PDA

View Full Version : What Migrations Have Your Lineage Made from Early Modern to Current?



Barreldriver
Sunday, February 6th, 2011, 10:28 PM
Don't have to post real specific regarding current plotting (privacy protection and all) just curious to see the kinds of migrations made within the last 400 years or so, feel free to include some stories regarding why family migrations happened and such.

My lineage's migrations from the 1600's to now:

Hatfield Chase, Yorkshire, England ->Stainforth, Yorkshire, England (post 1626)->Whitgift, Yorkshire, England->Blacktoft, Yorkshire, England->Mecklenburg, Virginia (1773)->North Carolinian frontier->Overton County, Tennessee(1810-2011)->Northeast Ohio(Great Depression-2011) [we currently switch residencies between Overton County, Tennessee and Northeast Ohio depending on economy and other factors].

As for the move from Hatfield Chase to other parts of Yorkshire I can only think of one thing:

from wiki about Hatfield Chase:

Hatfield Chase lay above the confluence of three rivers, the Don, the Torne and the Idle, which meandered into the Trent near its entrance to the Humber. The whole of this area, apart from the Isle of Axholme, is less than 10 feet (3.0 m) above sea level and was therefore subject to frequent flooding. Although the area included some common land it was unlawful to take fish or game though many locals gained their livelihood by fishing and fowling [1] the area which was unsuitable for agriculture.

The circumstances of Charles' appointment of Vermuyden to drain this area in 1626 are obscure. A story that he had accompanied an earlier royal hunting party is almost certainly fictional. [2] But the king was keen to make his assets profitable and the contract divided the land into three parts, one for the king, one for the adventurers who would drain the land and the remainder for those locals who had interests in the land.

Vermuyden brought over a number of Walloon partners, known as the Participants, who took shares and performed the drainage work, including a number of Huguenot families fleeing from religious persecution who settled at Sandtoft.[3] The work was substantially completed by 1628 at a cost of £400,000.[4]

The eastern branch of the Don river was blocked and the banks of the northern branch into the River Aire were raised.[5] The northern branch was originally a Roman navigation channel called Turnbridgedike. A 2-mile (3.2 km) bank which ran along the south side of the river from Fishlake to Thorne included a navigable sluice, to allow boats to reach Sandtoft. Lifting gates gave access to a lock chamber which was 50 by 15 feet (15 by 4.6 m). Beyond Thorne, a further bank ran for 5 miles (8.0 km) to the Aire. The River Idle was blocked by a dam and its waters were diverted into the River Trent at Stockwith along Bycarrs Dyke. A 5-mile (8.0 km) barrier bank was constructed along the northern edge of the channel, from the dam to the River Trent. The Torne was embanked and straightened by cutting a drain which emptied via a sluice into the Trent at Althorpe. An 8-mile (13 km) drain was cut from where the Idle had been blocked to Dirtness, passing under the Torne at Tunnel Pits. At Dirtness it was joined by another drain, bringing water from the west, and then ran for a further 5 miles (8.0 km) to another sluice at Althorpe. The work was on a scale not previously seen in England, and Vermuyden's contribution was recognised when he was knighted in January 1629.[6] In 1629, a Court of Sewers for the Level of Hatfield Chase was established by Royal Warrant.[4]

The drainage transformed the whole area, creating rich agricultural land where there had previously been swamps though it was still subject to periodic flooding.

Many local people were not very happy with the outcome. Those entitled to common rights, mainly from the Isle of Axholme, claimed they had been allotted the worst land. There were complaints of flooding from those further down the Don in the villages of Fishlake, Sykehouse and Snaith. Recrimination against foreign settlers was encouraged by those who had lost their fishing and other livelihood.

The move from Yorkshire to Virginia was caused by religious and inheritance strife among family members, the move from Virginia to the North Carolina frontier and later Tennessee was again because of inheritance issues and the historic Cohee migration (middle and lower class farmers moving out of Virginia into North Carolina as North Carolina had become a promise land for the non gentry). The move from North Carolina to Tennessee wasn't really a move, we just so happened to settle in the parts of North Carolina that later became Tennessee. Around 1810 we moved a bit westward in the rather young Tennessee into Overton County. The Great Depression instigated the first move from Tennessee to Ohio, after that we've just migrated back and forth between the two states depending on financial situations and education opportunities.

