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Wittmann
Monday, November 15th, 2010, 09:11 AM
Well I have some pretty bad news, my great-great-grandfather who came to America from Germany, came from what is the modern day Polish zone, making me Slavic, although he served as an officer in the German military. Does that mean I am now no longer allowed to remain a member of Skadi, and are my beliefs/efforts in Germanic Preservationism for naught? I can't get rid of these darn genetics, so am I really being fair in my desire to move to Germany and such? Would it be wrong to marry a pure German woman?

Teutonic
Monday, November 15th, 2010, 09:39 AM
Well I have some pretty bad news, my great-great-grandfather who came to America from Germany, came from what is the modern day Polish zone, making me Slavic, although he served as an officer in the German military. Does that mean I am now no longer allowed to remain a member of Skadi, and are my beliefs/efforts in Germanic Preservationism for naught? I can't get rid of these darn genetics, so am I really being fair in my desire to move to Germany and such? Would it be wrong to marry a pure German woman?



No you are not being fair if you chose to move to Germany with slavic blood. Then you want to marry a German girl? We have enough mixed kids here in Germany as it is, adding to the mix is no help, and if you really care about your German side, then sometimes the best thing to do is to stay away. I am no moderator nor you, only you can decide if you should or will remain on skadi. You do realize that what is now Poland was once a big piece of German land called Prussia right?

Wittmann
Monday, November 15th, 2010, 09:52 AM
No you are not being fair if you chose to move to Germany with slavic blood. Then you want to marry a German girl? We have enough mixed kids here in Germany as it is, adding to the mix is no help, and if you really care about your German side, then sometimes the best thing to do is to stay away. I am no moderator nor you, only you can decide if you should or will remain on skadi. You do realize that what is now Poland was once a big piece of German land called Prussia right?

Yes, of course I know that, my great great grandfather served as an officer in the Prussian Armed Forces before moving to the United States before the outbreak of WW1, about 10 years before I think.

Stormraaf
Monday, November 15th, 2010, 10:05 AM
You'll only wear out your welcome if you continue to imagine yourself to be Slavic, which at this point, from what you've told us, sounds somewhat unwarranted to me.


Well I have some pretty bad news, my great-great-grandfather who came to America from Germany, came from what is the modern day Polish zone, making me Slavic, although he served as an officer in the German military.

Are you sure that means he was a Pole? Have you only learned what area he was from, or is your conclusion based on more detailed findings, like his family history or the language he spoke?

If he really was a Slav, how do you suppose having 1/16th Slavic ancestry makes you Slavic?

Personally I think a misdirected sense of preservationism on your part is partially to blame for this impasse - you're American, not German. You're part of a folk which, being a recombination of different European ethnicities, and despite minor non-Germanic components, is racially Europid and pan-ethnically Germanic. A 1/16th Slavic ancestry does not detract from that.

Wittmann
Monday, November 15th, 2010, 10:25 AM
No, he spoke Polish, I am pretty certain of that. Well I have never imagined myself as Slavic, I have quite fair skin along with traditional Faelid features of a strong Germanic build. Well my other 15/16th is German, as my mother's family moved to Switzerland and then the USA, so we all came from Prussia. I have always considered myself more German then American and really don't identify with the American people or culture, I yearn to return to my fatherland and serve in the GJ.

Ralf
Monday, November 15th, 2010, 10:43 AM
If he came from Prussia, are you sure he wasnt Prussian?

Wittmann
Monday, November 15th, 2010, 11:10 AM
If he came from Prussia, are you sure he wasnt Prussian?

I'm not sure if that is a racial category, as it was not an ethnically based nation, he had Prussian citizenship, he was a military officer, but I know he spoke Polish.

