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Hilderinc
Wednesday, February 17th, 2010, 06:26 AM
I understand that after Germany's territorial losses in WWII many Germans were forced to leave the ceded territories and their numbers are all but gone today.

What I want to know is if people who can be labeled as "Prussian" still exist in any large numbers. Any demographics, statistics and the like would be helpful.

Sigurd
Wednesday, February 17th, 2010, 02:56 PM
What I want to know is if people who can be labeled as "Prussian" still exist in any large numbers. Any demographics, statistics and the like would be helpful.

That totally depends on whether you observe it from a "wider perspective" or from a "Bavarian perspective". Down here, we term everyone who isn't Bajuvarian or Alemannic as "Prussians". ;)

Ralf
Thursday, February 18th, 2010, 12:43 AM
Iam half Prussian, if thats any good?
Whats more, only 1/4 East Prussian as the other Grandparent was West Prussian, and from where we had to flee after the First World war, nevermind the second.

The other half of me is English, but England just does and belives what thier Jewish masters tell them, Prussians had the guts to try and shake off thier yoke of oppression, maybe Iam getting ashamed to be part English, so will be all Prussian.

Hilderinc
Thursday, February 18th, 2010, 09:54 PM
I should have been more clear, I meant to ask if there are still Germanic Prussians who exist in Prussia

theTasmanian
Thursday, February 18th, 2010, 11:27 PM
Totally Germanic i doubt it

I have cousins(Grand father was from Posan area Half German his mother was from Königsberg) in what is now Poland that are "part" Germanic

and even before Prussia "fell" you have to remember that a large number of "Prussians" were Baltic/German so after the Fall any who had common sense run for it to area's like schleswig Holstein(my Grand mothers side originate from there 1600's) i think it was the Dohna's (sp) that lead the great march away from the Russians to end up there

Hauke Haien
Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010, 04:30 AM
Up to 150.000 initially remained in the Polish portion of East Prussia, although those were more likely to be Masurians, i.e. Protestant Masovians who had found refuge in the region after the Reformation, but some of the original Germanic colonists were also among them. The Soviets were more thorough in their enclave, but a small number of Germans remained. Since they were usually unregistered, it is difficult to know how many. By that time, the Prussian Lithuanians (who are closest to the Baltic Prussians) still existed as a distinguishable ethnic group, but they were likewise expelled, some of them to Lithuania.

Today, it is still possible to find some Germans from the war generation in the East Prussian region, but their children, if they had any, have long since migrated to the Federal Republic, because they simply had no future as Germans in societies that are now Polish and Russian. German communities do not exist any longer.

This kind of soft expulsion accompanied the post-war era as a continuous process and led to the loss of an additional 4 million Germans in their settlement areas in Central and Eastern Europe, which adds up to a total of 18 million Germans that were lost in a wider region once dominated by the German nation.

Ragnar Lodbrok
Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010, 04:35 AM
We're were starting to slowly lose East Prussia to the Slavs after the war...:thumbdown thats terrible, we've got to start taking the land back, whats the terrain like over there may I ask?

Hauke Haien
Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010, 09:07 AM
Well, not exactly. This slow process is dwarfed by the planned mass expulsions, largely executed by 1950. Here is an early plan drawn up by the United States Department of State for discussion with their Allies:

http://forums.skadi.net/photoplog/images/25744/1_Vertreibungsgebiet.jpg

The area of East Prussia is also marked, in case there is still confusion. It gave the Kingdom of Prussia its name, but there were many other Prussian provinces. Ostpreußen, Westpreußen and Posen were lost completely, Schlesien and Pommern except for small portions, as well as a large part of Brandenburg.


Adjacent to the Prussian territories were those lost by Habsburg after the First World War, which retained their German settlers until the expulsion:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/47/Austria_Hungary_ethnic.svg/775px-Austria_Hungary_ethnic.svg.png

Austria itself had to renounce the German nation in the Austrian State Treaty of 1955 in order to gain its "independence".

Devin De Blois
Friday, March 19th, 2010, 12:58 PM
It's a shame, Germany lost most of what was the original Kingdom of Prussia after WWII. There's a few Germans left in Poland, but not many.

Walter
Saturday, March 20th, 2010, 03:55 PM
We're were starting to slowly lose East Prussia to the Slavs after the war...:thumbdown thats terrible, we've got to start taking the land back, whats the terrain like over there may I ask?

