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friedrich braun
Thursday, December 9th, 2004, 03:00 PM
Ghetto woes afflict Russian-Germans

By Ray Furlong, BBC News, Berlin


A new immigration law set to come into force next month may mean the end of a dream for hundreds of thousands of people in the former Soviet Union who had high hopes of a new life in Germany. The so-called "Russian-Germans" are descendents of immigrants invited to Russia by Catherine the Great in the 18th Century.

Oppressed during the Soviet era, they were allowed to leave for Germany by Mikhail Gorbachev in the 1980s, and more than two million have done so. But Germany wants to stop the influx, concerned that the new arrivals are living in self-created ghettoes.

In the Berlin district of Marzahn, for instance, there are 13,000 Russian-Germans. Russian newspapers are on sale at the newsagent, there is a shop with Russian food products, and at Saturday morning football the only language in the air is Russian. "This is a youth outreach programme for marginalised groups," says Wolfgang Zeiser, a community worker who organises the football.

"The kids here have typical immigration problems, arrival in a new country where everything is strange: the language, the laws, everything."


Uprooted

The football is organised to keep the young Russian-Germans off the streets. Marzahn is an enormous high-rise estate dating from communist times - blighted by mass unemployment, drugs and crime. "It's terrible here. It's full of drug addicts because there's nothing to do," says 18-year-old Wilhelm Halster, in the street-slang he has acquired since coming here from Kazakhstan four years ago.

"There's no chance of getting a job and there's nothing going on. So you just hang around and then go to a dealer to buy something. That's all we do." There is a whole generation of kids like Wilhelm: uprooted from their homes as teenagers, alienated in Germany.


Violence

The issue was recently brought to national attention by a dramatic court case involving a 21-year-old Russian-German accused of being a gang leader, whose drug-trade turf wars allegedly left a trail of cold-blooded murder across the country. These young people have very poor chances to get jobs or apprenticeships...

The new immigration law coming into force next month puts strict language requirements on Russian-Germans and their family members wishing to come to Germany. "I think we are forced to do these steps, for we have problems with these young, not integrated ethnic Germans," says Cornelie Sonntag-Wolhgast, head of the German parliamentary committee responsible for immigration.

"Most of those people who come now are young people who come with their parents and grandparents, and they are nearly unable to speak German." "These young people have very poor chances to get jobs or apprenticeships. So they don't know what to do. They are often aggressive or violent... and that's not good for integration at all."


RUSSIAN-GERMANS

Thousands moved to Russia in 18th Century
Granted their own autonomous republic on the Volga River
USSR banned German language during World War II and Stalin deported ethnic Germans east
Two million ethnic Germans have settled in Germany since late 1980s

But the Russian-Germans themselves feel they are being victimised by media stereotypes. They do not have a strong lobby to point out that there are also success stories in the community. At the Thueringer Oberschule in Marzahn, one in four of the pupils comes from the former Soviet Union. By what is called a "systematic orientation" towards their special needs, it has achieved success: 44% of them leave with good enough results to go on to grammar school.

Alexander Reiser, formerly a journalist in Vladivostok, now a social worker in Marzahn, says the new law will have disastrous consequences. "Imagine the case of a 60-year-old ethnic German. He speaks German, but his Russian wife doesn't - it's unrealistic that she will learn," he says.

"The same goes for the kids who have grown up in a Russian-speaking environment." "I also think of thousands of cases where parents will be unable to join their children who have already moved to Germany. Families will be divided."


Language barrier

Language is perhaps the biggest problem for the community. Speaking German was banned in Russia during World War I, and the community was further oppressed by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin. Around the corner from Alexander Reiser's office a small class of middle-aged Russian-German women grapple with verb conjugations, helped by Mariana Fox, a retired Russian teacher who lives nearby.

"I want to help them speak their mother language," Ms Fox says. "They are our brothers and sisters. "They are German, they're not Russian. They can't speak the language because it was forbidden." The ladies here all have stories to tell of how difficult coming to Germany has been. Eliana Waitzin, 50, says she knew nothing about Germany when she came here two years ago.

Her family had problems with papers, and also finding a flat. Another woman says her daughter-in-law, a qualified architect, is working as a cleaner. But her son has a good job as a sales manager - and her grandchildren are doing well at school. "They speak German perfectly. They speak a little bit of Russian, but only to me," she says.

Some Russian-Germans feel let down by Germany, a land they came to hoping for a better life. But many Germans blame them for failing to adapt. After 200 years in Russia, this has been anything but a fairytale homecoming.