Sigurd
Monday, November 15th, 2010, 12:42 PM
This makes you what, 1/16 or 6.25% Polish and 15/16 or 93.25% German --- half of working-class Viennese folk would hard pressed to claim that for themselves. Focus on the vast majority of your heritage, it's not like you just found out your dad was Jewish. ;)

How are you so certain he spoke Polish though? If it's a surname then it doesn't mean anything at all. I know a man who is 1/16 Polish and 15/16 German (like you claim for yourself), and his children will be 1/32 and 31/32, respectively --- yet will still bear the Polish surname carried on through the paternal line. It don't mean anything if it's just a surname, it could have happened any four hundred ways. :P

Either way, what Stormraaf said. The influence is minor enough, and you're talking German-American not German, where many of your fellow Americans will find something non-Germanic some far time back somewhere in the woodpile without detracting from their overall Germanic identification and demeanor. You might have found yourself having difficulties joining the SS-VT, but that's about it. :shrug

Certainly it'd be idiotic if you began to identify with part of your ethnic make-up that is so far back that your eldest living relative might barely have ten years of living memory of. That'd be a bit like all those annoying suddenly appearing "Irish Americans" whose 9x-great-grandfather had an Irish Wolfhound and believed in Leprechauns. :D

Thorolf
Monday, November 15th, 2010, 01:39 PM
Do you have any info about his parents? I mean if he grew up in Prussia, you could be even less slav than you think. Could it be possible his father was polish and his mother was Germanic? Or maybe it goes farther back, maybe his fathers father was polish and that ones wife Germanic. Either way its at most 1/16 of your ancestry its not your like your half black or half jew or something. I imagine many of the American Skadi members cant even claim that much purity.

Strijdraaf
Monday, November 15th, 2010, 02:34 PM
I wouldn't be too bothered with having some Slavic blood in me if I were you, Kadski. Children of colonialism such as yourself, as an American, and myself, as a Boer, are quite mixed in terms of sub-races and nationalities. It's really not something I would bother myself with unduly if I were you. I've got about 15% French heritage and you don't see me denying my Germanic roots.

wittwer
Monday, November 15th, 2010, 02:45 PM
I always thought, that "banning" was a disciplinary action brought against those who violated the guidelines of the site. Not an action against the "blood" of those who arent' "pure" enough. I doubt if anyone can prove that their "blood" is of the "purest" nature. Whether they be European or American... ;)

As it stands, I wouldn't worry about it. Germanics is a cultural thing, not a "pure blood" thing. Remember, it's all about the Leitkultur, not the "Neo-Nazi Aryanism" of the recent past.

Thusnelda
Monday, November 15th, 2010, 02:57 PM
1/16 Slavic ancestry is no reason to leave the board or to feel substandard in any way. And I´m not even sure your great-great-grandfather was Polish. Do you know about the history of former Prussian territories in nowadays Poland? Germans by ethnicity and culture were the majority there until they were expelled after the second world war. And if your great-great-grandfather was German enough to be an officer within the Prussian military, you´re Germanic enough for our board with ease. ;)

Ediruc
Tuesday, November 16th, 2010, 01:18 AM
fellow Americans will find something non-Germanic some far time back somewhere in the woodpile without detracting from their overall Germanic identification and demeanor. You might have found yourself having difficulties joining the SS-VT, but that's about it.

Sigurd, thanks.

Somewhere down my family tree is an Irishwoman; but, of course I don't let that tiny bit of heritage entirely destroy my Germanic preservationist position, and substitute it with Celtic preservationist thought.

I would definitely be begging you guys to give me the boot if that were to ever happen :P

Nachtengel
Tuesday, November 16th, 2010, 10:27 AM
I think you're still Germanic. In Eastern Germany there are Germans who have a small amount of Slavic ancestry and some Slavic surnames, but they're still German. It would be ridiculous however to count yourself as a Slav with so little ancestry and practically no heritage, because I assume no Polish customs or language were passed down to you. So you can't claim to be Slavic. That's if you have Slavic ancestry to begin with. It sounds more like your ancestor was an ethnic German and he could have been bilingual, like it was the case with many ethnic Germans in Eastern/Slavic Europe. So if he spoke Polish it doesn't necessarily meant he didn't speak German also.

Anyhow the question is now if how you're going to treat this new discovery. I hope you're not going to begin justifying all Germano-Slavic mixing and parading 'hot' Polish women as good mixing material, because they're better than Negroes, after all. Mixed people tend to go down that path. There used to be a part Italian guy here with an obsession for Southern 'beauties'. Just realize that 1/16 is little compared to your rest, especially if your rest fully belongs to only one ethnicity. You are less mixed than many other of your countrymen. But assuming you are indeed 1/16 Slavic, it doesn't mean it's ideal. However it doesn't make you non-Germanic but it doesn't mean either that it's acceptable for Germans to mix with Slavs. You aren't responsible for the mixing, if it happened in your family. But you have a say, not to mix with a Polish woman yourself. It's up to you if you're going to continue counting yourself as Germanic or you'll make room for a new Slavo-Germanic identity, or rather pseudo-identity since you're not acquainted with Slavic identity.