This isn't extensive, by any means, but may give you an idea. I have a few other URLs w/ photos to find on my hard drive.:

http://www.flickr.com/groups/kaliningradskaya/pool

Ralf
Sunday, March 21st, 2010, 01:04 AM
THanks for those pictures Walter, are they all from recent years, how did you get them, did you visit the area yourself?

Do you know where to get pictures of what it was like when it was Prussian?

runder
Sunday, March 21st, 2010, 01:30 AM
That totally depends on whether you observe it from a "wider perspective" or from a "Bavarian perspective". Down here, we term everyone who isn't Bajuvarian or Alemannic as "Prussians". ;)

You bring up an interesting point. You mention Bajuvarians and Alemans as being non-Prussian. Where are those groups? And what exactly are Prussians- I thought that they were technically Saxons that moved Eastward and conquered Slav/Balt land? What is the sub-German tribal breakdown? Are Frisians considered German, Dutch, or just Frisian? Are Swabians Alemans? Are Hessians Saxons? Neidersachsens are Saxons, but the Germans in Sachsen aren't really Saxons- what are they? What are Rhinelanders and Westphalians?

Even though I am fairly knowledgable about German history, this information is difficult to find in English language resources. I'd really appreciate it if a German could explain the tribal divisions. A double thanks if you can recommend reference material on this topic.

Ralf
Sunday, March 21st, 2010, 02:21 AM
You bring up an interesting point. You mention Bajuvarians and Alemans as being non-Prussian. Where are those groups? And what exactly are Prussians- I thought that they were technically Saxons that moved Eastward and conquered Slav/Balt land? What is the sub-German tribal breakdown? Are Frisians considered German, Dutch, or just Frisian? Are Swabians Alemans? Are Hessians Saxons? Neidersachsens are Saxons, but the Germans in Sachsen aren't really Saxons- what are they? What are Rhinelanders and Westphalians?

Even though I am fairly knowledgable about German history, this information is difficult to find in English language resources. I'd really appreciate it if a German could explain the tribal divisions. A double thanks if you can recommend reference material on this topic.

Maybe part of the dual use of the name Prussian comes from the fact that the Elector of Brandenburg of the House of Hohenzollern couldnt be called King of Brandenberg as it was part of the Holy Roman Empire, on marrying into Prussia which wasnt under the durisdiction of Austria, he was able to call himself King in Prussia.
Hie empire of Brandenburg and Prussia was originally called Brandenburg Prussia with the capital being Berlin in Brandenburg, after a while the Brandenburg part of the name was dropped so Prussia, the became the original Prussia plus the state of Brandenburg.
As the House of Hohenzollern increased its influence over other German states most of northern Germany became part of the Kingdom of Prussia, extending right over to France.

So, you have the real Prussians who lived in Prussia which is now Poland, and the majority of other Germans who might also be called Prussians, due to the fact that allthough they lived in differant parts of Germany, they where in the expanded Kingdom of Prussia.

theTasmanian
Sunday, March 21st, 2010, 02:35 AM
Poland & Russia ;)

Wanderer
Sunday, March 21st, 2010, 03:05 AM
A friend of my maternal grandfather had family origins in Stargard, which is east of the Oder River. But, as Hauke Haien, pointed out, any Germanic communities that once existed in what we now call Poland are long gone. Also, my high school German teacher hailed from East Prussia, and you better believe that they hauled a@$ to get out of there b4 the Russians showed up. Here in Milwaukee, there is an annual Germanfest in July, and there are groups there with Prussian roots who have maps and other info available to the public to peruse. If anyone is ever in Milwaukee, the German capital of the US, in July, stop in and visit there. I don't have any blood connections to Prussia, and to me Prussia is east of the Oder, but they suffered greatly at the the hands of the victorious Allies, like other Germans. My great-grandfather was a cavalryman in the German Army of WWI, and he wore the notable helmet with spike on the top, which is classic Prussian (although he hailed from the Duesseldorf region-which was technically part of Prussia pre-World War I).