Story from BBC NEWS

Zyklop
Thursday, December 9th, 2004, 07:09 PM
First of all, there are no "Russian-Germans" as there are no "Turkish-Germans".
And most of those Russia-Germans nowadays are either fakes or Russians with less than 1/8 German ancestry.

Siebenbürgerin
Tuesday, January 6th, 2009, 07:10 PM
(Source: Daily News Bulletin; Moscow - English)KALININGRAD. Dec 14 (Interfax) - Most ethnic Germans from the former USSR, who now live in Germany and wish to go back to Russia under the voluntary resettlement program, are choosing the Kaliningrad region, according to the Kaliningrad regional government deputy minister for area development and liaisons with local authorities, Alexander Mezentsev said after returning from Germany, the regional government's press office said.

He was attending a roundtable in Frankfurt-am-Main focused on the governmental program to assist fellow countrymen abroad to voluntarily resettle to Russia.

According to Atlant, a public organization set up by Russian- speaking Germans in the federal land of North Rhine-Westphalia, around 4,000 people in this region said they wanted to return to Russia, and 90% of them chose the Kaliningrad region as permanent residence.

"However, the program of resettling from Germany to Russia saw only four people arrive, another 14 applications are currently being processed," the press office said.

One of the reasons why this is happening is because there is only one body in this German federal land, which is authorized to act under the program - the Russian Consulate General in Bonn. Another reason is insufficient information and counseling which does not allow potential resettlers to Russia to promptly receive answers to their questions about the program and participation terms and conditions.

The article:
http://www.istockanalyst.com/article/viewiStockNews/articleid/2880036

Thusnelda
Tuesday, January 6th, 2009, 07:49 PM
I think most of those who want to go back to Russia are no real Germans. Some of them only wear a German surname but are Russian to the bones. The fact that they´re handled as "Aussiedler" doesn´t change much on this matter. The heart matters, and if they can´t even speak proper German then it makes no sense to stay here. If they feel Russian than no one should hold them back.

So they´re no big loss from my point of view. :)

Sissi
Tuesday, January 6th, 2009, 08:13 PM
I know there are Russians who pretend to be ethnic Germans, but those usually do it out of some kind of interest and if they have something to gain in Germany, they wouldn't return to Russia, would they? I think it's more linked to lifestyle than anything. Russian and German lifestyle are different and some might find it difficult to adapt to the situation in the FRG. It's not easy to move to a new country after you were born and raised in another and your family was there for centuries. I wonder why most of them are choosing Kaliningrad. It was an originally German city by the name of Königsberg. Is there a strong and influential German community there?

Hauke Haien
Tuesday, January 6th, 2009, 09:34 PM
No, there is nothing in northern East Prussia. I assume that they are looking for a way to reconcile their two identities in a culturally Russian place with German history. Perhaps one or two of them even see it as some kind of recolonisation effort. Their presence might turn out to be helpful, or not. I have thought about becoming a colonist myself, but it is really pointless without a full-fledged community capable of maintaining political resistance against the host country. The last thing I want for my descendants is that they become Russian Germans or worse, German-Russians in an American sense.

Inese
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 09:59 AM
If the "Russian Germans" are the same as the "Russian Latvians" then it is good that they go! There is a lare " Russian-German"community near and they behave not nice and not German. Most of them look and behave like normal Russians and only some like real Germans.

TheGreatest
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 11:24 AM
As someone wrote on surnames. When a German Man settled in Russia in the 1600's and married a Russian woman, his children married Russians, Grandchildren married Russians and eventually all that was left was the surname.


Likewise in Germany, some Germans have Polish surnames but that does not mean they are Poles, despite that one paternal Grandfather, the remainder of the persons ancestors have been ethnic Germans.

The problem with the law of return is that it favored the people with these German surnames, who were not VD and had less than 2% German ancestry.


If the "Russian Germans" are the same as the "Russian Latvians" then it is good that they go! There is a lare " Russian-German"community near and they behave not nice and not German. Most of them look and behave like normal Russians and only some like real Germans.



I've had enough experience with Russians (and Poles) in general to state that George Patton was right about them. We can't understand Russian no more than we can understand Japanese.

rainman
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 03:14 PM
Germans were always in East Europe from the early days when the race expanded from its birth (from an Aryan root tribe) somewhere around southern Sweden. There were many tribes that spoke German and had German culture- entire cities of them. Then Eastward settlement created whole regions of Germans. I forget the name of the area but it was very far East along the Russian frontier. Russians were not too successful settling it so poor Germans wrestled the land from nature.

