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Ediruc
Thursday, December 24th, 2009, 10:17 AM
I'm a member of Clan Gordon. I was passed on the Gordon name as my middle name from one of my grand-uncles who immigrated from Scotland. He bore the name as a surname.

tinyterror
Monday, February 22nd, 2010, 09:32 AM
Im a member of the Houstoun Clan

Angus
Monday, February 22nd, 2010, 05:13 PM
Clan Lyon from my dads and Clan Redpath (a very unknown clan, as we got our arses handed to us and for the most part disbanded) from my mums side.

and Clan Lyon is a sept of the Farquharson's.

BlueEyedBeast
Tuesday, March 30th, 2010, 04:58 AM
I recently discovered that my Father's adopted Father was descended from Clan MacKay.

Winter Wolf
Saturday, April 3rd, 2010, 11:09 PM
I wish I knew. :~(

Loyalist
Sunday, April 4th, 2010, 12:12 AM
I am not actually a member of any clan, but I qualify for membership in Clans Sutherland, Donnachaidh, Grant, MacLaren, Douglas, Somerville, Hunter, and a few others, being a recent descendant of all of the aforementioned. The problem is that my direct paternal line, while from Scotland, is of ambiguous clan association. The American branch of Clan MacDuff claims my surname as a sept, but I have not been able to confirm that with any branch in Scotland itself. I would not feel at home in any association other than that which is linked to my paternal line, so I suppose it will remain a mystery for now.

Ralf
Sunday, April 4th, 2010, 02:58 AM
Not quite Scotish, but a border clan, on my Mothers side, one of the two foremost and notorious of the Riever clans from Northumberland.
We even had a painting done of us by Walter Scott I believe, and a Northumberland reel written about us.

Ediruc
Sunday, April 4th, 2010, 03:08 AM
I wish I knew. :~(

Is there any way you could find out? For example, surnames? Btw, it wasn't an uncle, I was mistaken, it was a grandfather on my mother's side. ;)

BlueEyedBeast
Sunday, April 4th, 2010, 05:08 AM
I wish I knew. :~(


Is there any way you could find out? For example, surnames?

Have you tried this?

Scottish Clan Finder (http://www.scotclans.com/whats_my_clan/)

Ediruc
Monday, April 5th, 2010, 09:23 PM
The name Gordon is territorial and the family who took the name are believed to have been of Anglo-Norman descent, moving from the Borders to Aberdeenshire. The wild boar’s head appears on the Gordon arms because, legend says, the first Gordon saved a Scottish king from an attacking boar.

http://www.scotclans.com/scottish_clans/clan_gordon/history.html

:clap :bravo :blueroll:


According to the text, the progenitor of the Gordon family in Scotland was Sir Adam de Gordon, who came to Scotland from Normandy during the reign of David I of Scotland (1124-1158).

http://www.kenmore.org/genealogy/gordon/gordon_history.html

:D

Zimobog
Monday, April 5th, 2010, 10:38 PM
Disbanded and disenfranchised McKinnon.

The Aesthete
Monday, May 3rd, 2010, 08:27 AM
Clan Hay

Diarmuid
Monday, May 3rd, 2010, 05:04 PM
Stuart of Bute. Also, my grandmother's last name was Rodger and I've been unable to find if that name would fit into a Scottish clan. I tend to think no because it sounds more Anglo-Norman.

Æğele Wiğercwida
Wednesday, May 5th, 2010, 03:30 AM
According to my Grandmother, we are descendants of the MacPhàrlain clan of the lowlands - though through a bastard, and the name is now long lost.


MacFarlane History
ScotClans ProductsThe MacFarlanes are descendants of the Earl of Lennox whose brother was to bestow the lands at Arrochar, by Loch Long, confirmed to Iain MacPharlain in 1420. When Earl Duncan of Lennox was executed by James I the MacFarlanes had a valid claim to the title, yet it was given to the Stewarts by the crown. Initially there was some dispute but they would remain loyal to the Stewarts.

The 13th chief fell against the English at the Battle of Pinkie 1547, during the minority of Mary Queen of Scots.

However they were to play a decisive part in her downfall at the Battle of Langside 1568. They returned their loyalty to the crown in 1645 when Walter the 16th chief fought under Montrose for Charles I. Oliver Cromwell was to burn the MacFarlane seat at Inveruglas, Loch Lomond, in his invasion of Scotland.

