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View Full Version : Adopting from Breeders vs. Rescue Centers



Sissi
Thursday, September 30th, 2010, 12:11 PM
From where do you prefer to adopt pets?

From breeders - you get certified purity, better health conditions.

From rescue centers - you might not get any of the above, but you save an animal life.

Hersir
Thursday, September 30th, 2010, 02:40 PM
I adopted my 10 year old from a private person, if we didnt take him the dog would be put to sleep. Havnt regretted taking the dog, we are best of friends.

Mrs vonTrep
Thursday, September 30th, 2010, 03:05 PM
I adopted my 10 year old from a private person, if we didnt take him the dog would be put to sleep. Havnt regretted taking the dog, we are best of friends.

I did the same with my dogs. The little pitbull mix nobody wanted because of his crazy behavior and extreme energy, and the older German shepherd mix nobody wanted because of how aggressive he was towards both dogs and humans.

I took them in and let them live, today they are the best dogs ever. :thumbup

I have only had these kind of dogs, and I can't see myself buying a dog from a breeder when I know how many dogs out there are living bad lives and are in desperate need of a new owner.

Wulfram
Thursday, September 30th, 2010, 03:08 PM
The man I bought my Pit Bull from rescued her from another man that wanted to use her to "train" his fighting dogs.
In other words, she would have been thrown into a cage and torn to pieces.
I did not hesitate for a second.
My German Shepherd is also a rescue.

Grimsteinr
Thursday, September 30th, 2010, 07:39 PM
Over the last, nearly 15 years that we have had Dobermans, we first went to a regular Breeder. We got two males from the same litter, a black one and a red one. They were cropped & docked, ears cropped & tail docked.
They were both wonderful pets, companions & watch dogs. They both passed on a few years ago.

When the 1st one died, we heard about a Doberman Rescue, a few hours away.Their dogs are generally "Registered". They have several to choose from, of various ages, sexes, colors & styles, and all Dobermans. The younger dogs cost more. But at that much cheaper than a Breeder. They do have maintanence expenses.
We drove down there, 2 1/2 hours, and brought back a youngish female,
2 1/2 years old, docked but not cropped. We had full AKC papers on her, just like we did on the 2 males we got from the Breeder. She was with us for
4 years and developed a heart condition. She passed in her sleep. One morning I woke and she was gone........It was a sad occasion.

In a few months, we went back to the Doberman Rescue. This time we got an 8 month old Female, also with full AKC papers. She is a sweetheart and very smart. But she is an Alpha-female.She requires a master/mistress with a firm will. 2 years after we go her, our older red Male, developed heart problems. He lived a bit but eventually had to be put down because of his pain. He did have a good full life, though.

The latest time we went to the Doberman Rescue, we brought home a 4 year old black Male. He's Cropped & docked & he's a beauty. He is well trained, a great companion, & friend. We have his AKC papers, as well.

We have had very good luck with the Doberman Rescue we go to. They have checked us out to verify our rural location, our fenced area and how well we treat our dogs. Our Vet always loves our dogs, how well they are behaved and easily handled.
I tink it all depends on the Breeder you go to, or the Rescue agency you find. Some are better than others.

Nixe
Thursday, September 30th, 2010, 08:44 PM
Buying from a breeder doesn't necessarily mean better health conditions. The first dog I ever had as a child was a Cocker Spaniel from a breeder who inbred the mother with her puppies and brothers with sisters. It was a mess. The dog was "100% purebred," but had the worst Cocker Spaniel traits you could find. We could not get that dog to stop submissive/excitement peeing no matter what we did. I think we finally wound up giving it to one of my mom's coworkers, who planned on keeping her on her farm.

I know not all breeders are like this, but it just goes to show that just because a dog has "papers," doesn't mean you'll be getting a great dog. Personally, if I were to get another dog, I'd probably visit the local human society. Those are the animals that are in the most dire need of a home.

Schaferhund
Thursday, September 30th, 2010, 10:31 PM
From both breeders and shelters.

