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View Full Version : (How) Do You See Wales as Part of 'Germanic Britain'?



Unregistered
Tuesday, November 30th, 2010, 10:13 PM
Hello,
I am welsh and I discovered this forum while studying for a project about 'National Identity'. I would be interested to hear your opinions about Wales, in particular how you see it as part of 'germanic britain'.

The Welsh were original inhabitants of britain, and their ancestors built the stone circles and burial mounds that are a distinctive feature of the landscape - at that stage they weren't celts or 'druids' as is often thought, they came much later. They were pushed back to their current position, once they had been 'Celtified' ( the celts themselves retreating to wales from german tribes) by successive waves of invaders from germanic lands, such as the anglo-saxons. Even once they got to Wales they weren't safe, as distinctly non Welsh place names such as Skomer, Anglesey, Tenby, Sweinsey/swansea (all norse) show, and the Landsker line divided the English speakers in south wales from the Welsh speakers in the north. Do you see still see the welsh as 'natives' and the saxons/normans/danes as invaders/settlers, therefore making Britain more like say the USA or N.Z, or is it too far back in history to be important?

In Wales it's generally felt we are a quite a different nation to England, and if anything this is becoming more appartent as more people learn the language. It even is hoped one day that its will be used as the conversational language of most people, and the government has spent much taxpayer money on bilingual schemes, in a region with high unemployment and poor health. Most welsh see themselves as celts because its 'cool' and a lot are into the New Age Druid stuff. But the reality is both welsh and english culture is being drowned out by McAmericanism and the 'multiculturalism' that it entails; would you support a 'white uprising' that included the Welsh, even if we are not germanic?
I really sense an uprising coming, the coalition will fall apart and this is the best opportunity there has been in a long time to overthrow the status quo of capitalist bankers that control everything. Just look at the protests over the past few weeks, and that is only a few students....
Many thanks
Peredur

By the way, do any of you like that band Leaves Eyes? Somehow this seems the sort of website that their fans might go on. They are one of my favourite bands and I saw them live.

Ĉmeric
Tuesday, November 30th, 2010, 10:31 PM
Thee might be small pockets of Anglo-Saxons in Wales, like around Haverford West, but Wales is mostly Celtic. Its national identity is Cymru Celtic. Historically there is no basis for an "Germanic Wales", unlike Lowland Scotland which did have a heavy Germanic influence as opposed to Highland Scotland.

Angelcynn Beorn
Thursday, December 2nd, 2010, 06:38 PM
I wouldn't say "Britain" is Germanic. Only England, lowland Scotland, the Loyalist parts of Ulster and a few small places here and there, are actually Germanic. The rest of the British isles are Celtic.

wittwer
Thursday, December 2nd, 2010, 08:23 PM
Some of my forebears came from Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire (in the 1720's); aka Little England beyond Wales. Anyway, the Welsh have always been Welsh and always will be. As for Wales integration into "Britain" proper the following may put it all into perspective:

"Britain is comprised of the Scots, who kept the Sabbath Holy and anything else they could get their bloody hands on. Then there are the Irish who have never known exactly what they wanted, but were always willing to fight for it anyway. Then there are the Welsh who have always been on their knees and at everyone elses. Finally, there are the English who have always been a self made race, much to the relief of the Almighty." ;)

The question becomes, "Does Wales want to be part and parcel of a "Germanic" Britian"?

Angelcynn Beorn
Thursday, December 2nd, 2010, 09:15 PM
"Britain is comprised of the Scots, who kept the Sabbath Holy and anything else they could get their bloody hands on. Then there are the Irish who have never known exactly what they wanted, but were always willing to fight for it anyway. Then there are the Welsh who have always been on their knees and at everyone elses. Finally, there are the English who have always been a self made race, much to the relief of the Almighty." ;)

:P

Where did you get that from?

wittwer
Thursday, December 2nd, 2010, 11:20 PM
:P

Where did you get that from?

When I was growing up we had a Grammar and Composition teacher/History teacher who was educated at Oxford who had us memorize it as a part of our lessons on British History. Puts it all in a nutshell just about... :D

Ĉmeric
Thursday, December 2nd, 2010, 11:31 PM
I wouldn't say "Britain" is Germanic. Only England, lowland Scotland, the Loyalist parts of Ulster and a few small places here and there, are actually Germanic. The rest of the British isles are Celtic.But England makes up the bulk of the UK population. 50 million out of 60 million. And the phrases "Britain" or "United Kingdom" are used interchangeably with England in a way Scotland, Wales or Ulster is not. Britain isn't all Germanic but is mostly Germanic.

Genfluss
Friday, December 3rd, 2010, 12:36 AM
I've always seen Wales as more a part of the Celtic fringes of Europe, just like Cornwall and Ireland. Parts of Scotland seem more Germanic like the Lowlands.

Diarmuid
Friday, December 3rd, 2010, 03:13 PM
To be honest I really don't know that much about Wales, though I've always thought of the Welsh as mostly Celtic. And I really don't think they have had much Germanic influence. Interesting article I found: http://www.economicexpert.com/a/Germanic:peoples.htm

Catterick
Friday, February 3rd, 2017, 07:47 AM
Wales is Celtic save for places like Pembrokeshire where settlement was heavy. Along the borders if anything Welsh culture spilled into places such as Herefordshire and Shropshire more than the other way round. Sadly over time the English state language began to eclipse Welsh in Wales (Wales was officially within England until the 1960s).

Germaniathane
Saturday, March 18th, 2017, 07:56 PM
Wales is predominantly Celtic with some Germanic admixture. 30% of the Welsh DNA is Anglo-Saxon, according to a recent study in 2016. This couldn't be avoided, since there was interaction with the mighty English or Anglo-Saxon rulers and settlers throughout the years.

Indo-European
Friday, July 28th, 2017, 02:10 AM
The Welsh are no doubt predominately Celtic. Many Welsh people still speak their native language. But Welsh people definitely have some Germanic ancestry as well from the Anglo-Saxons and Normans. I am not sure how many Norse settled and remained in Wales during the Viking Age but I am inclined to think that they mostly raided the Welsh and took some captives and moved on. The Isle of Man was much more strongly influenced by the Norse than Wales. The people there today are a Norse/Celtic blend.