Do you speak German, by the way? Has any German heritage been passed down by your family?

The Aesthete
Tuesday, November 16th, 2010, 10:52 AM
Racial identity is far more important to me than cultural

Many Nordish folk amongst Poles but less than the Germanic countries like Sweden, Germany and England etc, especially central types like the Hallstatt Nordid.

However there are also quite a few Poles who aren’t Nordish

So they should generally not mix, because it would racially damage Germanics.

Personally I don’t mind the Poles they are smarter with their immigration policy than my country.

As said certain parts of Poland were parts of Germany which lost territory after the world wars. So your grandparent may in fact be German.

If you posted a picture of your grandparent and he was Hallstatt I don’t think you would hear much, but if he was Ladogan a totally different story

Anyway you are more Germanic than other

Sissi
Tuesday, November 16th, 2010, 10:58 AM
I think before thinking of yourself as Slavic and questioning your place in the Germanic cause, you should remember that genealogy isn't an accurate science. Do more research to find more details about your greatgreatgrandfather if possible, before jumping to conclusions.

I think there should be room in our cause for people who grew up thinking of themselves as Germanic, "fought for" the Germanic cause, but found out later they had other European ancestry. Their identity is Germanic and they shouldn't be blamed for something they didn't know or was hidden from them. But of course provided they wish to stay Germanic. It's normal if you develop a bit of identity crisis and questioning right now, but after a while things should become stabilized and I think your identity should be clear to you again.

No offense meant to Americans, but I think many of you act too superficially in what regards culture. A Polish greatgreatgrandfather and his genes doesn't make one Polish. A Faelid phenotype doesn't make one German. There is more to European national identities than that. Of course the genes and the race are essential components too, but without culture, different European nations wouldn't exist to the degree they do. You can find Faelid phenotypes in Poland, too, and you can find East or West Baltic phenotypes in Germany. But if you swapped the two, if the Faelid Pole were to move to Germany the next day, the Germans would see a difference.

theTasmanian
Tuesday, November 16th, 2010, 12:20 PM
Have you had a DNA test?

As far as i know my Grand father was a Prussian born in Prussia under Prussian/German rule and he said his mother was German but considering we cant even find records(Polish or German so far) of him we don't really know.....i might have some for of Baltic(old Prussian)/Slavic to me But my Grand mother and Grand father where both very strict in teaching us German "ways" even if we live in Australia ;)

my mother side are Anglo-Celt so i still have a goodly part of Germanic'ness ( :D ) from that side if nothing else

You decide where you sit but you will not be a hypocrite if you choose the "right" side ;)

Sigurd
Tuesday, November 16th, 2010, 12:29 PM
Have you had a DNA test?

A DNA test will have a difficulty establishing what is a Polonised German and what is a Germanised Pole. ;)

theTasmanian
Tuesday, November 16th, 2010, 09:20 PM
A DNA test will have a difficulty establishing what is a Polonised German and what is a Germanised Pole. ;)

True and a good point but it will show if there is any Pole there....or IF it was Baltic(old Prussian or Lithuanian) ;)

But again its which side he bats for and as he is here and the majority is Germanic he's fine:thumbup

Fyrgenholt
Tuesday, November 16th, 2010, 09:49 PM
If it makes you feel any better, Slavic paganism is quite interesting ;)

The mass majority of your ancestry is German and that should be sufficient. Regardless of that, though, I would understand you to be American or a German American rather than a German in the ethno-nationalistic sense, but that should speak for itself and stands regardless of Slavic ancestry. There's nothing wrong with being American.

Sigurd
Tuesday, November 16th, 2010, 10:05 PM
True and a good point but it will show if there is any Pole there....or IF it was Baltic(old Prussian or Lithuanian) ;)

1. Haplotype testing cannot clearly reveal this as much in non-isolated populations, current haplotypes were created before the ethnogenesis of the respective Northwestern-IE branches.

