PDA

View Full Version : Doc Marten Boots 50 Year Anniversary



Witta
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 12:37 PM
Klaus Märtens was a doctor in the German army during World War II. While on leave in 1945, he injured his ankle while skiing in the Bavarian Alps. He found that his standard-issue army boots were too uncomfortable on his injured foot. While recuperating, he designed improvements to the boots, with soft leather, and air-padded soles. When the war ended and some Germans looted valuables from their own cities, Märtens took leather from a cobbler's shop. With that leather he made himself a pair of boots with air-cushioned soles.

Märtens didn't have much luck selling his shoes until he met up with an old university friend, Dr. Herbert Funck, in Munich in 1947. Funck was intrigued by the new shoe design, and the two went into business that year in Seeshaupt, Germany, using discarded rubber from Luftwaffe airfields. The comfortable and durable soles were a big hit with housewives, with 80% of sales in the first decade going to women over the age of 40.

Sales had grown so much by 1952 that they opened a factory in Munich. In 1959, the company had grown large enough that Märtens and Funck looked at marketing the footwear internationally. Almost immediately, British shoe manufacturer R. Griggs Group Ltd. bought patent rights to manufacture the shoes in the United Kingdom. Griggs anglicized the name, slightly re-shaped the heel to make them fit better, added the trademark yellow stitching, and trademarked the soles as AirWair.

The first Dr. Martens boots in the United Kingdom came out on 1 April, 1960 (hence known as style 1460 and still in production today) with an eight-eyelet, cherry-red, Nappa leather design. Originally Dr. Martens were made by a number of shoe manufacturers in the Northamptonshire area, as long as they passed quality standards. They were popular among workers such as postmen, police officers and factory workers. By the early 1980s, skinheads started wearing Dr. Martens boots. By the late 1980s, Dr. Martens boots were popular among British New Wave musicians. The boots and shoes then became popular among other youth subcultures.

http://altura.speedera.net/ccimg.catalogcity.com/210000/210500/210515/Products/4981258.jpg

OneWolf
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 12:57 PM
God,I love Doc Martens.I got my first pair when I was 15 during the "Grunge"
movement in the 1990's and have never bought another brand of boots.Doc Martens is almost synonymous with the word comfort and Dr.Martens Air Wair
bouncing rubber outsole puts a spring in your step that almost makes you feel
like your walking on air.

To make a long story short I never blink an eye when I fork over a $150.00 U.S.
Dollars for a pair of Docs.I know that I am paying for quality and comfort not found in any other boot or shoe for that matter.Happy 50th Docs!:thumbup

Witta
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 01:12 PM
I have had a number of pairs in various stages of my life.

In the early eighties as an 8 year old me and my friends all wore crew cuts, monkey boots (Couldn't afford Docco's), Fred perry shirts and Harrington jackets.

At age 12 on a hiking trip with school we were told to buy walking boots, but I instead got some Doc Martens.

I wore them regularly as an new wave/grunge fan in the early nineties.

SaxonPagan
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 01:35 PM
Must get some for my hiking in the forests around here because I've already written off 2 pairs of trainers since the beginning of summer :(

I'll remember to put white laces in them though!

SaxonPagan
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 01:45 PM
A good article. The only line I'd take issue with is ...


By the early 1980s, skinheads started wearing Dr. Martens boots.

... because I know for a fact that they were very popular with Skins in the mid-70s where I lived - possibly even earlier!

flâneur
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 02:13 PM
A good article. The only line I'd take issue with is ...



... because I know for a fact that they were very popular with Skins in the mid-70s where I lived - possibly even earlier!

Heres a pic of someone wearing them in the 60's...can you guess who it is....?

Heres a tip.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTd1SSYYyss&feature=fvst

Witta
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 02:57 PM
My post is the last one I can see on this thread. I've got an ignore list, and I use it. So don't waste your time following me around the forum to pester me Godwinson and TommyAtkins.

SaxonPagan
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 03:21 PM
My post is the last one I can see on this thread. I've got an ignore list, and I use it. So don't waste your time following me around the forum to pester me Godwinson and TommyAtkins.

What :confused I would defy anyone to show that my two posts above constitute “pestering” in any way.

This is surely one of the most bizarre comments I’ve ever seen written on Skadi!

Wulfram
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 03:30 PM
The quality of Doc Martens are nowhere near what they used to be. I wore them throughout my teens, but somewhere in the mid-90s they turned to crap. Could it be because almost all production is now located in china and thailand, where western standards of quality are incomprehensible to the people who make them?
The "leather" is now akin to plastic, and the soles wear out very quickly. They are also not weather-proofed, which means that if they get wet they are prone to mildew or rot.

