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Northern Paladin
Tuesday, January 4th, 2011, 08:50 PM
Please name your favorite Viking and include a picture if you could find one.

Mine is Egill Skallagrķmsson, because of his physical strength and the fact that he was a warrior poet, a rare combination.

tomtom
Tuesday, January 4th, 2011, 11:57 PM
My favorite Viking is Leif Ericsson, discoverer of Vinland, son of Erik the Red.

Wychaert
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 12:14 AM
When I was a little boy, me and my family went to Danmark for vacation.
Then, In the middle of nowhere we stopped by a verry small museum.
It was made for a Bog-body, a girl from about 18 years old, She was found there in that region.
I'm looking for years for some info about that girl, couldnt find anything.
I cant remember her name neither the place where she was found.
The local archeo's made a painting how she must look like at the time.
That image has never left my mind...

well she is my favorite..

(Anyone from Denmark who knows I'm talking about?)

Hersir
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 12:36 AM
When I was a little boy, me and my family went to Danmark for vacation.
Then, In the middle of nowhere we stopped by a verry small museum.
It was made for a Bog-body, a girl from about 18 years old, She was found there in that region.
I'm looking for years for some info about that girl, couldnt find anything.
I cant remember her name neither the place where she was found.
The local archeo's made a painting how she must look like at the time.
That image has never left my mind...

well she is my favorite..

(Anyone from Denmark who knows I'm talking about?)

http://www.tollundmanden.dk/ellingkvinden.asp

Google translate: http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=no&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&sl=da&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.tollundmanden.dk%2Fel lingkvinden.asp

http://www.google.com/search?client=opera&rls=nn&q=ellingkvinnen&sourceid=opera&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8#sclient=psy&hl=no&client=opera&hs=dTx&rls=nn&source=hp&q=ellingkvinden&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=&pbx=1&fp=81409d99ad857e2b

I think this is the one you're looking for:thumbup

Žoreišar
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 12:59 AM
I first thought of the 'Egtved girl' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egtved_Girl), though Hersir's suggestion is more likely the correct one.

Either way, aren't those people a bit too old to be considered 'Vikings'?

Wychaert
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 01:01 AM
http://www.tollundmanden.dk/ellingkvinden.asp

Google translate: http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=no&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&sl=da&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.tollundmanden.dk%2Fel lingkvinden.asp

http://www.google.com/search?client=opera&rls=nn&q=ellingkvinnen&sourceid=opera&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8#sclient=psy&hl=no&client=opera&hs=dTx&rls=nn&source=hp&q=ellingkvinden&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=&pbx=1&fp=81409d99ad857e2b

I think this is the one you're looking for:thumbup

Well thanks.
I allready visit those sites, but then I saw a familiar name! Egtved Girl!
This is the one!

Wychaert
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 01:04 AM
I first thought of the 'Egtved girl' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egtved_Girl), though Hersir's suggestion is more likely the correct one.

Either way, aren't those people a bit too old to be considered 'Vikings'?

Yes, there are to old. but in my memories I thought she was a viking.
Sorry for that.

Huginn ok Muninn
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 01:11 AM
My favorite Viking is Leif Ericsson, discoverer of Vinland, son of Erik the Red.

Not mine, and here's why...

He did not remain here and colonize this land... he had better weapons and technology than the skrelings, so he should have just beaten them and taken over, but he didn't. He even ran from battle on one occasion, which is especially pathetic for a viking. He had the chance to make history and put his foot in the door for our people to take over this continent 500 years before Columbus, but he failed to do so.

My favorite viking is Danish king Cnut the Great, who conquered England and united that kingdom with his own.

Elessar
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 01:14 AM
:D
Johan Hegg
http://www.metal-observer.com/pics/amonamarth/AA_johann_hegg_1.jpg


He did not remain here and colonize this land... he had better weapons and technology than the skrelings, so he should have just beaten them and taken over, but he didn't. He even ran from battle on one occasion, which is especially pathetic for a viking. He had the chance to make history and put his foot in the door for our people to take over this continent 500 years before Columbus, but he failed to do so.


