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Bernhard
Thursday, May 13th, 2010, 04:13 PM
Many Philosophers have been searching for universal standards for good behaviour since ages. Socrates searched for the essence of piety in the Eutyphro and was convinced that this essence exists somehow. He did not agree with the ethical relativism of some of his Sophist contemperaries. Protagoras for example says the following in the Theaetetus: "For I hold that whatever practices seem right and laudable to any particular State are so for that State, so long as it holds by them."

When we consider culture to be connected to ethnicity (or race) and believe that our culture is best for us, because it belongs to us and is created by our ethnos, does this inevitably lead to ethical relativism? Do all peoples have their own standards which suit them best or are there universal standards despite this ethnoculturalist view?

Thyriusz
Sunday, May 16th, 2010, 03:00 PM
I do not believe in universal standards.
A culture should only venerate her own values - perhaps respect the values of allied cultures but never copy them.
On the other hand we should also never project our values on others - and make them as worthy as ourselves.

When dealing with foreign cultures and their standards, one must always keep in mind that it is foreign and never apply that point of view to oneself.

But I also despise the 'every culture has the right to be' mindset: if we have conflicting interest - than we have to do everything to push them aside and bring our interests into reality.

We have to be the beginning and the end for us, the only thing that should matter (to us) are we.

Agrippa
Sunday, May 16th, 2010, 03:20 PM
I think there is what I call the hierarchy and priority of values, which has always mean to us, that there is something "beyond our ethnic group", if for nothing else, because if humanity ruins itself, our people will go with it so to say.

Also compare to my approach:
http://forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=611131&postcount=33

I think there are rules for the group and such for the other levels.

In the end, regardless of whether you are ethnocentric or not, Ethical Relativism is a fact in all matters, because every ethic is in its own way relative.

I dont know how anybody could dare to state anything being an Universal ethic, at best the rules I mentioned are, because they are based on the biological and sociocultural mechanisms which form our reality in this world.

Still I know one can use other standards or interpretations, but in the end, its all relative and humans should decide for whats most useful in their life as individuals and as a group.

And the group can be defined hierarchically, like described in the linked post.

Bombastus
Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012, 06:38 AM
I dont know how anybody could dare to state anything being an Universal ethic, at best the rules I mentioned are, because they are based on the biological and sociocultural mechanisms which form our reality in this world.

The problem with this, is that the biological and sociocultural mechanisms in question are only lower-order expressions of universal truth. You have to reason from the top down to make sense of these things. This bottom-up thinking is unpleasantly materialistic.