Thorwolf
Thursday, September 30th, 2010, 10:40 PM
While I myself am a dog breeder, I have from time to time adopted dogs.

If you are going to buy from a breeder, insist on a clean bill of health!

Also, If you are a first time dog owner, and even if you aren't you should do your home work. not every breed of dog is the same, like my breed the registered american pit bull terrier, these dogs require special knowledge to own, in my oppinion to many uneducated people want one of my dogs. I try my best to educate people about them, and I have from time to time refused to sell one of my dogs to some unscrupulous individuals. Because of this I do not produce very many dogs for sale. Instead I choose only to breed when I can improve the breed in some way.

either way, breeder, or rescue, the important thing is to love the animal, care for the animal as if it were part of your family!

oh, and if you are going to buy from a breeder, do your best to make sure that it is an ethical one. If not, report them!

Sigurd
Friday, October 1st, 2010, 12:09 PM
Our dog (I can hardly speak for it being "my" dog alone, it's technically "my mother's dog" and I don't live with my mother --- but for me, it's also my dog) is a pure-bred Bernese Mountain Dog. We've had him since he was a puppy, and we got him from the breeder, and we've all been happy ever since we have him (six years now). :thumbup

Here it was actually a bit of both worlds. He was from the onset the tallest of the four, but you know how the regulation about the pattern are, and his paws show a little "too much" white (above the ankles instead of just mid-paw), and so all the other three were quickly picked and no one wanted the "mis-drawn" one, but all of our family immediately knew it could be no other; an immediate feeling you can't relate to if you haven't been there yourself. :)

Amazing dog he is, typically calm (except in thunderstorms, go figure :oanieyes) - your typical "fluffy dog who wouldn't harm a fly" here, but very protective there; and when compared to the other dogs in the vicinity he's the undoubted "Alpha" dog: they all respect him despite his calm and well-meaning demeanor. He's a little too cuddly at times, but Hel, can't have everything. :P

I could see myself taking in a dog from a rescue center, and could see myself make a good and followsome dog even out of an aggressive dog, what counts for humans counts for pets doubly: Friendly and affectionate at most times, but harsh and authoritative when push comes to shove, yet always fair.

But the question for the breeder vs. rescue center is quite more than just choice or pity: The other issue to take into account is that of whether you have children or not - whilst you're unmarried and/or without children, you can take in any fresh dog that may yet have to be shown how to behave --- when you have children you should ideally make a point of buying from the breeder: It is here that you'll be able to verify the behaviour and health of his ancestral line, and that is paramount when it comes to having children and dogs. :)

Ediruc
Saturday, October 2nd, 2010, 07:28 AM
I got my beagle from a breeder. My beagle is top of the line breed (15 inches and 30+ pounds). He has a lot of muscle and is one of the fastest dogs I've ever seen.

Rogue
Friday, October 15th, 2010, 12:17 AM
I worked for 7 years with the Delaware Valley Golden Retriever Rescue.
I have seen way too much to do anything other then rescue dogs from shelters and such.
I live in the "puppy Mill" center of America. Lancaster Pa. is known nation wide for this dubious distinction.
The Amish and Mennonites found that dogs pay off better then tobacco.
I have seen what some breeders do for money and I can't support that.
Please forgive me, those you that breed with respect for the animals. But the horrors I have seen has jaded me.


Rogue

Ardito
Sunday, November 28th, 2010, 12:48 AM
I got my dog from a shelter, myself. She was an unwanted puppy, a mutt. I dislike it when people insist on purity of breed; it always comes across as the person treating their dog as a possession, a toy, something to show off, which I find deeply unpleasant. It'd make perfect sense if you needed a specific breed with specific abilities for a purpose, like, say, hunting, but that's almost never the case; it's always just to show off these days.

SpearBrave
Sunday, November 28th, 2010, 01:50 AM
I think getting a dog from a breeder or a rescue is fine for most cases if you want just a companion.