Walter MacFarlane the 20th chief was a noted antiquary and scholar, devoting his life to research to his country. The Arrochar seat was to be sold in 1767, when he died without heirs, by his brother.

The direct male line failed in 1887 and remained without a chief.

The family Name is now Rodden, though the head of our family occupies an area close to Loch-Lomand.


Recorded in many spellings, this is a surname of either Germanic and Anglo-Saxon pre 7th century origins, or it is from the Gaelic (Irish). If Anglo-Saxon it is locational and originates from the place called Roddam, in the English county of Northumberland, and near to the town of Alnwick, or from living near a rodum, meaning a clearing in a forest. The placename is recorded in the Curia Regis rolls of the year 1201 as Rodun, and later in 1236 as Rodum, so much for early spelling. The derivation is from the 7th century word "rod", meaning a clearing, and 'ham', a place or house. Early examples of the surname development in Northumberland region include the recordings of Margaret Roaddam in 1603, Margery Rodhenn in 1609, John Rodam in 1623, and Edward Roodom in 1626, whilst Ann Rodan is recorded in London in 1680. If Irish the origination is from O'Rodain, meaning the descendant of the son of the lively one! The modern surname can be found as Roddam, Roddan, Roden, and Rodden, which can be English or Irish, and O'Rodane, O'Rudden and Reddin, which are Irish. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William de Roddam, which was dated 1296, in the "Northumberland Hundred Rolls", during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307.

OneWolf
Wednesday, May 5th, 2010, 08:59 AM
My Grandmothers name was Lewis.They where from the Isle of Skye.
I believe they are from the Clan Stewart.

Ægir
Monday, August 2nd, 2010, 11:44 PM
My Grandmothers name was Lewis.They where from the Isle of Skye.
I believe they are from the Clan Stewart.
They are part of the Clan MacLeod of Lewis…Although some Lewis families are listed as Stewart the location of your family would indicate MacLeod as Skye was mainly Clan Donald and Clan MacLeod land…other Lewis families live in Wales…

Ægir
Monday, August 2nd, 2010, 11:45 PM
As for me...Clan MacIain of Ardnamurchan...an old branch of the mighty Clan Donald

Barreldriver
Tuesday, August 3rd, 2010, 01:25 AM
I personally do not have membership to a clan, but I descend from members of the Elphinstone clan.

Pictus
Saturday, August 7th, 2010, 09:57 PM
I do not know if it is a clan but Barder is the Scottish surname my forefathers beared, it seems to have some connection to the Dodds family/clan.

Esther_Helena
Sunday, August 8th, 2010, 02:03 AM
Everything I look up says anyone with a particular surname is a member of that clan. So, going by that and the last names of my ancestors:

Fergusson, Gordon, Campbell, MacIntyre, and maybe a few others if I go back far enough.

As far as being a 'card carrying' member of a clan with meetings and whatnot, none. I did get invited to the local Clan Gordon Society, but it's not local enough for me to actually join. - The furthest I can really trace that line back to is to the immigrant John George Gordon.

Frostfire
Friday, August 13th, 2010, 11:31 AM
Very proud to be a Matheson... motto: In Fac Et Spera (Do and hope).

Reshki
Friday, August 13th, 2010, 04:52 PM
"Official member" none.

But I come from the Deuchar sept of Clan Lindsay.

Soljah
Sunday, August 15th, 2010, 02:22 AM
well my grandfathers last name is McDonald. That should give a clue.

Thorolf
Friday, August 27th, 2010, 01:52 PM
Im descended from the lockhart clan. My great grandmothers family is scot/irish ancestry and lockhart was a name passed through in her family. From what ive been told from that side of the family, that was the clan we were from.

Thorwolf
Monday, August 30th, 2010, 04:44 PM
I am a decendant of three diferent scotish clans,

My last name is Lingo, we are a sept. of the clan Grahm.
on my mothers side we are MacLean from the island of Mull, and Keith from north east Pict land

We are direct decendants of every Scotish King all the way to the 1300's Robert De Bruce's sister Cristina De Bruce is one of my grandmothers

interestingly enough when you trace back Malcom Canmore, it goes all the way to the original kings of Ireland

QueenBodicca
Thursday, September 2nd, 2010, 06:02 PM
I am a Livingstone, of the Sept of the Appin Stuarts.