I hold this same view as well. The act of finding America itself was admirable, but the ends didn't justify the means

Northern Paladin
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 05:13 AM
Although I admire the Vikings for their strength, courage, and intelligence, I must say, I'm not a big fan of their self-destructive nature.

I'm referring to the feuds, which claimed the lives of too beautiful Nordic males in complete vain. Feuds that started over something as trivial as a whale carcass... feuds that lasted for multiple generations, indeed some of the Vikings didn't even know how a feud got started, yet the pointless killing, utter fratricide continued. This broke my heart when I read the Sagas, how much stronger would they have been if they hadn't killed each other off for no good reason? How much stronger would we be today, if those genes had survived?

Hersir
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 05:54 AM
:D





I hold this same view as well. The act of finding America itself was admirable, but the ends didn't justify the means

He didnt find America, he is credited as the first norseman who sat their foot on American soil.

Elessar
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 05:56 AM
He didnt find America, he is credited as the first norseman who sat their foot on American soil.

Well, yes of course, but you get the idea ;)

Ediruc
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 06:17 AM
Hrafnkel from the Hrafnkel's Saga.

Very good read. His story inspired me to attempt to write my own Viking/Norse sagas.

flāneur
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 08:17 AM
Charles Lindbergh.

Ardito
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 05:00 PM
But there was one of the Norwegians who withstood the English folk, so that they could not pass over the bridge, nor complete the victory. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Stamford_Bridge)

I can't help but respect a man who killed that many of my ancestors.

Thusnelda
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 08:52 PM
Thorwald Eriksson, the brother of Leif Eriksson. He was an adventurer like his more famous brother and he made contact with the first native Americans and died honorably in a battle against some of them. Their father, Erik the red, is quite famous as well and had an interesting biography. This family had exploration and adventure in the bloodline! :thumbsup

Norrųn
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 10:10 PM
Harald Hardraade. ;)

Oski
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 10:25 PM
Rurik

http://img405.imageshack.us/img405/8365/450px1000rurik.jpg (http://img405.imageshack.us/i/450px1000rurik.jpg/)

Varangian chieftain who gained control of Ladoga in 862, built the Holmgard settlement near Novgorod, and founded the Rurik Dynasty which ruled Kievan Rus and then Galicia-Volhynia until the 14th and Muscovy until the 16th century.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rurik

King Sitric
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 10:30 PM
King Sitric of course! ... (aka King Sigtrygg II Silkbeard Olafsson of Dublin)

....oh and Hagar

Žoreišar
Thursday, January 6th, 2011, 02:15 AM
Although I admire the Vikings for their strength, courage, and intelligence, I must say, I'm not a big fan of their self-destructive nature.

I'm referring to the feuds, which claimed the lives of too beautiful Nordic males in complete vain. Feuds that started over something as trivial as a whale carcass... feuds that lasted for multiple generations, indeed some of the Vikings didn't even know how a feud got started, yet the pointless killing, utter fratricide continued. This broke my heart when I read the Sagas, how much stronger would they have been if they hadn't killed each other off for no good reason? How much stronger would we be today, if those genes had survived?Perhaps it was exactly this "destructive nature" which made the Norsemen so strong?

Ardito
Thursday, January 6th, 2011, 03:50 AM
Perhaps it was exactly this "destructive nature" which made the Norsemen so strong?

Indeed. Living in that kind of furnace cannot possibly hurt your genes.

Northern Paladin
Thursday, January 6th, 2011, 04:06 AM
Indeed. Living in that kind of furnace cannot possibly hurt your genes.

Yes, I see what you mean.

Arditi
Sunday, February 6th, 2011, 09:47 AM
Harald Hardraade

Ingvaeonic
Sunday, February 6th, 2011, 03:44 PM
...My favorite viking is Danish king Cnut the Great, who conquered England and united that kingdom with his own.