It all comes back together again, doesn't it? I don't recall the thread, but someone referred to how the Germans would have done just fine, thank you, if the US had not stuck their noses into the European theater during WW2. It would have been tough, but in the end, the Germany would have defeated the USSR. Germany lost Prussia because the US just had to save their Zionist Euro brethren. I say, let 2 sides duke it out man to man. The fact that the US, Britain and France rolled into an undefended Germany from the west says NOTHING about the military skill or heart of the Allied forces. In the end, the Amis had to do what the Germans were only trying to do in the first place: terminate the Soviet threat. The best the we (the Americans) could do was to point nukes at Russia and create a standoff. The Germans actually tried to go in and clean out the stable. Say what you will, but it seesm to me that the best we can do is to fight others who ahve a hand tied behing their back, which makes us (the Americans) not too gallant. On the behalf of my American countrymen, I say to you, Germanics in Europe, Prussians included, 'Ich tut mir leid'-we betrayed you:~(

runder
Sunday, March 21st, 2010, 04:19 AM
Maybe part of the dual use of the name Prussian comes from the fact that the Elector of Brandenburg of the House of Hohenzollern couldnt be called King of Brandenberg as it was part of the Holy Roman Empire, on marrying into Prussia which wasnt under the durisdiction of Austria, he was able to call himself King in Prussia.
Hie empire of Brandenburg and Prussia was originally called Brandenburg Prussia with the capital being Berlin in Brandenburg, after a while the Brandenburg part of the name was dropped so Prussia, the became the original Prussia plus the state of Brandenburg.
As the House of Hohenzollern increased its influence over other German states most of northern Germany became part of the Kingdom of Prussia, extending right over to France.

So, you have the real Prussians who lived in Prussia which is now Poland, and the majority of other Germans who might also be called Prussians, due to the fact that allthough they lived in differant parts of Germany, they where in the expanded Kingdom of Prussia.

Thanks for the response. I know about the history of the state of Prussia (AFAIK, the name "Prussia" came from the Batic tribe that lived in what became German East Prussia at the time of the arrival of the Teutonic Knights); I'm asking about the tribal (for lack of a better word) identification of the people of Prussia (Brandenburgers and east, not the territory in Western Germany that came under Prussian control in 1815) . Did Prussian Germans consider themselves to be members of, say, the Saxon "tribe" living in the Prussian state, or did they consider themselves to be Prussian, a seperate and distinct German "tribe." My question to the Germans is about the underlying "tribal" identities that underly the modern German states rather than asking why Southern Germans call Northern Germans Prussian.

Vlad Cletus
Thursday, March 25th, 2010, 12:39 PM
I understand that after Germany's territorial losses in WWII many Germans were forced to leave the ceded territories and their numbers are all but gone today.

What I want to know is if people who can be labeled as "Prussian" still exist in any large numbers. Any demographics, statistics and the like would be helpful.

This is rather funny. What's "Prussian" to you? What I find to be even more ignorant is that only several people here so far acknowledges that the original Prussians were a Baltic People, NOT Germanic.

I will re-state and re-phrase the statement. You all need to understand that the original and true Prussians were NOT Germanic but BALTIC. In fact, it can be argued that many of these Prussians that you all speak of are just Germanized Balts who lost their cultural identification through colonization before and after the fall of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, many resemble the Baltic and Aistin 'sub-races'. If you can even use such a term.

Hilderinc
Saturday, March 27th, 2010, 05:26 AM
I was doing my best to try to distinguish them from the Poles and Russians and what not who have displaced the Germans who were living there.

I honestly don't know much about the migration patterns of these sub-races or how they mixed and so on, but that is why I am here, to learn :thumbup

Gardisten
Monday, May 24th, 2010, 06:21 PM
East Prussian are far from being extinct.

Vlad Cletus
Saturday, June 5th, 2010, 04:16 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Baltic_Tribes_c_1200.svg

Baltic Tribes

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/45/Balt%C5%B3_gentys_12-as_am%C5%BEius.svg

http://www.ihffilm.com/herkusmantas.html

Herkus Mantas is a Lithuanian film about the BALTIC Prussian uprising against the GERMAN Teutonic Knights!

Gardisten
Saturday, June 5th, 2010, 05:03 AM
I will re-state and re-phrase the statement. You all need to understand that the original and true Prussians were NOT Germanic but BALTIC. In fact, it can be argued that many of these Prussians that you all speak of are just Germanized Balts who lost their cultural identification through colonization before and after the fall of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, many resemble the Baltic and Aistin 'sub-races'. If you can even use such a term.

No, my Prussian ancestors were Germans. Period. The Prussians that we talk about were a distinct German people, and the conquered Slavs that occupied the land for several centuries were never "true" Prussians and are of no consequence. They are, at best, an interesting historical footnote.