Grunge ruined them in my opinion. When they became popular on a massive scale the company went the way of everybody else by churning out millions more while sacrificing the original workmanship. I haven't had a pair since then.

SaxonPagan
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 03:39 PM
Thanks for the info, Ronan!

I'm seriously thinking of getting some but haven't had any since the late 1980's so that's very useful to know.

OneWolf
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 04:02 PM
Could it be because almost all production is now located in china and thailand, where western standards of quality are incomprehensible to the people who make them?

Who's to blame for the company moving most of it's production overseas?
Maybe if some of the western business owners cared more about quality and
not profits,the products we hold dear wouldnot be ruined by overseas mass dollar
production techniques.


The "leather" is now akin to plastic, and the soles wear out very quickly. They are also not weather-proofed, which means that if they get wet they are prone to mildew or rot.

Doc Martens guarantee covers the failure of any component which has been subjected to normal wear and tear (such as upper leather, stitched seams, eyelets, soles, welt, linings and reinforcements) and not unreasonably abused.
Also,some Doc Martens are made to be waterproof and if they are not you can
buy a product to rub on your leather uppers to make it waterproof.


Grunge ruined them in my opinion. When they became popular on a massive scale the company went the way of everybody else by churning out millions more while sacrificing the original workmanship. I haven't had a pair since then.

I don't see how the "Grunge" movement ruined Doc Martens.What ruined Doc
Martens was business men who decided to exploit the cheap labor of the over
seas market.I don't see how a "movement" that was fictional and created by
the media can be blamed for ruining anything.You can only blame the business
tactics of a few individuals for that mishap.

Witta
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 04:31 PM
I didn't know Doc Marten boots were invented in Germany, everybody thinks they are British. This will really p**s off the punks. Remind them the first doccos were made by a nazi doctor out of luftwaffe rubber.

Wulfram
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 04:40 PM
Also,some Doc Martens are made to be waterproof and if they are not you can buy a product to rub on your leather uppers to make it waterproof.

I was speaking of the classic Doc Marten, mass produced during the grunge era:

http://i539.photobucket.com/albums/ff355/williamofwaco/2283781093_0aefeb715e.jpg


I don't see how the "Grunge" movement ruined Doc Martens.What ruined Doc Martens was business men who decided to exploit the cheap labor of the over seas market.I don't see how a "movement" that was fictional and created by the media can be blamed for ruining anything.You can only blame the business tactics of a few individuals for that mishap.

Grunge was a post-heavy metal, emo prototype, which was intended to recreate that other corporate cash cow, the 1960s. So many young kids during the 1980s thought the 60s were SO cool and wished they had lived during that time. Well, grunge allowed them to revive this "feeling", even to the point of having another Woodstock.
When the businessmen saw how much sales of Doc Martens increased they exploited its potential and made the shoes part of the standard uniform of grunge, right alongside off-the-rack flannels and wallet chains.
Grunge = business, both one and the same.
Some of the music was good, but most of it was really nothing more than the equivalent of listening to the music they play at the Gap to psyche you into a buying mood. Grunge music was the theme music for grunge fashion, which is what grunge was really about. Its purpose was to make young people think that a real movement was afoot, that "our" time had arrived, and that great things could only result. The only thing that truly resulted from this time were a few people who earned untold millions while numerous disillusioned kids became hopeless addicts or moved onto the next craze. Most grungekins I knew or saw were nothing but stoners and slackers, and if that is the legacy of the 1960s then I condemn it just as equally.

The Melvins were my favorite band to come out the grunge era, although many people felt they did not belong because they weren't from Seattle.

wAl3A2pYFhM

wittwer
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 06:57 PM
I always found them too be a little "clunky" and that bright yellow stitching in the welts, well what can I say and the high top versions are a little over the top.

Personally, I prefer Red Wings or Chippewas, in the 6" to 8" tops with a Goodyear "Panama" welt/sole and steel shank. They've taken me from the streets of Chicago and New York, to the livestock pens of Illinois and Ohio, to the Petrochemical Complexes of N.A., to the top of the Rockies, Appalachians and the Alleghenies. Tough boots, wear well and are repairable... ;)

Fyrgenholt
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 07:04 PM
I always found them too be a little "clunky"

Yeah, me too. I didn't find them very comfortable, either. Suffice to say I've only owned one pair, as I swiftly found I didn't like them.