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View Full Version : The Murder of Tim McLean



Northern Paladin
Monday, February 21st, 2011, 06:56 PM
The incident took place near Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, during a trip from Edmonton to McLean's hometown of Winnipeg.[3]

At 12:01 a.m. on July 30, 2008, Tim McLean, a carnival worker, was returning home to Manitoba after working at a fair in Alberta.[4] He departed Edmonton on board Greyhound bus 1170 to Winnipeg, via the Yellowhead Highway through Saskatchewan. He sat at the rear, one row ahead of the washroom. At 6:55 p.m., the bus departed from a stop in Erickson, Manitoba with a new passenger, Vince Weiguang Li.[5][6] Li, described as a tall man in his 40s, with a shaved head and sunglasses, originally sat near the front of the bus, but moved to sit next to McLean following a scheduled rest stop. McLean "barely acknowledged" Li, then fell asleep against the window pane, headphones covering his ears.[7]

According to witnesses, McLean was sleeping with his headphones on when the man sitting next to him suddenly produced a large knife and began stabbing McLean in the neck and chest. The attacker then decapitated McLean and displayed his severed head to other passengers outside who had fled the bus in horror. The driver and two other men attempted to rescue McLean but were chased away by Li, who slashed wildly at them from behind the locked bus doors. Li then went back to the body and began severing other body parts and consuming some of McLean's flesh.

At 8:30 p.m., the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba received a report of a stabbing on a Greyhound bus west of the city. They arrived to find the suspect still on board the bus, being prevented from escaping by another passenger, the bus driver, and a truck driver who had provided a crowbar and a hammer as weapons. The other passengers were huddled at the roadside, some of them crying and vomiting. As the suspect had earlier attempted to escape by driving the bus away, the driver had engaged the emergency immobilizer system, rendering the vehicle inoperable. Witnesses had observed the suspect stabbing and cutting McLean's body, and carrying McLean's severed head.[7]

By 9:00 p.m., police were in a standoff with the suspect and had summoned special negotiators and a heavily-armed tactical unit. The suspect taunted police, alternately pacing the length of the bus and cutting and defiling the corpse. Police officers then observed Li eating parts of the body.[5] Meanwhile, the stranded passengers were transported from the scene to be interviewed at the Brandon RCMP detachment.[7] RCMP officers reportedly heard Li say, "I have to stay on the bus forever."[5]

On July 31, 2008, at 1:30 a.m., the suspect attempted to escape from the bus by breaking through a window. The RCMP arrested Li soon afterward.[6][8] He was tasered twice, handcuffed and placed in the back of a police cruiser. Parts of the victim's body, placed in plastic bags, were retrieved from the bus, while his ear, nose and tongue were found in Li's pockets. The victim's eyes and a part of his heart were never recovered and are presumed to have been eaten by the accused.[9]

At 10:00 a.m., Greyhound representatives took the other passengers to a local store to replace their clothes, which remained on the bus. They arrived in Winnipeg at 3:30 p.m. that day, to be reunited with family members and friends.[

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Tim_McLean

The Aesthete
Tuesday, February 22nd, 2011, 06:27 AM
He was found to be not criminally responsible for the murder and was remanded to a high-security mental health facility where he remains to this day

Li was an immigrant from China in June 11, 2001, Canada should better screen who they let in

This man is now a massive financial burden on the Canadian people

Autosomal Viking
Tuesday, February 22nd, 2011, 07:51 AM
That's really sick. Would it to be too reminiscent of the article to yell, "Off with his head!" ?

Ingvaeonic
Sunday, February 27th, 2011, 04:55 AM
Bloody sick. Li is an excellent example of why the Canadian and Canadian provincial governments should restore the death penalty. I'll make an educated guess and say that the majority of Canadians would support the restoration of the death penalty both federally and provincially. And I'll make another educated guess and say that there are far too many Chinese in Canada, as there are here. From what I've read, Vancouver is thick with Chinese.

And I'll add that a lot of this sort of garbage goes on in China, only you will never get to hear or read about it. The occasional story from China of bizarre crimes involving extreme criminal violence, often sexual criminal violence, might make it to the English-language press or media, but by far most don't: they are either not translated into English from the Chinese press or they are censored by the Chinese government. If you could read Chinese, you would be able to read about a lot more of these sorts of crime in China.

And a case like this also helps support the call for provision within the law for citizenship to be withdrawn for acts of criminal violence or activities against the state. Li cannot be deported to China as he is a naturalised Canadian citizen.

See: http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/story.html?id=74af9925-382e-4175-8ff1-42ed0e4bb2d1

Caledonian
Sunday, February 27th, 2011, 05:04 AM
Bloody sick. Li is an excellent example of why the Canadian and Canadian provincial governments should restore the death penalty. I'll make an educated guess and say that the majority of Canadians would support the restoration of the death penalty both federally and provincially. And I'll make another educated guess and say that there are far too many Chinese in Canada, as there are here. From what I've read, Vancouver is thick with Chinese.

Where I live my city is inundated with Thai, Laosians, Japanese, Vietnamese, and Indians.

Gardisten
Tuesday, March 15th, 2011, 08:55 PM
Reinstating the death penalty would be a legal nightmare. If you look at the States, for example, the death penalty does nothing apparently to curb violent crimes, and the system has evolved so that the courts can get tied up with appeals. This can drag on for years, if not decades, and is a considerable waste of taxpayer's money. Another problem is the fact that the Canadian justice system really just doesn't function all that well, and there have been too many examples of people being wrongfully convicted. Still another factor is that Canada and hence the legal system has changed somewhat since the death penalty was abolished in the 1970s. It has become increasingly left-leaning and heterogeneous--I personally wouldn't want the current system to have the power to impose the death penalty.