However if you want dogs for specific needs or purpose then a breeder in the way to go. I breed dogs and am constanly trying to improve my breed for the purpose they are bred for( bird hunting ). Hunting and working instincts are passed down through genetics and good breeders pay close attention to these traits in the sporting dog world.

While I don't breed dogs for profit I do it soley for pleasure. I enjoy spending time with my dogs and I like to think they enjoy spending time with me.

There is also the case of dogs adopting people, meaning a stray that shows up at your door and you can't help but let them live with you and share your lives together. There is one such dog like that around here we call him Sid.
We don't own him he just lives with us.;)

Here is Sid
http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac267/sidthekid999/springgarden2010005.jpg

Sciuirse Morrigna
Monday, November 29th, 2010, 03:33 PM
I usually look at dogs being given away. Usually it's an unwanted breeding, and if they can't get rid of the puppies, they'll have them killed.

I look for whichever is the most active and aggressive.

Although I've taken the runt before as well. Althought that "runt" turned out to be a nearly 200 pound Newfoundland mixed with something else.

I like big, aggressive dogs, but I also have a hard time looking at the rejected runt, knowing its fate, so I'll take them and nurture them as much as possible. Often they end up being the best dogs.

I also prefer mutts to purebreds. They're usually smarter and healthier than purebreds. I've never had one I couldn't get to hunt and be great dogs.

BritishLad
Saturday, January 1st, 2011, 10:10 PM
Before Ruby our 3 cats had come from friends but we got Ruby from the RSPCA - she was called "Petal" and was thin (she's the opposite of that now though :D).

theTasmanian
Sunday, January 2nd, 2011, 01:24 AM
Hmm here we have Breeders(back yard and puppy farms) and "Proper" breeders(registered pure breed types)

Having had a "back yard" dog (one of the current dogs) she does the "Job" we wanted her for and still does how ever next time it will be from a Proper breeder and it will be pure Mastiff not a x-breed mastiff
the other Mastiff we had that died of cancer was given to us by a breeder :~(

the other current dog is from the local pound(dogs home rescue etc etc) and she is a keen little hunter........the job i had intended her for

again how ever when she dies she will be replaced with an English pointer....so back to the proper breeders

lastly was my first Dog Butch the Weimaraner i got him from his first owner who didnt have time to train him:thumbdown
But he was from a registered breeder and with a good year of training he was great......he even retrieved from very cold water that most Wei's down here don't like too

Depending on the type of Dog and the intended job I would rather get one from a registed breeder how ever with Mastiff type dogs i prefer them to be all sorts of crosses of pure mastiffs eg English mastiff X dog de bordeaux
or similar as many are getting prone to cancer (that's what took my last mastiff) and by cross breeding it seems to be less likely

We don't tend to by them for their looks However i will not get another pointer (other than the English pointer) due to the Ban on tail docking here
i know the Best Weimaraner breeders have gone because of this ban so its really a big loss to the breeds concerned

Sturmbaon
Sunday, January 2nd, 2011, 02:57 AM
They just find us. All pets we had yet, just felt themselves in security at our place, and then stayed. So I can say that we were chosen by them.

nauthiz
Friday, February 25th, 2011, 12:32 AM
I rescue.

OneEye
Sunday, February 27th, 2011, 03:47 AM
I purchase my dogs from breeders. I like pure breed dogs; better quality, more intelligent and all around fantastic dog. It is like what we want to do, keep ourselves pure and not mixed.

OneEye
Sunday, February 27th, 2011, 03:49 AM
I think getting a dog from a breeder or a rescue is fine for most cases if you want just a companion.

However if you want dogs for specific needs or purpose then a breeder in the way to go. I breed dogs and am constanly trying to improve my breed for the purpose they are bred for( bird hunting ). Hunting and working instincts are passed down through genetics and good breeders pay close attention to these traits in the sporting dog world.

While I don't breed dogs for profit I do it soley for pleasure. I enjoy spending time with my dogs and I like to think they enjoy spending time with me.