Hamar Fox
Sunday, February 6th, 2011, 10:36 PM
I'd like to post more in this thread when I'm over this cough, but I can't resist posting this. My earliest unbrokenly (made up word) traceable ancestor, Hamar Fox, was born in Dewsbury, West Riding of Yorkshire in 1515. I was born in Leeds, West Riding of Yorkshire. The distance between Dewsbury and Leeds is eight miles :D

Barreldriver
Sunday, February 6th, 2011, 10:46 PM
I'd like to post more in this thread when I'm over this cough, but I can't resist posting this. My earliest unbrokenly (made up word) traceable ancestor, Hamar Fox, was born in Dewsbury, West Riding of Yorkshire in 1515. I was born in Leeds, West Riding of Yorkshire. The distance between Dewsbury and Leeds is eight miles :D

Dang, that's a LONG time within such a small radius. Your folks must have been some tough cookies to wait out so many years within an 8 mile radius (a lot of events to witness I'd bet). :p

Wynterwade
Sunday, February 6th, 2011, 10:58 PM
My families migrations....

Well my German ancestors constitute 25% of my ancestry and came to America during two times.
1) 12.5% of my ancestry from Prussia, central Germany, Alsace-Lorraine (not sure what Alsace was was called then), and Bavaria during the 1700's to Pennsylvania. I think they came to America because of poverty due to wars.
2) 12.5% of my ancestry is from southern Germany (Baden and Württemberg) Just after Napoleon was invaded by Russia in the early 1800's and afterwards poverty caused my ancestors to leave.

My English ancestors, I think constitute about 50-60% of my ancestry, came over between the 1600's and 1850. But mostly from the 1600's and early 1700's.
1) Pilgrims on the mayflower and other boats
2) Farmers to the Southern US

My Scottish ancestors came over (not sure how large this side of my family is either but I estimated it at 4%)
1) Because they were protestant and got free land
2) As prisoners during wars when they fought England

My Irish Ancestors came over (I have no idea how big this side is- it's hard to go back to 1700 on all sides of your tree but I estimated it at 4%.)
1) Because of the Potato famine

I also have ancestors from other places and account for smaller amounts of my ancestry....
1) 1.5% of my ancestry is of a Northern Spanish political family who escaped when the Peruvian government was overthrown in the 1820's-1830's and married into a very wealthy English family in America (the most interesting story in my family tree).
2) Somewhere less than 5% of my ancestry is French- They were Huguenots fleeing the French Religious wars where they would go house to house killing all protestant families 1500's moved to Belgium and Netherlands and Germany- some of which came to America in the 1600's to new Amsterdam (aka New York City). And also Catholics sent to colonize New France in the 1700's.
3)Switzerland-1700's.
4) Belgium and the Netherlands- (married into the French Huguenots that came to New Amsterdam- NYC in the 1600's)
5) Denmark who moved to New Amsterdam in the 1600's.

I have somewhere between 400 and 600 migrations in my tree. (most are 10-15 generations back). With the most recent being 6 generations back (early 1850's from Leeds England).

Loyalist
Sunday, February 6th, 2011, 11:44 PM
My earliest direct paternal ancestor (4 x great-grandfather) was born around 1820 in Scotland. I do not know the exact location of his birth, nor why he settled in Canada, but there is a clue from his wife, my 4 x great-grandmother. Her parents were Gaelic-speaking Highland Scots from Sutherland. During the Highland Clearances, they opted to join a large party of refugees heading to what is now the province of Manitoba (then the Red River Colony). They first headed to the Orkney Islands, boarding a ship at Stromness for the Atlantic crossing. Arriving in Hudson's Bay in 1815, they navigated the various rivers in northern Canada and finally reached the settlement. The colony never thrived, and the harsh conditions, coupled with frequent attacks from local Indians, prompted most of the colonists, my family included, to relocate to Ontario. I do not know if my 4 x great-grandfather was one of the Red River colonists or not, as he and his wife were married in Ontario, long after the settlement was abandoned.