Then when Germans attacked in WWII most of them were killed. I mean civilians destroyed to purge Russia of its German element. Also the Soviet Union purposely "integrated" people by moving them around and encouraging mixed marriages. They also forced everyone to speak Russian. Here these people had German culture and language for Generations and they were forced away from it. The oldest written Germanic language of Gothic comes from the East.

But I mean some of the settlements were as late as the late 1800s. And some of the German blood dates back to the Vikings or before. There is a heavy Germanic element in East Europe- but it has just been diluted purposely by the Soviet Union.

TheGreatest
Thursday, January 8th, 2009, 09:06 AM
Germans were always in East Europe from the early days when the race expanded from its birth (from an Aryan root tribe) somewhere around southern Sweden. There were many tribes that spoke German and had German culture- entire cities of them. Then Eastward settlement created whole regions of Germans. I forget the name of the area but it was very far East along the Russian frontier. Russians were not too successful settling it so poor Germans wrestled the land from nature.

Then when Germans attacked in WWII most of them were killed. I mean civilians destroyed to purge Russia of its German element. Also the Soviet Union purposely "integrated" people by moving them around and encouraging mixed marriages. They also forced everyone to speak Russian. Here these people had German culture and language for Generations and they were forced away from it. The oldest written Germanic language of Gothic comes from the East.

But I mean some of the settlements were as late as the late 1800s. And some of the German blood dates back to the Vikings or before. There is a heavy Germanic element in East Europe- but it has just been diluted purposely by the Soviet Union.

The Soviet Union was not in the 1800s. It started in the 1920's. And most of the VD community had already left for the United States and Canada in the 1860's and 1870's. There was also another migration exodus after WW1 and during the Interwar Period.


There wasn't a lot of VD left for the Soviets to dilute. Even though the Volga Germans received a lot of fame for their struggles in the Soviet Union, there were far more Volga Germans in the New World than in the old.

Gustavus Magnus
Monday, January 19th, 2009, 01:20 AM
I've noticed almost half of the posters in this thread identifies themselves as German though living abroad in what used to be German lands.

Do you believe that a German community in Königsberg could survive and remain German in culture, about the same way you enjoy a German community where you live? If you don't consider your home a part of the German community, do you want to move to Germany? Would you be willing to move to another German community in, say East Prussia?

I'm fascinated by former German regions so repopulating Prussia would be extremely exciting, though only a fantasy.

Sigurd
Monday, January 19th, 2009, 02:34 AM
As for the repopulisation effort, it is an idea that has struck me for a while, too as a worthwhile project. I would however not be joining these efforts by personally moving: I may have some Silesian as well as some Prussian ancestry a fair while back, but I'm happy in my Bajuvarian Hideout as it were. ;)

We aren't going to get back our lost lands in the East via plebiscites, as I still am hopeful for will eventually happen in South Tyrol. We aren't going to be able to do either is "doing a Hitler" in laying claim to these lands in diplomatic negotiations, as the Germans there are a minority. And as for military action --- whilst the current framework persists, that'd be plain suicide.

However, let's face it --- encouraging their fellow folk to move to Kosovo, an originally very Serbian area and heartland of Serbia over time has made them the majority in that area. The Muslims in our country are likewise showing us that overthrowing by settlement is the easiest way forward. As such, we might just as well adopt these techniques and start to lay claim to lands that are by rights ours.

Prussia might be a little hard to retake at present, even though there had been offers by Russia in the 90s to return their portion (Germany declined after the US was against it. :|). It would be most easily done by settling in Silesia, which still has a sizeable German population in excess of 150,000 which is more than in any other former German area. And once Silesia is taken, move on to Pomerania. And with Pomerania and Silesia repopulated by ours, Prussia will be an easy task.

Then, when that is done, we might eventually, in a few decades, be able to lay claim to these lands by pointing out that we constitute the majority in said areas. ;)

We have done this once before, so let's do it again! :thumbup:

Oswiu
Friday, January 23rd, 2009, 11:23 PM
When a German Man settled in Russia in the 1600's and married a Russian woman, his children married Russians, Grandchildren married Russians and eventually all that was left was the surname.
THAT is a hypothetical situation dreamt up in the New World by a young man in front of a PC monitor. Historical reality is rather different. At that early period, religion separated the incomers from the natives. Laws and practice kept them in 'Slobody', ethnic communes you might say, in certain specified regions. German immigration under Ivan IV and the pre-Petrine Romanovs was of a largely urban character, restricted to artisans and mercenaries who were useful to the military projects of the rulers of the day. Early incomers who converted to Orthodoxy generally adopted a Russified name, and so their descendants are invisible today.