Vlad Cletus
Saturday, June 5th, 2010, 05:12 AM
What are you talking about? Slavs are NOT Balts. Pardon me if I sound provocative, but perhaps you did not know such a group existed or you just lapse the two together out of ignorance. Along with Finnic peoples, Baltic peoples have lived in this region for millennia. I'm talking about history that took place long BEFORE the 20th century and the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

I don't necessarily question your individual family's ancestors, but I would not be surprised if what I stated earlier holds firm to an extent.

What we have come to know about the Prussians who emerged later in history for in terms of culture and mannerisms is arguably "Germanic" or has come to define a sort of cultural amalgamation that is German, that goes without question. However, I am arguing that the original people who did possess the name Prussian or Prūsai were a Baltic people, and those people inhabited that region long before the Germans came and colonized it.

Gardisten
Saturday, June 5th, 2010, 05:01 PM
Nope. That's what I'm talking about. They're not significant, nothing better than a footnote in history. When one talks about Prussian, what one is referring to is the people that arose out of the German colonists. These are the only "real" Prussians.

Vlad Cletus
Saturday, June 5th, 2010, 05:58 PM
Your arrogance is very prevalent and a bit disturbing. If these Baltic people did not exist then the Germans who colonized that area would have not adopted that name. And it truly is unfortunate that when a person, who isn't so well read or is just ignorant, does think of the Prussians he or she thinks of the Germans. Then again, just because certain aspects of history are not well-known does not mean they should not merit importance. If anything, these facets could be used to re-construct missing aspects of history and chronology thereby making unknown history even more important.

The Prūsai are much more than a footnote in history, so much that they staged an uprising and later tribes related to them screwed over the Teutonic Order in a number of battles including Saulė (present day Šiauliai). In the end, this all culminated in the complete dismemberment of the invading Teutonic Order through the slaughtering of its leadership in the Battle of Žalgiris by Lithuanians, Poles, Romanians, Tatars and others. The main Teutonic force although superior in arms and equipment was nonetheless overwhelmed and destroyed. Your pure and "holy" Teutonic Order was smashed not only by a force of Christians, but also Pagans and Muslims, a very mixed force. The order was never to be the same again.

Herkus Mantas (http://www.ihffilm.com/herkusmantas.html)

A historical drama about the 13th century Prussian uprising against the German Knights of the Cross. The film is notable for the romantic approach and the admirable reflection on the tragedy of the Prussian people and the historical events that followed. It is a memorial to the original but now extinct Prussians, a nation whose language and culture was closely related to Lithuanians. Lithuania, 1972, directed by Marijonas Giedrys. B&W, 136 minutes, Lithuanian dialogue.

Check out this film as it attests to the fact that the Prūsai were much more than a footnote in history.

Perhaps we're de-railing this thread now, so maybe we should reconsider where the discussion is going.

Gardisten
Sunday, June 6th, 2010, 07:45 AM
It's only the truth. Call it arrogant, or whatever you will, it's still simply the truth. The only "real" Prussians were Germans. Why you're trying to argue otherwise is a little puzzling. What's your real purpose here?

BTW, a belated congratulations on getting your first "Thanks" vote. 200+ posts and that was your first one. Interesting!

Vlad Cletus
Sunday, June 6th, 2010, 08:30 AM
If we're just arguing over the etymology and name here you have a fallacy on your hands. The name Prūsai and the people associated with it were Baltic. If these people had never existed the Germans would have never attributed it to themselves as a name or to a territory.

You can insult me as much as you want, as it doesn't diminish me as a person. I haven't logged on this forum for years up until this point, not to mention I haven't posted in years. And as you can imagine, I have no idea as to when the voting system was implemented. Anyways, you don't have to worry about me hanging around or about too much here. I'm not compatible with the orientation and in addition it does not interest me too greatly.

Bernhard
Sunday, June 6th, 2010, 08:35 AM
It's only the truth. Call it arrogant, or whatever you will, it's still simply the truth. The only "real" Prussians were Germans. Why you're trying to argue otherwise is a little puzzling. What's your real purpose here?



It is also an historical fact that the Baltic tribes who lived in those lands before the German colonists were called Prussians. Whatever your personal opinion is on these people does not change this. Simply because you don't think they have been of any importance, does not change the fact that they were a baltic people who were called prussians.