Also on my father's side, a Huguenot ancestor (my 7 x great-grandmother) had quite a storied life. She was born in France in 1749. When Louis XV came to the throne, he resumed vicious persecution of French Protestants. On one occasion, she hid inside a chimney as French soldiers ransacked the family's house. At the age of 12, her family fled to Bern, Switzerland. While there, they became Mennonites and later migrated with some Swiss-Germans to Mannheim, Germany. In 1765, they boarded a ship in Rotterdam, Netherlands carrying one of the last Palatine groups to head to Pennsylvania. On the ship, she met one of the Swiss-Germans who had accompanied the group since Bern. The man was my 7 x great-grandfather, and they married as soon as the ship reached Philadelphia. They farmed in Lancaster County until the Revolutionary War broke out, and then fled to Canada with the Loyalists, carrying all of their possessions on an ox-wagon. They settled Hamilton, Ontario in 1795, building a farm and church on their property. The church is still there, albeit not the original one, still bears the family's surname, and is only a few minutes drive from my house. I think it's incredible that someone in the 18th century lived in or visited six countries (France, Switzerland, Germany, Netherlands, the United States, and Canada) and witnesses so many eras and events in history.

On my mother's side, my grandmother's direct paternal ancestor was born in a small village in Wales in the early 17th century. He relocated to London, where he became a constable. He killed a man in a tavern in self-defence, was was accordingly pardoned by King Charles I in 1625. Shortly afterwards, he and his brother departed for the Colonies, arriving in Maryland. While there, he was kidnapped by Baron Baltimore's men, but escaped, and fled to New Amsterdam. There he married an English woman and converted to her Quaker faith. Their descendants continued to live in New York state until the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, when they too departed for Canada with the Loyalists and settled in the Niagara region.

Hammish
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 12:15 AM
On my father's side the earliest direct name ancestor was born in Norfolk county England in 1548, his son was born in Dorset in 1577 and died in Somerset County 1650.

His son was Born in Dorset in 1616 and emigrated to New England colony sometime around 1636 as an indentured servant (Slave), the male line stayed in Rhode Island for 4 generations with the ones after that ending up in Kentucky by 1830, where they married into Scotch/Irish (Ulster Scots for you Brits) clans all the way til WWII. (Yep hillbillies)

On my mother's side her father emigrated from Glasgow, Scotland in 1923 and came from mostly Lowland lowland stock with the odd Highlander ancestor married into the family.

Her mother was a first generation American whose parents immigrated from SW Germany to Pennsylvania in the late 1800's.

Æmeric
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 04:37 AM
Paternal ancestors left Wales in the late 17th century for New Jersey, then to southwest Pennsylvania around the time of the American Revolution, on to Wheeling (West) Virginia, living on the banks of the Ohio, in Ohio Territory by 1790 - among the earliest White families in that state. On to the prairies of northwest Missouri after the Civil War, after low prices, high railroad freight charge & grasshoppers (http://www.lyndonirwin.com/hopper1.htm), headed east for the Ohio Valley of Indiana.

My mothers paternal ancestors left the Hunsruck region of Germany (it was then part of the Kingdom of Prussia) for America in 1843, via Antwerp, settling in the bank of the Ohio River in Indiana.

Various other branch of the family tree were part of the Great Migration to New England, 1620-1640, to Virginia, New Netherlands/New York, New Sweden, Delaware Valley, Virginia & Maryland, moving up & down the Atlantic Seaboard, over the Appalachias to the Great Lakes & Ohio Valley, evntually ending up in Indiana, birthplace of myself, my parents, my grandparents & 5 of my 8 grandparents. Among the side trips were a 4xgreat grandfather who became a Mormon & died in Utah (grandma came back east & became a Baptist), homesteading adventures in Kansas & a great-great-grandfather who bought railroad land in Mississippi & attempted to develope a farm in the Delta.