I've had enough experience with Russians (and Poles) in general to state that George Patton was right about them. We can't understand Russian no more than we can understand Japanese.
Speak for yourself. I understand them just fine. Patton was clearly an unimaginative man with a chip on his shoulder about the Soviets. And Soviet politics had an internal logic of its own, not identically equal to Russianness or Slavonicness.

Then Eastward settlement created whole regions of Germans. I forget the name of the area but it was very far East along the Russian frontier.
Orenburg, do you have in mind? In the Russian nook of steppe against Kazakhstan's northwestern border? The area was taken by Russian Cossacks, I don't know the details but perhaps peasants were not so easily found to colonise in a more permanent sense, given the fact that most of them were to be found under PRIVATE OWNERSHIP at the time! Runaway serfs liked nothing better than to settle the free lands of the Wild Field in the south and east, WHEN they had the chance.

Then when Germans attacked in WWII most of them were killed. I mean civilians destroyed to purge Russia of its German element.
I have had several acquaintances over there with German surnames, and some with French, and one peculiarly English sounding name behind the orthography, but most of these couldn't remember the origins of these, arguing for much voluntary assimilation in the Nineteenth Century, at least of Moscow and Peterburg dwelling foreigners.

Ajaxhan
Tuesday, January 27th, 2009, 05:38 AM
THAT is a hypothetical situation dreamt up in the New World by a young man in front of a PC monitor. Historical reality is rather different. At that early period, religion separated the incomers from the natives. Laws and practice kept them in 'Slobody', ethnic communes you might say, in certain specified regions. German immigration under Ivan IV and the pre-Petrine Romanovs was of a largely urban character, restricted to artisans and mercenaries who were useful to the military projects of the rulers of the day. Early incomers who converted to Orthodoxy generally adopted a Russified name, and so their descendants are invisible today.


Even though I am not one, I live in a community that is mainly made up of "Germans from Russia," and what I've heard from people around here is consistent with what you've said. What I've heard is that they lived in communities that were very isolated from much of Russian society. I know that even after they immigrated to North Dakota, they spoke German and retained very much German heritage.

Hauke Haien
Thursday, January 29th, 2009, 07:30 AM
Do you believe that a German community in Königsberg could survive and remain German in culture,
Potentially, yes.


about the same way you enjoy a German community where you live?
You mean here in the FRG? :-O


If you don't consider your home a part of the German community, do you want to move to Germany? Would you be willing to move to another German community in, say East Prussia?
I would, if there is some perspective for its continued existence.


I'm fascinated by former German regions so repopulating Prussia would be extremely exciting, though only a fantasy.
Well, the direction is currently in the reverse. Siebenbürgen is de-Germanising and the economically productive FRG citizens are defecting to the Anglosphere (= the part of the global West that happens to be English-speaking), rather than colonising adjacent territory in Europe.

Siebenbürgerin
Saturday, January 31st, 2009, 12:59 PM
I've noticed almost half of the posters in this thread identifies themselves as German though living abroad in what used to be German lands.

Do you believe that a German community in Königsberg could survive and remain German in culture, about the same way you enjoy a German community where you live?
I believe it could be possible if the German ethnics decided to stay there. But they're immigrating to Germany so it's the same case as the German communities here. If everyone immigrates, it becomes smaller and smaller. Some are going for better economic prosperity because Eastern Europe is economically more backwards than the Western part.


If you don't consider your home a part of the German community, do you want to move to Germany? Would you be willing to move to another German community in, say East Prussia?
You know the saying, "Germany is wherever Germans dwell". There are less Germans here and so ultimately if we want to survive we will have to move where there are more Germans. That isn't the case of East Prussia. It can only be the case of Germany, Austria, Switzerland or another country with large German numbers.


I'm fascinated by former German regions so repopulating Prussia would be extremely exciting, though only a fantasy.
I'm understanding Kaliningrad was offered to Germany back in exchange for a lot of money but the leaders then refused. I'm not so sure about it, I'm thinking someone from Germany could clarify it.