2. Haplotype testing finds out the make-up of one given ancestor that put their mark on you. For yDNA that's your father's father's father's father's + add potentially 200 generations. Notice the thread on Hitler's haplogroup and the sensationalist uproar they make from it.

Thorburn
Wednesday, November 17th, 2010, 04:21 AM
I have always considered myself more German then American and really don't identify with the American people or culture, I yearn to return to my fatherland and serve in the GJ. Serving voluntarily in the army of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) is the wrong way for any German, no matter from where he hails, to express his patriotism. The FRG is a hostile de facto regime created by Germany's enemies after WW2 in direct violation of international law and illegally usurps parts of the territory of the German Reich. One of the declared purposes of its army is to defend the basic law, the inner status quo and the mere existence of the FRG itself. Like no other institutions, the FRG bundeswehr and its subdivisions represent the subjugation of the German people by its enemies through brute force.

Northern Paladin
Wednesday, November 17th, 2010, 05:36 AM
I don't think most true Slavs are to Germanics what Capoid people are to negroes (simmilar in apperance - supefficially, but of a completely different race), therefore you should be okay, unless you can prove that your g-grandparent was an armenoid/mongoloid/mediterranid mongrel slav.

MCP3
Wednesday, November 17th, 2010, 11:58 AM
No, he spoke Polish, I am pretty certain of that. Well I have never imagined myself as Slavic, I have quite fair skin along with traditional Faelid features of a strong Germanic build. Well my other 15/16th is German, as my mother's family moved to Switzerland and then the USA, so we all came from Prussia. I have always considered myself more German then American and really don't identify with the American people or culture, I yearn to return to my fatherland and serve in the GJ.

You are what you want to be, thus either German or Polish.
All European Nations are mixed, there is no question about that.
But each is composed of a different mixture.
http://www.stormfront.org/forum/t750845/#post8617521

The Germans for example are a mix of Germanic tribes, with Dinaric (Roman descendants) elements in the South, Slavic/Wends in the East.

Sigurd
Wednesday, November 17th, 2010, 02:11 PM
The Germans for example are a mix of Germanic tribes, with Dinaric (Roman descendants) elements in the South, Slavic/Wends in the East.

How Dinarids happened is disputed, some - myself included - hold that it and Alpinisation are merely a process than can happen to any population to a varying extent; I have known Norwegians with decided Dinarid influence, and it'd be difficult to explain that one away with admixture. ;)

Other than this --- almost unmixed Dinarids here happen only in the back valleys, where Romans felt fairly uncomfortable settling. So you'd basically have to link that to (later culturally and linguistically Romanised) pre-Roman survivors - since the Celts were more plain-dwellers than anything as well, it only leaves the pre-Roman, pre-Celtic, pre-Germanic East-Alpine Indo-Europeans. :P

MCP3
Wednesday, November 17th, 2010, 02:34 PM
How Dinarids happened is disputed, some - myself included - hold that it and Alpinisation are merely a process than can happen to any population to a varying extent; I have known Norwegians with decided Dinarid influence, and it'd be difficult to explain that one away with admixture. ;)

Other than this --- almost unmixed Dinarids here happen only in the back valleys, where Romans felt fairly uncomfortable settling. So you'd basically have to link that to (later culturally and linguistically Romanised) pre-Roman survivors - since the Celts were more plain-dwellers than anything as well, it only leaves the pre-Roman, pre-Celtic, pre-Germanic East-Alpine Indo-Europeans. :P
My point is to show that genetic composition is not all, but language and culture add a lot. And the German Culture/Language is still dominant in the "Higher World" of Classic Arts, Music. Even in the US over 50% of all Church music was created by German composers.

So who were the least, and who were the most fanatical Nazis?
Out of memory: The highest NSDAP membership rate with 35% of the registered voters was in the Sudetengau, the second most "pro-NS" Gau was Ostpreussen with still over 22% membership rate. The least fanatical Nazis were in the Western Gaus, Cologne-Aachen was lowest with only 8% membership. What i am going to say is, that 2 highly intermixed with Slavs (East-Prussia= 800.000 Masurs, also Kashubs, as well as descendants of Teutonic Knights and many Calvinists from the NL, and Huguenots that found shelter there under Frederick I) and the Sudetengermans (originally German-Austrians with high intermix of Slavic Wends/Czechs) were the MOST fanatical NS followers. I am going to say that this intermixing with Slavs evidently did not harm the Germans, there were no loyality problems with
Masurs, Kashubs, Silesians (this Ger-Pol mix aka "Wasserpolacken") or Sorbs in the 2 WWs.