Sybren
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 11:53 AM
My ancestors didn't really made major migrations in the past, not the ones i know of at least. More than 95 percent of the ones i found lived in Friesland or what used to be Friesland, and i found over 1500 of them. The rest came from either different parts of Holland or Germany.

My oldest found ancestor was Gustavus Forteman, he died in 792 AD and was the father of Magnus Forteman, who is a legendary Frisian: Magnus Forteman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnus_Forteman)
Gustavus Forteman is my 36th generation ancestor.

My paternal lineage originally came from Germany, from places like Schüttorf and Emden. Both not far over the border from Holland though.

I think people put to much importance on their surname lineages though, those are just a small part of your heritage. All other lineages are just as important.

Barreldriver
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 12:19 PM
My ancestors didn't really made major migrations in the past, not the ones i know of at least. More than 95 percent of the ones i found lived in Friesland or what used to be Friesland, and i found over 1500 of them. The rest came from either different parts of Holland or Germany.

My oldest ancestor was Gustavus Forteman, he died in 792 AD and was the father of Magnus Forteman, who is a legendary Frisian: Magnus Forteman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnus_Forteman)
Gustavus Forteman is my 36th generation ancestor.

My paternal lineage originally came from Germany, from places like Schüttorf and Emden. Both not far over the border from Holland though.

I think people put to much importance on their surname lineages though, those are just a small part of your heritage. All other lineages are just as important.

Among traditional American's at least cultural inheritance/kingroup identity/ethnic identity are transmitted in a patrilineal way, so the paternal line is the "most important" line to us, especially to groups like Cohee.

Sybren
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 12:58 PM
Among traditional American's at least cultural inheritance/kingroup identity/ethnic identity are transmitted in a patrilineal way, so the paternal line is the "most important" line to us, especially to groups like Cohee.
I understand that and you seem to know your stuff about your heritage. But i get the idea a lot of people who don't know much about their heritage put too much value in their paternal line, just because it is the line that simply determines their surname, while in reality it really is a thing of chances what determines your surname.

To me it is more about the big picture and where the majority of your ancestors came from.

My surname points to German ancestry, but still i don't feel German, i feel Frisian because the overwhelming majority of my ancestors hailed from Friesland, that's what i mean.

Norrøn
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 01:09 PM
http://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=107456&stc=1&d=1297083841

Thats all. The danish/norwegian part goes back to the 13/14 century, and the vinlanders are more recent(1870-1905). Found their records on Ellies-island, and their movement from checking family names from churches and death records. Actually found the more recent ones on facebook;)

Thusnelda
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 04:33 PM
Well, the "migration" history of my lineage is pretty boring: Effectively it´s just "migration" from village to village in the same region. :D

98% of my family line stems from this area, the Eastern Bavarian parts:

http://www.bayerwald.net/orte/bayerwald.jpg

I´ve got one single Swedish male ancestor during the Thirty Years War, that´s the only outer-Bavarian influence we know of. :)

wittwer
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 05:54 PM
In my family, it depends on which side of the family one tracks. As for the migration across the Atlantic, it's all Western European to North America. It starts about 1623 from England, 1720's from England, 1750's from Ireland, 1740's from Switzerland and 1849 from Germany and Austria.

Then in N.A. from Mass., Delaware., Pennsylavnia. into Maryland, Virgina (up the Shenandoah Valley)., through the Cumberland Gap into Kentucky, then later across the Ohio River into the Northwest Territory of Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois and lately west to California and south to Texas... ;)

Hersir
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 06:19 PM
None that I know of. As far as I know, none of my family emigrated abroad.

The sister of my grandmother moved to Sweden.

Leonhardt
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 06:25 PM
1)~1600 St. Galens, Switzerland

2)~1650 Kraichgau, Bavaria, they moved out of the mountains after Thirty Years War.

3)1733 on the ship Hope to Pennsylvania, US

4)~1850 moved to the Midwest, US


The other parts of my ancestry shipped over before 1900.