THAT is a hypothetical situation dreamt up in the New World by a young man in front of a PC monitor. Historical reality is rather different. At that early period, religion separated the incomers from the natives. Laws and practice kept them in 'Slobody', ethnic communes you might say, in certain specified regions. German immigration under Ivan IV and the pre-Petrine Romanovs was of a largely urban character, restricted to artisans and mercenaries who were useful to the military projects of the rulers of the day. Early incomers who converted to Orthodoxy generally adopted a Russified name, and so their descendants are invisible today.
Thank you for this clarification. It's very important to clarify the situation of the German ethnics from Europe. Because many peoples assume they're so mixed with the natives they aren't German anymore.

Ocko
Friday, January 29th, 2010, 11:46 PM
This is a rehash of a 3 year old article:


Russia Hopes to Lure Back Ethnic Germans

By Sonia Phalnikar

Großansicht des Bildes mit der Bildunterschrift: German Chancellor Merkel with ethnic Germans in the Siberian city of Tomsk last yearAround 2.3 million ethnic Germans from the former Soviet Union have emigrated to Germany since 1991. Faced with a demographic crisis, Russia is now trying to woo them back.

Russian news agency Interfax reported this week that Moscow will spend over 80 million euros ($110 million) by 2012 to entice back former citizens of German descent who have immigrated to Germany as well as to stem the further westward flight of its ethnic German minority. The money is to be mainly invested in industrial centers in Western Siberia and the Volga region.

German immigrants were invited to Russia during the 18th century by Czarina Catherine the Great, herself a German princess. Oppressed during the Soviet era, their descendants were sent into forced exile to Kazakhstan and other remote areas by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin.

With the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, some 2.3 million of them had come to Germany by 2005, drawn by nearly automatic citizenship offered by Berlin and a desire to get to know their roots. Ethnic German emigrants from Russia make up the largest group of the 4.5 million people with ethnic German heritage who migrated to Germany.

Russia's efforts to help the social and economic development of its remaining and dwindling ethnic German community -- 600,000, according to official figures -- have been welcomed by Berlin. Over the past years, President Vladimir Putin's administration, aided by generous financial backing from the German government, has launched a number of programs towards that purpose.


Berlin not happy with Russian stance

But Moscow's efforts to lure back its former citizens now living in Germany in order to plug domestic labor shortages have sparked a less than enthusiastic response in Berlin.

With one of the world's lowest life expectancy rates and falling birth rates, Russia faces a demographic problem with economic consequences. According to a UN study, Russia will need two million immigrants in the next decade to maintain economic growth.

Last year, Putin's government invested heavily in infrastructure and housing in Siberia, particularly in the city of Novosibirsk, to draw ethnic Germans living abroad. Those who returned were offered 3,000 euros ($4,106), travel compensation and free transportation of their belongings.

The German government's commissioner for ethnic Germans and national minorities, Christoph Bergner, emphasized that the German government will "not guarantee any support, either financial or moral," to ethnic Germans wishing to move back to Russia.

Speaking at a press conference last month in the economically flourishing Russian exclave of Kaliningrad, Bergner said no one could expect Berlin to promote the flight of young, skilled workers at a time when Germany itself was struggling with a low birth rate and major skills shortage.


Getting ready to leave again

Experts, however, point out that the reverse migratory trend is already underway with ethnic Germans who migrated to Germany packing their bags for Russia.

Elmar Welt, who works for a charity called "Heimgarten," which was founded to help the repatriation of war refugees, said the organization has been sought out by over 700 Russian-Germans wishing to move back to Russia and parts of the former Soviet Union.

Bildunterschrift: Großansicht des Bildes mit der Bildunterschrift: Older ethnic Germans living in Germany sometimes want to go back to Russia for personal reasons. While some want to go back because they feel isolated, miss Russian culture and have problems learning the German language, Welt said, the prospect of getting well-valued work remains a major attraction.

"Many ethnic Germans in Germany suffer from complexes because their degrees aren't recognized in Germany with the result that you have teachers and engineers working as cleaning staff," said Welt. "Now, they have a chance to use their skills."

According to the organization, Kazakhstan alone over the past two years has awarded new passports to over 2,000 ethnic Germans returning from Germany.


Just a trickle

Whatever drives an ethnic German to return to Russia, some say it would be a mistake to make too much of the numbers opting to go back to the former Soviet Union. Reports differ on the actual number. Russian Web site "Russland-Aktuell" reported that in Kaliningrad, despite 12,000 enquires since last year, only 17 people had moved to the booming Russian exclave -- most of them Russian families from Latvia.

Viktor Krieger, an expert on Russia at the University of Heidelberg, said only a fraction of ethnic Germans in Germany were leaving.