Seconded. Though Guthrum, king of the Danes of the Danelaw runs a close second to Cnut. The Vikings were constructive and productive barbarians. But they made one big mistake: allowing themselves to be Christianised.

Ardito
Sunday, February 6th, 2011, 04:14 PM
Seconded. Though Guthrum, king of the Danes of the Danelaw runs a close second to Cnut. The Vikings were constructive and productive barbarians. But they made one big mistake: allowing themselves to be Christianised.

They hardly allowed it, it was forced upon them. If they'd converted voluntarily, there'd be a case for returning to heathenry, but I don't believe you can really argue with the worship of a superior god of war.

Ingvaeonic
Sunday, February 6th, 2011, 04:24 PM
They hardly allowed it, it was forced upon them. If they'd converted voluntarily, there'd be a case for returning to heathenry, but I don't believe you can really argue with the worship of a superior god of war.

Semantics. The Christianisation of Scandinavia and of the Vikings was piecemeal, as it necessarily had to be, various conversions were coerced while some were undertaken willingly. All right then, I'll reword it: The Vikings made one big mistake: adopting Christianity.

Ardito
Sunday, February 6th, 2011, 04:35 PM
Semantics. The Christianisation of Scandinavia and of the Vikings was piecemeal, as it necessarily had to be, various conversions were coerced while some were undertaken willingly. All right then, I'll reword it: The Vikings made one big mistake: adopting Christianity.

I'm honestly not sure how you think what you said refuted what I said.

Ingvaeonic
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 11:34 AM
I'm honestly not sure how you think what you said refuted what I said.

Who said I was trying to refute what you wrote? I was attempting to make my original statement clearer in response to your post.

Ardito
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 04:53 PM
Who said I was trying to refute what you wrote? I was attempting to make my original statement clearer in response to your post.

I apologise for the poor wording. I am still not sure what point it is you're trying to make.

Berrocscir
Monday, February 7th, 2011, 05:13 PM
:thumbup

http://www.thewashingmachinepost.net/cover_images_38/noggin.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noggin_the_Nog

Northern Paladin
Friday, May 27th, 2011, 01:11 AM
great choices so far!!!

Valknut
Saturday, September 10th, 2011, 01:03 AM
Hardraada,

Imagine this guys life! First battle and blooded at 15 at Stiklestad with Olaf the Stout (St. Olaf). Travels to Kiev and serves as a merc for Yaroslav. Travels to Miklagard and takes over the Varangian Guard. Rises to the very top of the bodyguard for the Eastern Roman Empire. Allegedly blinds one of the deposed emperors himself. After years of serving and battling across the middle east and Greece(this is a Norwegian lad in the 11th century) returns to the North and picks up a Russian bride on the way. Within a year joins a very short lived partnership with Magnus and takes over as King of Norway. He perpetuates a 20 year war with Svein of Denmark to a stalemate. Attempts an invasion and take over of England and dies a warriors death at Stanford Bridge. The guy is in his 50’s. An old man for those times. He would rather die than retreat or wait reinforcements. Basically he knew what was coming and he chose to go down in a blaze of glory.
What I try to imagine is the mind set of people like him in those days. It is almost inconceivable for a modern man to do so. Think of how big the world must have seemed but he attempted to dominate it. Think of the human life and suffering that he caused to reach his goals. Nothing to him. Think of the innumerable battles he was in. They must have been like slaughter houses with the kind of weapons and warfare and rules of conduct. No post traumatic shock there. He only wanted more and to die the same way. Put yourself in a room with this guy. Could you look him in the eye and carry on a conversation? And what would that be about? Stress at work? Hahahaha

Harald Hardraada
We come from the land of the ice and snow
from the midnight sun where the hot springs blow
The hammer of the gods will drive our ships to new lands
To fight the horde and sing and cry, Valhalla, I am coming