Hamar Fox
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 07:54 PM
Like other European members, my ancestors just moved from village to village. The longest migrations I know of was my great-great-grandmother's migration from Norfolk to Yorkshire and my great-grandmothers migration from central Ireland to Durham.

The silliest migration in my ancestry is the migration from the beautiful Keswick, Cumbria (where one lineage had lived for generations):

http://www.ukstudentlife.com/Travel/Tours/England/Keswick/Keswick.jpg

http://www.visitcumbria.com/simon/keswick-6181b.jpg

To Bradistan:

http://www.propertyinvesting.net/cgi-script/csNews/image_upload/specialreports_2edb.bradford.jpg

Although, of course, it wasn't Bradistan at the time. It was always an unaesthetic mill town, though. Still, I'm glad that lineage moved there just because it meant it soaked up more Yorkshire blood :D

I'd say about 80% or more of my lineages just circulated around Yorkshire for the last few hundred years, which is why I have such a large proportion of Yorkshire names in my ancestry: http://forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=1023655&postcount=126

The few lineages that exist outside of Yorkshire also stayed in those regions for generations: The Cumbrian lineage stays in just a few villages in Cumbria as far back as I can trace, and likewise for the Norfolk and central Irish lines. Like my Yorkshire ancestors, they also had regional Cumbrian or Norfolkian surnames.

Hilderinc
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 10:06 PM
My English line went from Boston, England, to Boston, Massachusetts in 1630 aboard the Winthrop fleet. Making them one of the first settlers of Boston. They moved around New England for a while, and I assume they ended up in Illinois to 'get rich quick' in the new western wilderness. Supposedly a cousin or relative or something traveled to Kentucky in the early 1600's, but I don't know much about this. All of my English ancestors were in the USA by 1680.

I can make a pretty accurate guess that my German line from Bohemia came over soon after WWI and the dissolution of Austria-Hungary.

The other stuff is not so interesting, my other German line and Norwegian line landed in Wisconsin and ended up in Illinois.

Granraude
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 10:12 PM
Sadly, not alot of information about my family is available, but to my knowledge, there may be some Swedish on my fathers side within the last 150 years.

Also, there may be some Italian on my mothers side. My maternal great-great-grandfather or so may have been an Italian sailor who got shipwrecked near Røst, Lofoten.

Loyalist
Tuesday, February 8th, 2011, 01:32 AM
I have a few more which I suppose are worthy of inclusion in this thread.

One of my paternal ancestors was a Dutchman from The Hague, who, in the 1640s, settled in the Dutch colony in Brazil (Nieuw-Holland). His eldest daughter, from whom I descend, was born in Recife, Pernambuco, in 1649, and baptized in the local Dutch Reformed Church. After the Portuguese seized the colony and expelled the Dutch, most returned to the Netherlands, but my branch instead headed to New Netherland (New York).

On the same side, another of my Huguenot ancestors, a native of Calais, fled to a Huguenot stronghold on the island of Martinique. He married another Huguenot woman, a Walloon, and, in 1645, left the Caribbean island for New Netherland, settling in Harlem, where their children married into Dutch families.


My English line went from Boston, England, to Boston, Massachusetts in 1630 aboard the Winthrop fleet. Making them one of the first settlers of Boston...

Some of my mother's forbears came over on the Winthrop Fleet. The ancestors in question were from small villages in Suffolk (Groton and Lavenham).

Finn
Tuesday, February 8th, 2011, 03:00 AM
Family all migrated to U.S. from Holland, Ferwert, Blige,Ameland, Amsterdam. First generation settled in Min, SD,.
Second generations headed west to WA,CA,. 3rd & 4th,
generations have spread out across the U.S.

Hammish
Wednesday, February 9th, 2011, 05:28 AM
I understand that and you seem to know your stuff about your heritage. But i get the idea a lot of people who don't know much about their heritage put too much value in their paternal line, just because it is the line that simply determines their surname, while in reality it really is a thing of chances what determines your surname.