There is also the case of dogs adopting people, meaning a stray that shows up at your door and you can't help but let them live with you and share your lives together. There is one such dog like that around here we call him Sid.
We don't own him he just lives with us.;)

Here is Sid
http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac267/sidthekid999/springgarden2010005.jpg

Sid looks like a happy, loveable old man. :thumbup

PinkGirl
Sunday, July 17th, 2011, 09:20 AM
There are so many unwanted animals that need homes! With that being said I would rather adopt an animal from a rescue! :)

BlessedGoddess
Wednesday, September 21st, 2011, 07:39 AM
I have a mutt and he's perfect in every way.
Rescue is the way to go!:thumbup
There are rescues that are set up for some breeds also.

Frostbite
Wednesday, September 21st, 2011, 10:06 AM
Our dog is from a breeder, next time I get a pet of any kind, I'll go to the pound or something.

Unless you need a dog for a special purpose, there's almost no real reason to go to a breeder. Especially with so many dogs in shelters.

AutymnMoone
Sunday, December 25th, 2011, 01:07 AM
Unless you need a dog for a special purpose, there's almost no real reason to go to a breeder. Especially with so many dogs in shelters.

I agree! We just put our 12 year old Pit Bull to sleep a month ago, the hardest thing we've ever had to do - but at the same time we were able to rescue another Pit that same night. His previous owner was desperate to find him a new home, as she had lost hers, otherwise she was going to have to take him to the shelter the next day, and anyone living near Detroit knows what happens to Pits at the shelters. He is the happiest go lucky dog...and at a year old, he'll be with us for a long time.

I fully support adopting dogs/cats. There are so so many out there that are in need of forever homes. You may not know their breeding or background all the time, but for a loyal animal that wants to please and love...you've saved a precious life.

Vulcade
Thursday, June 7th, 2012, 04:41 AM
If you need a dog that'll fulfil a certain purpose then getting one from a reputable breeder could be best. You can find good dogs at shelters but from my experience most are problematic.

Responsible ownership is most important.

SwordOfTheVistula
Thursday, June 7th, 2012, 06:35 AM
Mine have all been stray cats I've found

Mrs vonTrep
Thursday, June 7th, 2012, 09:42 AM
The dog I rescued from being put down when he was 4 years old - he turned 13 yesterday. The best dog I've ever known. :heartbeat

Bärin
Tuesday, March 28th, 2017, 10:58 PM
Our first dog we got him from a private person who couldn't keep it anymore. He was our big baby, but he past away. :( Our second dog which was its play partner for a while my sister found in a box near a thrash (!) It was a litter or pupies and she took them to a vet and they were all dead except this small pup. :( After it was nursed to health my sister couldn't keep it because she rents and the landlord doesn't want animals. So we took it and gave it a new home. It was much younger than our great Dane and when it died it was alone and sad. We mourned our dog and didn't want to replace him at first, but we also wanted to help another dog since we had the space and the possibility to give it a home. And we wanted a play partner for our other dog and another pet for our kids. So we went to the pound and requested the most miserable dog and they gave us an old dog nobody wanted and we took it home. The dog wasn't interested at first but now it's spolied and happy. So I say shelters, rescue centers and pounds come first, there are too many animals in need for a home.

Mrs vonTrep
Tuesday, March 28th, 2017, 11:15 PM
The dog I rescued from being put down when he was 4 years old - he turned 13 yesterday. The best dog I've ever known. :heartbeat

He passed away about a month after I wrote that post. He is still the best dog I have ever known.

One of my husband's rescue dogs, a Dogue de Bordeaux, passed away only two weeks ago. She was very, very sweet and loyal. We are now looking for a new DDB girl and we're not sure whether to go for a puppy from a breeder or a rescue dog. This breed isn't very common and is hard to find at the rescues, especially since you want a certain personality and disposition that fits in with your family and other pets.

If it was up to me I think I would go with a breeder and get a puppy, but it's generally much more work with a puppy than getting an adult dog. Obviously depending on the specific dog, a rescue can be pretty damaged and might need as much work as a puppy. It's a tough choice.