Teutonic
Wednesday, November 17th, 2010, 02:57 PM
No, he spoke Polish, I am pretty certain of that. Well I have never imagined myself as Slavic, I have quite fair skin along with traditional Faelid features of a strong Germanic build. Well my other 15/16th is German, as my mother's family moved to Switzerland and then the USA, so we all came from Prussia. I have always considered myself more German then American and really don't identify with the American people or culture, I yearn to return to my fatherland and serve in the GJ.


If you have always considered yourself German then that is what you are!! Do not let some people on this board who are NOT German tell you otherwise. The fact is, ONLY your German kin, should ones telling you anything on the subject..I have read many instances on the subject, read about and watched when the wall fell, and some women from west Berlin telling der spiegel, that she doesnt consider the east Germans, German anymore!! I thought what?? First of all they are not, no were they ever east Germans, that is Central Germany and because they were seperated for a brief time that makes them less German? QUATSCH!! Our people have had a million damn lies and brainwashing forced upon us for so long now that some of us do not know what to think anymore.. But I think those are only the weak ones, as I have never encountered that in my life, only so far read about it.Our people have been to me just like my mother, father, uncles and aunts, cousins, nothing but kind, loving and genuine to me.. I have respect for the English but when it comes to German things keep your mouths shut, because they do not concern you!! For you to tell one of my brothers where he belongs or what he is, only fills we with scorn for you..What you (English) along with the Americans did to us Germans and Germany will forever resonate in my German blood and heart..

Think about it our Volk have been tore apart so many damn times and our Vaterland cut up so many times there are going to be us Germans spread out throughout the world..From talking to my family as a kid and learning about how the Americans treated us and viewed us and did to us not just in the USA, but Germany, then turning a blind eye at the autrocities they commited and never talk about, its all hypocritical lies.

I think if you are respectful of Germany and Love our people and Fatherland more than anything then your rightful place is here in your German Fatherland.. You know in your heart, if you are a German or not, that is one thing I never questioned as a kid growing up in the USA, the thing I constantly questioned is wheather or not I was American, I never was nor will I ever be American.I have had many conversations with my grandfathers, my father, and uncles and one thing that my grandfather told me as a kid when I told him I do not like the Americans nor do I care about the usa, I said I love only Germany and our German people, he said you are a German and a patriot and to never lose that!!..Most of my family is southern German but I think there is a bit of Prussian blood in me as well, not as much as you and for that I am a little jealous:-) Na; I love every part of Germany that our German kin come from:-)

I hope some German language and culture was passed down to you, and that if you do come to Germany you work selflessly to make this land better in everyway possible, in a sense sacrifice yourself for this great land.. I feal fortunate everyday that I am walking where my forefathers walked and where my kin live, I see the faces of my mother, father, uncles, aunts on the faces of everyone here.. I like you and the Great Rudolf Heß were Germans born onto foreign soil. Ofcoarse neither of us is as great a man as him, but we share a similar affliction. machs gut Bruder..

Dead Eye
Thursday, December 8th, 2011, 04:01 AM
A small amount of non Germanic DNA doesn't really amount for much and there are such things as ineffective genes so if you have a Germanic build,then you are Germanic and the Slavic DNA is really pointless.

Gardisten
Thursday, December 8th, 2011, 05:08 AM
You may want to try and establish whether or not this was the case once and for all. I find that many German-Americans claim to have had an immigrant ancestor who was an officer in the German military, but more often than not this is likely untrue.

Tracing an officer's service is relatively easy since there are still a number of sources available in print, the most significant being the Rangliste. Prussian army records, however, were almost completely destroyed in 1945.