But well, I don't think this is of any relevance to this thread since it is obvious that we are talking about the Germanic Prussians here, the Germans (and Dutch) people who colonized Prussia and became known as Prussians. Yes, they bear the same name, but that doesn't mean they aren't "real" Prussians.

Sigurd
Sunday, June 6th, 2010, 10:36 PM
When one talks about Prussian, what one is referring to is the people that arose out of the German colonists. These are the only "real" Prussians.

When the colonists came, these people didn't simply vanish into thin air. Many people in the countryside still spoke the language for several centuries, the idea that there exists a Protestant Cathecism suggests that it was still used fairly widespread until at least the 16th century.

The date for the extinction of the language is believed to be in the early 18th century. Some words like Kurp for shoe entered the Low German dialect of the region. Some phraseologisms also remained.

Aside from those Baltic Prussians, there were also roughly 120,000 Prussian Lithuanians mentioned in the 1890 census, rising to approx. 150,000 (out of 2.49 million) by 1939.

Other than this, there were also Slavic Masurians who lived in the Southern part of East Prussia. In 1939, of the 2.49 million inhabitants of East Prussia, 85% were German indeed, but there was also a number of other populations involved.

Typically, with Soviet coming, these groups tended to have to flee as well. There is a book, Ostpreußische Lebensläufe by Ulla Lachauer which attempted to document East Prussian stories, especially of those who had to flee. These include Prussians of all backgrounds, despite the anti-NS undertone of parts it is well worth the read for those who can speak German; it mentions the plight of some Germans as well as I believe one Lithuanian case, etc.

Anyway, the number of mixed-marriages or Germanisations dating back to Old Prussian time is a dark number, which we cannot bring back. I would wager that German (and other) colonists were in the majority, though there would have been a good number of people who were simply Germanised. Then again, that was the case for several other parts of the area we now know as Germany anyway. :P


BTW, a belated congratulations on getting your first "Thanks" vote. 200+ posts and that was your first one. Interesting!

Here I must point out that this is an unfair statement, considering the date that this modification was added to Skadi, which was I believe somewhen during 2006. Being an old registration, this member last made a number of posts in 2005 before he came back into this thread, hence a while before the "Thanks" option was around. ;)

Myrkwid
Sunday, June 27th, 2010, 05:46 PM
The old prussian were the last heathen people in "Germany". But it wasn`t a germanic religion. The religion was very similiar to the old lituanian religion.
So they were not germanic! But in very old time (about the years 0-150 AD) the prussian lived in good neighborhood with the goths - and the mixed with them a little bit!

Hilderinc
Monday, June 28th, 2010, 02:42 AM
Yes, the Prussians were the last group to be converted to Christianity, I attached a good map with the dates of how Europe was converted.

Also, I found this map on wikipedia that says Vikings settled in Prussia in the tenth century. Yes, I know wikipedia is bad, and the maps are worse.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/50/Viking_Expansion.svg/2000px-Viking_Expansion.svg.png


Anyone know anything about the Goths/Vikings mixing with the Old Prussians? I think the discussion of non-Germanic Prussians in this thread is important, as we Germanics aren't the only people, you know. ;)

Gardisten
Monday, June 28th, 2010, 03:26 AM
This is not relevant to the OP. The question is about the continued existence of the East Prussian, the German people who were residing in the region when it was lost to the Soviets.

Sigurd
Monday, June 28th, 2010, 09:03 AM
This is not relevant to the OP. The question is about the continued existence of the East Prussian, the German people who were residing in the region when it was lost to the Soviets.

NorseWarrior is the OP. Let him decide what he considers relevant to his own thread, and what questions he wishes to be raised in his thread. If he wishes to inquire also about non-German Germanic settlement, and the extent of mixture with non-Germanic elements altogether, then let that be his question as well. :P

Hilderinc
Monday, June 28th, 2010, 11:49 PM
I mean, I just think it would be easier to have information about Prussians in just one thread, rather than making many threads on very specific things

theTasmanian
Tuesday, June 29th, 2010, 02:38 PM
Yes, the Prussians were the last group to be converted to Christianity, I attached a good map with the dates of how Europe was converted.