"More than 95 percent of them are staying because they're rooted here in Germany and are treated as equals," Krieger said. "You have to actually wonder why so few are going back."

The problem with Moscow's plans to lure back ethnic Germans was that it failed to mention a single word about revitalizing the ethnic German community in Russia and focuses on developing agriculture and rural areas, Krieger said. "There's nothing in there about setting up a German museum, a university or a research institute for ethnic German culture," he said.



Source: http://http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,2144,2772792,00.html (http://forums.skadi.net/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fhttp%3A% 2F%2Fwww.dw-world.de%2Fdw%2Farticle%2F0%2C2144%2C277 2792%2C00.html)

Ocko
Friday, January 29th, 2010, 11:48 PM
meanwhile Russia has a positive incline in the birthrate and can sustain now itself.

Hauke Haien
Saturday, January 30th, 2010, 01:19 AM
United Nations World Population Prospects: 2006 revision, Table A.15 (http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wpp2006/WPP2006_Highlights_rev.pdf)


Fertility rate
(2000-2005)
(births/woman)

Federal Republic 1.35
Russia 1.30
Fertility rate
(2005-2010)
(births/woman)


Federal Republic 1.36
Russia 1.34

As a rule, all those "conservative" and "White Nationalist" Slav cesspools are even less fertile than the Germanic territories and the same is true for most "tradionalist" Mediterranean countries with the exception of France, which has lots of fertile Islamic Frenchlings.

In other words, one might as well stay put and devise a proper way of life to carve new living space out of familiar territory.

Ocko
Saturday, January 30th, 2010, 10:13 PM
I found this article:


Russian birth rate at 15-year high
AXcess News ^ | Tuesday, 13 October 2009

Posted on Tuesday, October 13, 2009 4:50:32 PM by MinorityRepublican

Its not that Russian's aren't giving birth to children, its just that the number of births is exceeding the number of deaths for the first time in fifteen years.

Russia's Health Ministry is taking credit for increase in birth rate, citing the economic stimulus program approved by the Kremlin as the reason why more mothers in Russia are giving birth and fewer people are dying.

But you can't argue with the numbers. On an annualized basis, Russia's birth rate is up between 7 and 8 percent. In August alone, 1000 more people were born than died.

According to UN, Russia's population has shrunk by 6.6 million people since 1993, and could lose 11 million more by 2025.

"What we are seeing today is a temporary fluctuation," said Igor Beloborodov, director of the Institute of Demographic Studies. "We can't define this as an improvement. The general situation in Russia and in Europe is really a demographic chasm."

Short-term financial measures aren't going to change that significantly, he said. "As society becomes more secularised, and as the family breaks apart, women keep having fewer children. Thirty per cent of babies are born out of wedlock, and up to 60 per cent of marriages fail."

The government has made raising the birthrate by at least 50 per cent a national priority, with Prime Minister Vladimir Putin and President Dmitry Medvedev drawing attention to demographic crisis. Measures since 2006 include larger maternity packages with paid maternity leave for up to 18 months, and full salary compensation for four months. The so-called "maternity capital" gives women who have a second child $10,000 for housing or education.

These measures have certainly had effect on the latest spike, but they won't solve the demographic chasm, said Sergei Zakharov, a demographics expert at the Higher School of Economics.


(Excerpt) Read more at axcessnews.com ...

thirsty
Wednesday, February 3rd, 2010, 03:50 AM
Makes a lot of sense, Putin is one of the world's biggest germanophiles, and that is not a bad thing.

Gardisten
Thursday, February 4th, 2010, 01:37 AM
In order for Russia to succeed at wooing anyone back, they should really undertake a massive overhaul of the corrupt political, economic, and social system that currently exists. I just don't see how an honest, hardworking person can excel, let alone simply prosper in the current Russia. Moreover, I find it hard to believe that anyone who returns to Russia would be guaranteed of anything, given Moscow's inherently abysmal treatment of ethnic minorities. Unless I'm missing something, I see no mention of the possibility of the creation of semi-autonomous regions and German-language rights.

Curator
Thursday, February 4th, 2010, 01:48 AM
I don't understand how anyone, German or otherwise, could be coaxed into living in Russia. That being said, maybe an act of good faith would help their cause. The return of Prussia to its rightful owners would be a good start.

Pink Floyd
Friday, June 11th, 2010, 07:12 AM
I have met several Russians who claimed to be ethnic Germans. They looked exactly like any german, as well.