The Rangliste have been digitized by the University of Michigan. People in the USA can view all of them up to 1914, while the rest of use can only view up to 1869. They only go by surname--with a few exceptions--so if the person you are looking for has a common surname, then find the person you're interested in will be somewhat difficult (but not entirely impossible).

http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/000495263


Yes, of course I know that, my great great grandfather served as an officer in the Prussian Armed Forces before moving to the United States before the outbreak of WW1, about 10 years before I think.

Sigurd
Thursday, December 8th, 2011, 08:13 AM
You may want to try and establish whether or not this was the case once and for all. I find that many German-Americans claim to have had an immigrant ancestor who was an officer in the German military, but more often than not this is likely untrue.

How do you find this so likely to be untrue. Many Germans immigrated into the US following the "Year without Summer" when the climate was especially cold 1816-1819 following the volcanic winter after the Mt. Tambora eruption (1815), giving ill harvest especially for 1816.

Seeing how this was but years after Napoleon wreaked havoc across Europe, with Prussians withstanding it, I don't see how this is so unlikely, especially considering that Prussians would have been fairly quick to starve considering their natural resources are not so rich, their success in making it arable stemming from vigorous labour rather than luck in placement in the world. ;)

Aeternitas
Thursday, December 8th, 2011, 02:17 PM
There are also Germans who have ancestry from present day Czechia, Slovenia, Hungary, Romania, Russia etc. These countries had ethnic German communities, what was also the case for Poland. So it doesn't necessarily mean anything.

I also dunno if this identifying with a relatively minor part of one's ancestry to which one has otherwise no cultural, etc. connections is a predominantly American thing, rarely found the same case in Europe. It's not that there are no mixed Europeans, there are people who have various ancestries in their family but will only identify with their predominant one and with its culture and heritage that they have been taught. I haven't heard people saying I'm 1/8 this or 1/16 that. Maybe that's what has lead Americans to think that Europeans are a lot "purer".

Anyways, I agree entirely about serving in the "German" army. I can't grasp the point behind making an extra effort in order to serve in it voluntarily. You will not help Germany or the German people but the Federal Republic. And if you go at war you support the interests of Israel, a foreign nation, and tactics which the FRG typically blames the former NS govt for, like invading foreign territories and violating the freedom and human rights of other people.

Gardisten
Thursday, December 8th, 2011, 08:39 PM
Not sure where you're coming from with this. He stated that his gggrandfather emigrated about a decade prior to the First World War, so c. 1904/5. In general it seems that German officers were less likely to emigrate, there being particular social factors which made severing ties with one's regiment and comrades--not to mention networks established in university, work, and society--that would have made this a difficult choice. Perhaps if the officer had been disgraced for one reason or another. Anyway, it seems to me that many of these family tales about so-and-so having been a Prussian officer come about as a result of the natural evolution of information when passed down through the generations--especially when it's done by women who have little interest or understanding about things military. This I can attest to myself in terms of the sketchy information provided to me about my own father's service, which I have now been able to have officially clarified.


How do you find this so likely to be untrue. Many Germans immigrated into the US following the "Year without Summer" when the climate was especially cold 1816-1819 following the volcanic winter after the Mt. Tambora eruption (1815), giving ill harvest especially for 1816.

Seeing how this was but years after Napoleon wreaked havoc across Europe, with Prussians withstanding it, I don't see how this is so unlikely, especially considering that Prussians would have been fairly quick to starve considering their natural resources are not so rich, their success in making it arable stemming from vigorous labour rather than luck in placement in the world. ;)

Fredericus Rex
Friday, December 9th, 2011, 04:28 AM
Well I have some pretty bad news, my great-great-grandfather who came to America from Germany, came from what is the modern day Polish zone, making me Slavic, although he served as an officer in the German military. Does that mean I am now no longer allowed to remain a member of Skadi, and are my beliefs/efforts in Germanic Preservationism for naught? I can't get rid of these darn genetics, so am I really being fair in my desire to move to Germany and such? Would it be wrong to marry a pure German woman?

Are you still here Herr Wittmann? You are what 1/16 (if its your great great grandpa) Polish and he was a man who served the German Empire. He and you are about as German as is feasibly possible for someone in America or in one of the Polish areas of the old German Empire. Even the Nazis thought the Polish (at least those with "Aryan" features) were assimilable so don't be to hard on yourself.