Also, I found this map on wikipedia that says Vikings settled in Prussia in the tenth century. Yes, I know wikipedia is bad, and the maps are worse.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/50/Viking_Expansion.svg/2000px-Viking_Expansion.svg.png


Anyone know anything about the Goths/Vikings mixing with the Old Prussians? I think the discussion of non-Germanic Prussians in this thread is important, as we Germanics aren't the only people, you know. ;)


hmm i don't know about that ...if you mean the last Germanic's or last people in that general area

Because after Prussia (it was what is regarded as "old Prussia" Baltic people) it was Lithuanian ,Estonian ,Latvia that got converted

Myrkwid
Tuesday, June 29th, 2010, 09:07 PM
There was a gothic/prussian mixture in the first Century, but it was't so strong to have an influence to both folks. The vikings haven't much to do with the prussians. The vikings settled in the baltic coast of germany (Vineta, Jomsburg etc.) and vikings from norge were the first Kings of the polish tribes (Dago). Anywhere there wasn't any mixture between vikings and prussians.
Excuse me for my bad english, i'm only a lumberjack...;)

Smirky
Tuesday, June 29th, 2010, 09:31 PM
My father's side of the family came from West Prussia, but originated in Livonia. Through some arrangement with the Prussian nobility they moved to what is now Germany. My mother's side was from East Prussia and moved here in 1878. My father's name, and hence mine, is German sounding. My mother's father's name is Wollschlegger and his wife was named Koplin. One sounds very Germanic and the other not so much. I'm not sure where my mother's side originated, but there were many migrations of people due to war, weather, and many other reasons. People tend to call themselves by whatever region they live in, so who really knows what any modern man is?

MotivationMan
Tuesday, June 29th, 2010, 09:52 PM
It is a funny thing that people like to dwell on the holocaust when some ethnic groups really were destroyed in that war. Ever heard of a Volga German? There were millions of them at one point.

Edgard
Friday, April 22nd, 2011, 10:38 AM
We're were starting to slowly lose East Prussia to the Slavs after the war...:thumbdown thats terrible, we've got to start taking the land back, whats the terrain like over there may I ask?

Thats easy. Poland is in the EU, just move to the EU and buy a house there. Its really nice, lots of hills and timber framed houses and the Polish look more Germanic/Nordic in that part of the land. The sea keeps it cooler in summer but is still bright and warm, with sandy beaches. You can take a boat over to Sweden if you like as well for a day trip. I am thinking of moving there. England is finished as far as I can See :( and much of the EU is going the same way. You wont see a dark face (not yet anyway). Polish have no concept of Political correctness yet and will use violence to uphold their way of life.

Edgard
Thursday, May 19th, 2011, 10:50 PM
Thats easy. Poland is in the EU, just move to the EU and buy a house there. Its really nice, lots of hills and timber framed houses and the Polish look more Germanic/Nordic in that part of the land. The sea keeps it cooler in summer but is still bright and warm, with sandy beaches. You can take a boat over to Sweden if you like as well for a day trip. I am thinking of moving there. England is finished as far as I can See :( and much of the EU is going the same way. You wont see a dark face (not yet anyway). Polish have no concept of Political correctness yet and will use violence to uphold their way of life.

East Prussia is a beautiful place.

http://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=108248&d=1305841751

Edgard
Thursday, May 19th, 2011, 10:59 PM
East Prussia is a beautiful place.

http://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=108248&d=1305841751

Some more

http://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=108249&d=1305842220

http://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=108250&d=1305842220

http://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=108251&d=1305842220

BlessedGoddess
Wednesday, May 25th, 2011, 08:39 PM
Prussians are still around. The boarders and names just changed. I have a few Prussian ancestors, myself. :)

aaronjabs
Tuesday, July 31st, 2012, 04:29 AM
I know that my family has always considered themselves unequivocally German, however, as referenced by my Oma (who I am fortunate to say is still with us at 102 years of age) our family came from Prussia. Both she, my Opa, and my father came from the area known as the Dobriner Land along the Weischsel River just south of Torun. She from Wolschebuden (Makowiska in Polish) and my father and Opa from Lentzen (Wlecz in Polish). Upon being expelled from the area with all other Germans at the end of WWII she fled with my father and other family members to Germany where they resided for another 4 years before emmigrating to Canada in the footsteps of earlier relatives.

Aaron

Van Wellenkamp
Tuesday, July 31st, 2012, 12:22 PM
My relatives refer to themselves as Prussians as well.

I to have an Oma of age. 96 currently and she has been a huge influence in my life. We are truly blessed and fortunate, you and I.

aaronjabs
Tuesday, July 31st, 2012, 06:26 PM
Yes, I couldn't agree more; the stories I have heard from her over the years and the family history she has been able to provide me with has been tremendous.