophetess that is called Síbil, whom we call Sif, and wedded her. The lineage of Sif I cannot tell; she was fairest of all women, and her hair was like gold. Their son was Lóridi, who resembled his father; his son was Einridi, his son Vingethor, his son Vingener, his son Móda, his son Magi, his son Seskef, his son Bedvig, his son Athra (whom we call Annarr), his son Ítermann, his son Heremód, his son Skjaldun (whom we call Skjöld), his son Bjáf (whom we call Bjárr), his son Ját, his son Gudólfr, his son Finn, his son Fríallaf (whom we call Fridleifr); his son was he who is named Vóden, whom we call Odin: he was a man far-famed for wisdom and every accomplishment. His wife was Frígídá, whom we call Frigg.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%B3ri%C3%B0i

Grimnirson
Thursday, May 5th, 2011, 11:48 AM
The problem with the intro to Snorri's Edda is that it had to be couched in a way that the Christian rulers of the time would not find heretical. Later on, Snorri writes something along the lines that he is writing this so that those who seek the old mysteries may find them. He made up the Asia minor story so that it would seem like a work of fiction and not a collection of religious writings. If you look closely enough at what he has written, you will fins that he was not a Christian, but a devout Odin's man. He simply hid the truth in a lie so that it would survive

celticviking
Thursday, May 5th, 2011, 05:15 PM
Baltic-Origins-Homers-Epic
http://www.amazon.com/Baltic-Origins-Homers-Epic-Tales/product-reviews/1594770522
http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1173088817l/245164.jpg







War happened not in the Mediterranean, but in the Baltic.
Identifies the true geographic sites of Troy and Ithaca in the Baltic Sea and Calypso’s Isle in the North Atlantic Ocean

For years scholars have debated the incongruities in Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, given that his descriptions are at odds with the geography of the areas he purportedly describes. Inspired by Plutarch’s remark that Calypso’s Isle was only five days sailing from Britain, Felice Vinci convincingly argues that Homer’s epic tales originated not in the Mediterranean, but in the northern Baltic Sea.

Using meticulous geographical analysis, Vinci shows that many Homeric places, such as Troy and Ithaca, can still be identified in the geographic landscape of the Baltic. He explains how the dense, foggy weather described by Ulysses befits northern not Mediterranean climes, and how battles lasting through the night would easily have been possible in the long days of the Baltic summer. Vinci’s meteorological analysis reveals how a decline of the “climatic optimum” caused the blond seafarers to migrate south to warmer climates, where they rebuilt their original world in the Mediterranean. Through many generations the memory of the heroic age and the feats performed by their ancestors in their lost homeland was preserved and handed down to the following ages, only later to be codified by Homer in the Iliad and the Odyssey.

http://perfidy.org/troy-like-many-other-cool-things-is-in-finland/



http://celto-germanic.blogspot.com/2008/12/homer-in-baltic.html

celticviking
Thursday, May 5th, 2011, 05:22 PM
Thrace=


historical and geographic area in southeast Europe. As a geographical concept, Thrace designates a region bounded by the Balkan Mountains on the north, Rhodope Mountains and the Aegean Sea on the south, and by the Black Sea and the Sea of Marmara on the east. The areas it comprises are southeastern Bulgaria (Northern Thrace), northeastern Greece (Western Thrace), and the European part of Turkey (Eastern Thrace). The biggest part of Thrace is part of present-day Bulgaria. In Bulgaria and Turkey, it is also called Rumelia. The name comes from the Thracians, an ancient Indo-European people inhabiting Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thrace

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thracians

Catterick
Saturday, September 17th, 2016, 07:39 PM
Well Snorri did not entirely invent the Asia Minor story: it is famously attested from the Caucasus that an Ossetian (= Alan) was worshipped by the Rus (= Swedes). Snorri mixed the royal genealogies with Homer which was common in Christianised Europe, and incorporated memories of Germanic and Alanic raids against the Romans in Asia Minor.

Shadow
Saturday, September 17th, 2016, 10:36 PM
This whole concept is ridiculous.