We (the kids) are told we are related to Donald Livingston (many of the males in my family were named for him in some way shape or form) who fought on the side of the Appin Stuarts at Culloden, and saved the Stuart flag from capture by the Anglish.

Oh, by the way...many clans are now doing DNA checks...to confirm membership in clans.

After the European Jews confirmed that they are actually descended from ancient Semites (75% of their genetic material is Semitic) genetically related to other Jews (and ironically "White" Jews are more closely related to Palestinian Arabs than the Turks, Slavs or Rus, only 25% of their genetic make up is Eastern European)...the Scot clans started using DNA testing also.

Plantagenet
Thursday, September 9th, 2010, 08:18 PM
My last name is an Anglicized version of the Scottish name Kerr, and my ancestors are rumored to be from Scotland way back before settling in Northern England and then settling in New Jersey, so the clan I would be a part of is none other than the Kerr clan. Apparently their motto is Sero Sed Serio, which is Latin for "Late, but in Earnest." in reference to the Scottish victory over the English at Battle of Ancrum Moor in which the Kerrs must have played a pivotal role.

What is interesting is that according to the Family Tree DNA project, the Carr clan from which I descend has the YDNA genetic marker of R1b1b2a1b5, which according to Eupedia has its highest percentage in Sweden and Scotland, and that the most prevalent ancient group is Germanic. Makes sense since Carr/Kerr and its varieties apparently comes from the Norse, "Kjarr" meaning from the marshland or something or another.

Blaph
Wednesday, October 27th, 2010, 02:09 PM
I'm having a hell of a time finding out. My father's surname was Walker, and from what little I've gleaned as to my parentage, he goes right back to the old country.

What clan this makes me a member of remains a mystery for now.

Astrid Runa
Thursday, October 28th, 2010, 12:49 PM
My clan is the Young clan, and our Motto is "Robere Prudentia Praestat" (Prudence Excells Strength)

Fyrgenholt
Friday, October 29th, 2010, 11:19 PM
In my family tree I have a MacGuire and a Marr. The MacGuires are, apparently, of the MacGuaidhre clan whose chiefs had their seats in the Ulva. Guaire (Guaidhre?) was the brother of Fingon, the progenitor of the MacKinnon clan. The Marrs are, apparently, of the Gôrdan clan.

I don't know how viable this information is though, and, although I aknowledge all of my (known) ancestry, my Scottish heritage is distant and is of little significance to my self perception.

theTasmanian
Saturday, October 30th, 2010, 10:10 AM
My mothers side Hutcheson are part of Clan McDonald

Magni
Friday, November 5th, 2010, 09:35 AM
None. I am from Irish clan O DubhGhaill. I just wanted to get in on the sharing. :D


The clans origins are Germanic though.

Fyrgenholt
Saturday, November 6th, 2010, 10:27 AM
The clans origins are Germanic though.

How so?

Juthunge
Saturday, November 6th, 2010, 02:03 PM
How so?

"Of course, the Doyles and O’Doyles are also prominent in and around other Viking settlements in Ireland such as Dublin, Waterford, Cork, Limerick, Galway, and Donegal.

The Doyle's are descendants of the Vikings, who settled along the seacoast in pre-Norman times; and in fact the Doyle's are and where always more numerous in areas adjacent to the sea coast, which tends to confirm this view. DubhGall, it may be mentioned, is the word used in early times to denote a Norseman or a Scandinavian. One authority, however, Rev. John Francis Shearman, asserts that the eponymous ancestor of the east Leinster Doyles was DubhGilla (a Norseman), son of Bruadar, King of Idrone (county Carlow), in the year 851.

As DubhGhaill the name appears in the "Annals of the Four Masters" at various dates between 978 and 1013. However, it does not appear in works concerned with Irish Genealogy, since the founder of the family is thought to be descended from a Norseman who came to Ireland raiding and then settled, before the Anglo-Norman invasions."

Source: http://www.doyle.com.au/ancient.htm

Magni
Saturday, November 6th, 2010, 08:50 PM
Yeah, my ancestors were Danish vikings who raided the coast of the British Isles and eventually settled. Of course they married into the local population eventually which is why I am Irish on my fathers side. My clan has Scottish connections as well too though.