RoyBatty
Friday, December 9th, 2011, 10:37 PM
I can't grasp the point behind making an extra effort in order to serve in it voluntarily. You will not help Germany or the German people but the Federal Republic. And if you go at war you support the interests of Israel, a foreign nation, and tactics which the FRG typically blames the former NS govt for, like invading foreign territories and violating the freedom and human rights of other people.

All true but at some point the FR and the FR Army need to be reclaimed.

You don't change systems from the outside (as a non-member). You change it from the INSIDE.

Whilst there are many negatives associated with service in the Legions of ZOG it should be remembered that things need not stay as they currently are, for ever and ever.

When the time comes we need the right people in the right places. That includes the FR Army. The preparation for that time starts right now, today.

Wittmann
Tuesday, December 13th, 2011, 07:05 AM
Are you still here Herr Wittmann? You are what 1/16 (if its your great great grandpa) Polish and he was a man who served the German Empire. He and you are about as German as is feasibly possible for someone in America or in one of the Polish areas of the old German Empire. Even the Nazis thought the Polish (at least those with "Aryan" features) were assimilable so don't be to hard on yourself.

Yes! Thank you for the kind words. I have learned to accept that part of me more now, and while I may not consider it my most honorable attribute, I respect him as my family. My family has had generally Aryan traits throughout it's lineage.



Not sure where you're coming from with this. He stated that his gggrandfather emigrated about a decade prior to the First World War, so c. 1904/5. In general it seems that German officers were less likely to emigrate, there being particular social factors which made severing ties with one's regiment and comrades--not to mention networks established in university, work, and society--that would have made this a difficult choice. Perhaps if the officer had been disgraced for one reason or another. Anyway, it seems to me that many of these family tales about so-and-so having been a Prussian officer come about as a result of the natural evolution of information when passed down through the generations--especially when it's done by women who have little interest or understanding about things military. This I can attest to myself in terms of the sketchy information provided to me about my own father's service, which I have now been able to have officially clarified.

Although I do not post personally identifiable details online, I have a photo of him in uniform. Our records are quite sound as to that line, along with my mother's father's line, which we can date back to the 1400's directly, and the furthest back I have ever seen our name is in a Knight's Templar registry, of course I cannot prove if that is direct lineage, or even of the same family, although the name was the same.

Gretel die Katze
Tuesday, December 13th, 2011, 07:32 AM
There are also Germans who have ancestry from present day Czechia, Slovenia, Hungary, Romania, Russia etc. These countries had ethnic German communities, what was also the case for Poland. So it doesn't necessarily mean anything.

I also dunno if this identifying with a relatively minor part of one's ancestry to which one has otherwise no cultural, etc. connections is a predominantly American thing, rarely found the same case in Europe. It's not that there are no mixed Europeans, there are people who have various ancestries in their family but will only identify with their predominant one and with its culture and heritage that they have been taught. I haven't heard people saying I'm 1/8 this or 1/16 that. Maybe that's what has lead Americans to think that Europeans are a lot "purer".



I wonder if this is because Americans feel a need to trace their historic roots since Americans have been so "mixed" and displaced by immigration, that it becomes a sense of psychological relief perhaps to know one's history, where as a person in Europe already knows their traditions go back for possibly hundreds of years.

Fredericus Rex
Wednesday, December 14th, 2011, 03:56 AM
Yes! Thank you for the kind words. I have learned to accept that part of me more now, and while I may not consider it my most honorable attribute, I respect him as my family. My family has had generally Aryan traits throughout it's lineage.




Although I do not post personally identifiable details online, I have a photo of him in uniform. Our records are quite sound as to that line, along with my mother's father's line, which we can date back to the 1400's directly, and the furthest back I have ever seen our name is in a Knight's Templar registry, of course I cannot prove if that is direct lineage, or even of the same family, although the name was the same.

What a lucky man you are, being able to trace your ancestors back six centuries. :)

GroeneWolf
Wednesday, December 14th, 2011, 05:24 AM
and the furthest back I have ever seen our name is in a Knight's Templar registry, of course I cannot prove if that is direct lineage, or even of the same family, although the name was the same.

It is highly unlikely to be a direct lineage, since they took monastic vows when joining the order. At best that person would be a brother of one of your ancestors.