To me it is more about the big picture and where the majority of your ancestors came from.

My surname points to German ancestry, but still i don't feel German, i feel Frisian because the overwhelming majority of my ancestors hailed from Friesland, that's what i mean.

You're not wrong Jorrit... And I envy you speaking Frisian.. I speak some Russian, Spanish, and German... but have always wanted to learn Frisian...

What's holding me back??? no one to talk to

Sybren
Wednesday, February 9th, 2011, 10:07 AM
Your not wrong Jorrit... And d I envy you speaking Frisian.. I speak some Russian, Spanish, and German... but have always wanted to learn Frisian...

What's holding me back??? no one to talk to
Well that is a good reason to hold back from learning it ;)

But if you change your mind, i know a few people who weren't Frisian themselves, but learned to speak it fluently. As long as you speak a Germanic language by yourself, i think it shouldn't be too hard to learn if you really go for it.

But i understand why you wouldn't, i myself would like to learn Swedish and improve my German, but i never do because who would i talk to...

Ralf
Thursday, February 10th, 2011, 01:58 AM
On my Mothers side, only in her generation have we moved to the south of England from untold generations of a foremost family of Border Reivers who still mainly hail from Newcastle.

My Fathers side is of more relevance and danger to the lies of the propoganderists, after the First World War, conditions where so bad for Germanic Prussians, who now found themselves citizens of Poland, that his parents had to flee West Prussia, leaving behind all thier property.

A shame both of my Grandparents are dead as I would have loved to know the extent of German persecution before Hitler came to the rescue of his people.
I hear stories of babies nailed to barns, that sort of thing, but I dont want to belive it was that bad if it was not, propogander on any side is of no use to me.

I understand thier are German books that record the level of persecution, but nothing translated so I can understand.
If anybody has read the true history, I would be most obliged to hear it.

My Prussian family fled to Westphalia.

Mööv
Tuesday, April 26th, 2011, 11:22 PM
Mittelbiberach (Baden-Württemberg) --> Branau (Schwäbische Turkei, Ungarn, 1755) --> Neu Pasua (Syrmien, 1794) --> Alt Pasua (Syrmien, ????)

That's as much as I managed to find out.

Barreldriver
Sunday, January 1st, 2012, 04:28 PM
I understand that and you seem to know your stuff about your heritage. But i get the idea a lot of people who don't know much about their heritage put too much value in their paternal line, just because it is the line that simply determines their surname, while in reality it really is a thing of chances what determines your surname.

To me it is more about the big picture and where the majority of your ancestors came from.

My surname points to German ancestry, but still i don't feel German, i feel Frisian because the overwhelming majority of my ancestors hailed from Friesland, that's what i mean.

A bit of a belated reply on my part, however your post is interesting and illustrates a cultural contrast between us as individuals.

I am curious if your viewpoint was something that you resolved to perpetuate due to your own reflections or if it was something passed on culturally?

For myself the emphasis on patrilinear line is very cultural and I cannot fathom thinking another way due to how I was raised, I cannot but suspect that this inspired some conflicts between my paternal and maternal family for in my fathers family the fathers line is most important, our customs and identity are inherited from father to son and I cannot view myself as connected to other lines in my pedigree outside of a biological connection based on that. This upsets my maternal family to a degree as they are competing with my paternal family for loyalty and their situation was that where the pater familias was a deserter and thus they have not the connection I and my father and his father so on had with their lineage.

When it gets down to it and if SHTF I would take up a defense on the behalf of my father's family and others of my paternal root as that connection is the most consistent and unbroken connection a son can have where I come from, this does not mean I do not care for my maternal family simply that my ultimate loyalty lies with pater familias and others who share common paternal root with the pater familias.

When asked who I am I state first that I am a man of my family name/surname, second that I am an Anglo-Tennessean a reflection of the afore mentioned, third a Confederate not only because of descent but also because of an actual desire to perpetuate that cause.

Unity Mitford
Sunday, January 1st, 2012, 05:32 PM
Some Flemish and some Saxon ancestry on my Dad's side.