"The McDowell family in Ireland are our “cousins”, and are descended from the Danish Vikings who settled in Argyll and the Western Islands of Scotland. Their great ancestor was Somerled (a Viking word meaning “summer warrior”) , he was the master of Argyll (on the west coast of Scotland) and he was killed in battle against the Scots in 1164. (Argyll and the Western Isles were not ceeded to Scotland by the King of Norway until 1266.) A branch of this family settled in Ireland in the 1240’s. Initially they served as “galloglass” (professional mercenary soldiers) for the O’Conor Clans in the Province of Connacht. For the next 300 years or so, the McDowells are recorded in various ancient Irish records as professional soldiers, serving a number of different Irish Warlords in various parts of Ireland."




I think that there is probably a lot of Germanic blood in Ireland.

Caledonian
Sunday, November 7th, 2010, 08:13 AM
Lennox clan supposedly.

My family's Scottish surname was Fern before it adopted a more German one through transcultural marriages overtime where the Scottish one disappeared over a period of time.

Fyrgenholt
Sunday, November 7th, 2010, 11:22 PM
Magni, Juthunge - I understand. I thought in saying the clans origins are Germanic you meant that the clan system is Germanic in origin rather than that the proginators of a particular clan are. Maybe I misread you ;)

Magni
Sunday, November 7th, 2010, 11:56 PM
Ah, I see. Sorry for the confusion.

M. Krause
Monday, November 8th, 2010, 03:35 PM
Sutherland, Guthrie, MacRae, MacGregor, Sinclair, MacDonald of Glencoe

Thorwolf
Monday, November 8th, 2010, 03:55 PM
Yeah, my ancestors were Danish vikings who raided the coast of the British Isles and eventually settled. Of course they married into the local population eventually which is why I am Irish on my fathers side. My clan has Scottish connections as well too though.

"The McDowell family in Ireland are our “cousins”, and are descended from the Danish Vikings who settled in Argyll and the Western Islands of Scotland. Their great ancestor was Somerled (a Viking word meaning “summer warrior”) , he was the master of Argyll (on the west coast of Scotland) and he was killed in battle against the Scots in 1164. (Argyll and the Western Isles were not ceeded to Scotland by the King of Norway until 1266.) A branch of this family settled in Ireland in the 1240’s. Initially they served as “galloglass” (professional mercenary soldiers) for the O’Conor Clans in the Province of Connacht. For the next 300 years or so, the McDowells are recorded in various ancient Irish records as professional soldiers, serving a number of different Irish Warlords in various parts of Ireland."




I think that there is probably a lot of Germanic blood in Ireland.


I am also a decendant of Sommerled Lord of Argyll! And yes, There is deffinately alot of germanic blood in the Isles. Many Scottish clans are direct decendants of Vikings.

Ljót-fulfr
Tuesday, November 9th, 2010, 02:39 AM
I am a MacLeod of Harris, aka: The Siol Thormoid - or the seed of Tormod or Norman. Thormoid / Tormod was the eldest son of my direct ancestor Leod or Ljot - who was of Royal Norse Viking descent, descended from the Norse Kings of Man and the Isles.

The greater part of my ancestry is Highland Scot, so there are many other clans in my recent ancestry I could bore you all with.

Recent 'Y' DNA studies have confirmed a Viking origin for the Clan MacLeod in Western Norway. Legend says we were "mighty Vikings from the town of Bergen" This was despite initial skepticism from proponants of the idea that all R1b haplogroup was "Celtic". Our particular haplotype defined by the L-165 marker defines our grouping as a Viking one. All confirmed within the last year or so.

These people were known as the Gall-Gaels or Norse-Gaels. My great grandfather Norman was the last to speak the Gaelic in my direct line, along w/ his siblings.

ArcticWarrior
Monday, December 6th, 2010, 11:08 PM
I am descend from Clan Boyd. Boyd is my surname. I'll be visiting Dean Castle in Kilmarnock, which the Clan owned, when I go to Scotland next summer.

Caledonian
Tuesday, December 7th, 2010, 04:14 AM
I am descend from Clan Boyd. Boyd is my surname. I'll be visiting Dean Castle in Kilmarnock, which the Clan owned, when I go to Scotland next summer.

I envy you. :P

[It's one of my dreams to go there someday.]

