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Roderic
Saturday, September 25th, 2010, 04:32 PM
http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2010/TECH/web/09/21/google.transparency/t1larg.jpg

(CNN) -- Think internet censorship only happens in China and Iran? Think again, says Google.

The search company this week released a new online tool to highlight specific instances of government censorship of the internet in countries from Germany to Turkey and Australia to Thailand.

Called Google Transparency, the online report shows (http://forums.skadi.net/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.goog le.com%2Ftransparencyreport%2F) that internet censorship around the world is increasing over time, and not always in the countries you'd expect, said Dorothy Chou, a Google policy analyst who worked on the project.

"The threat to internet freedom has actually been growing over the past few years," she said, noting that the United States generally bucks that trend by supporting open online communication (http://forums.skadi.net/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cnn. com%2F2010%2FTECH%2F01%2F21%2Fclinton.in ternet%2Findex.html%3Firef%3Dallsearch).

Google Transparency includes an interactive map where users can see how many requests countries have made for Google to block or remove content.


Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/web/09/21/google.transparency/index.html?hpt=T2 (http://forums.skadi.net/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cnn. com%2F2010%2FTECH%2Fweb%2F09%2F21%2Fgoog le.transparency%2Findex.html%3Fhpt%3DT2)

Ragnar Lodbrok
Wednesday, September 29th, 2010, 12:37 AM
I support internet censorship 100%, it just means less useless crap to search through and the already illegal stuff(you know what mean...:() left on there is wiped out of there clean.

GroeneWolf
Wednesday, September 29th, 2010, 04:41 AM
I support internet censorship 100%, it just means less useless crap to search through and the already illegal stuff(you know what mean...:() left on there is wiped out of there clean.

Government censorship is seldom about what most people would agree that should be removed. And is more about blocking things that does not fit well with the political agenda of the ruling body.

Saxnot
Wednesday, September 29th, 2010, 05:09 AM
I support internet censorship 100%, it just means less useless crap to search through and the already illegal stuff(you know what mean...:() left on there is wiped out of there clean.

You mean like Skadi? You really have no idea what internet censorship is all about, do you.

EQ Fighter
Wednesday, September 29th, 2010, 05:17 AM
I support internet censorship 100%, it just means less useless crap to search through and the already illegal stuff(you know what mean...:() left on there is wiped out of there clean.

Guess you will not be coming to THIS SITE, anymore, because it is already rated as a "Hate Site."

And Chances are if you are coming here, you may already be on a watch list somewhere.

Aeternitas
Wednesday, September 29th, 2010, 03:32 PM
There are some instances in which I think Internet censorship would make sense, for example an employer blocking sites because he doesn't want his employees posting, chatting or playing games on the job, or parents suppressing inappropriate content for their children. In other words, privately implemented censorship. There is IMO no need for every citizen to have the government decide for them what they can and cannot read/view. The advocates of suppressing freedom of expression on the Internet have become successful by using sensitive topics as pretexts, e.g. terrorism. In the meantime all sort of "offensive" content, such as politically incorrect and "racist" opinions get thrown under the same category. All the while we read in constitutions that every citizen has the right to freedom of expression, association, etc. If only the popular and morally accepted opinions are allowed to be voiced, then there is little left to protect, for one is taking no risk by expressing a politically correct thought.

Anyway I don't think censorship keeps the world that safe, especially on the Internet, where there are so many ways to go around it. I'm thinking for example about a recent case of Internet censorship in Austria, where a minaret game was removed for being offensive towards Muslims. Not only was it brought back online shortly after, but its censorship brought it much more attention than it would have received in the first place.

Ragnar Lodbrok
Wednesday, September 29th, 2010, 07:46 PM
Guess you will not be coming to THIS SITE, anymore, because it is already rated as a "Hate Site."

And Chances are if you are coming here, you may already be on a watch list somewhere.

wait a sec, I shouldn't have worded what said the way I did...

I was trying to draw a line...between stricter guidelines and filters for getting rid of spam, ricin making guides and erotica which would still allow free speech concerning informational, educational and news sources. I was actually being sarcastic with the "100%" comment, censoring things based standards of morality and internet providers is destructive, creates misinformation about numerous things and should be repelled at all costs.

Catterick
Saturday, February 11th, 2017, 01:28 PM
No one is consistently anti-censirship. I used to be extremely anti-censorship but the double standards and insincerity pissed me off. Not to mention these people favour idealism over pragmatism.

Today's censors were whining about McCarthyism decades ago and moderate right wingers took their side: moderates gave them the noose they now hang from.

Like it or not censorship, surveillance and political violence are mandated by reality. The problem is modern cultural malaise: traditional cultures (even by a loose definition) had notions determining proper limits such as privacy and even implicit rights to revolution. With those under siege or gone there is nothing convincing to appeal to.

Think about it: most of our actions are under surveillance even if only by human eyes and memories. The issue then is data rights not "privacy".

As for the spread of surveillance tech even into our homes and bedrooms - people like Google Inc have caused that. Hypocrisy much.

Besides Google (owners of YT) dragged their feet when asked to remove footage of an autistic kid being bullied. When their execs were punished in Italy with a suspended sentence, Google had a fit in the name of "free speech". And yet they respond pretty quick to corporate takedown notices.

I do not believe free speech is unconditionally desirable or ethical. And moral relativism cannot coexist with such moral universalism.

Žoreišar
Saturday, March 18th, 2017, 02:31 AM
I don't think the main problem of today's culture of censorship is institutional in nature. The main problem, is self-censorship. If there is a feeling of lacking security in terms of speaking your mind among friends, family, colleagues and random strangers, for fear of social ramifications, it provides a far stronger clutch over the public discourse than merely banning a book, film or speech from the public sphere. Besides, the latter has proven its practical short-comings time and time again, while the former seems to be working quite well, for the time being.

For the vast majority of people, being considered an outcast or "deplorable", is one of their worst fears. Probably having roots in our ancient history, when being rejected by one's tribe, would constitute a near-certain death. As long as the establishment are able the dictate the criteria for what defines a thought-criminal outcast, they can let the masses take care of their own imprisonment.

Žoreišar
Saturday, March 18th, 2017, 10:48 AM
There is a theory floating around, that the leaking of the documents attributed to supposed dissident, Edward Snowden, were in fact orchestrated by the US government itself, as an experiment to see how the public would react to the notion of being mass-surveilled, and how this would influence their conduct and exercise of free speech. For a scrawny geek, who worked all his life behind the safety of a desk, he seems remarkably chill about having the most powerful and influential government in the World out for his neck. It's also peculiar how easily he managed to escape from Hong Kong, as the US authorities put an international warrant on him one day too late for it to be effective when boarding his flight to Russia.

Fire Sprite
Saturday, March 18th, 2017, 12:27 PM
Funny guy does the commentary
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