TheVinson
Monday, December 27th, 2010, 02:06 AM
I am also a decendant of Sommerled Lord of Argyll! And yes, There is deffinately alot of germanic blood in the Isles. Many Scottish clans are direct decendants of Vikings.

I think my great-great-great.....etc grandfather killed your great-great.....well you get the idea, maybe, don't quote me on that.

From my mother's side I am descended of the great Clan Campbell! Our founder Colin the Great came from Ireland in the 1100's and settled in Argyll near Inverary.

Hrafnkell
Thursday, December 30th, 2010, 04:37 PM
I am descended from Clan Gregor, and at some point there is a dash of Clan Gunn.

D. H. Yeager
Thursday, December 30th, 2010, 06:19 PM
My mother's side is is Clark. The Clark family itself was never really a clan but is regarded as a sept (sub-branch) of both Cameron and Macpherson.

Here is the family Tartan, "Blue Clergy":

http://www.lindaclifford.com/Images/Clark.jpg

alfmashold
Friday, December 31st, 2010, 11:09 PM
I am a descendant of clan Borland which is an affiliate of the Boyd clan. I have read that there is a Borland tartan but I have not been able to locate it.

Caledonian
Saturday, January 1st, 2011, 01:14 AM
Doing some research on the Lennox clan I came upon these images:

http://www.loch-lomond.net/images/clans/lennox.jpg

http://www.loch-lomond.net/images/clans/lennoxlogo.jpg


The Clan History

The Celtic earls of Lennox commanded the Vale of Leven between the 12th and 15th centuries. The name Lennox comes from the Gaelic name for that place. Sir John Stewart of Darnley (d.1495) was created 1st Earl of Lennox of the new line by King James III in 1473, and Henry Stuart (1545-67), Lord Darnley, eldest son of the 4th Earl of Lennox, was the second husband of Mary, Queen of Scots, and father of King James VI, who promoted the 8th Earl to be Duke of Lennox in 1581.

LENNOX: Of local origin from the ancient earldom of that name which comprised most of Dunbartonshire and parts of western Stirlingshire. The 1st Earl of Lennox is thought to have been a 4th generation descendant of Ecgfrith of Northumbria whose son Arkil came north to the court of Malcolm III in the late 11th century. Arkil's grand-daughter married into the native Celtic stock and their son became the 1st Earl. The family were adherents of Bruce in his fight for independence and appear in many charters of the period. Duncan, 8th Earl, whose daughter married the Regent Albany, Governor of Scotland during James I's captivity, suffered the same fate as his son-in-law and grandsons on the 'heading hill' of Stirling in 1425. The Lennox lands were left with Albany's widow, as his nearest heir, and the king's hatred of the Albanys extended to the widow who spent the rest of her life in virtual exile on an island in Loch Lomond. On her death the titles were contested among the off-spring of her two sisters, with the final outcome that they passed to a descendant of the younger who had married into the Stewarts of Darnley. Thenceforth, the Earldom of Lennox and Lordship of Darnley were held conjointly by the Stewarts, and with the marriage of the 4th Earl to the daughter of the Dowager Queen Margaret Tudor and the Earl of Angus and the elder son of this union being Henry, styled Lord Darnley, consort of Mary Queen of Scots the Lennox line reached its zenith when their son became James VI of Scotland and I of England. The present Lennox tartan is said to derive from a portrait (now lost) of this 4th Earl's wife. The honours of Lennox were elevated to a dukedom in 1581, but on the death of the 6th Duke they reverted to Charles II, who later bestowed them on a 'natural' son. In this time evidence of the surname is established for it appears in the earliest Register of Lyon Court where arms were granted to John Lennox of Woodhead. The name is found in Campsie, a few miles to the north of Glasgow, where the families of Woodhead, Branshogle, Balglas and Antermony had their residences

TARTAN: Lennox (Clan and District).

Motto: Avant Darnlie (French : Darnly to the fore); En la rose je fleuris (French : I flourish in the rose); Bydand (Steadfast)
Names associated with the clan: LEVENAX LEVINAX LEVYNNAX MACCORC MACGURKICH MACGURGH MACGURK MACKORK LENOX LENNOX MACCORK

http://www.rowandisplays.com/acatalog/Lennox-Scottish-Clan.html

Barreldriver
Saturday, January 1st, 2011, 03:04 AM
History of Clan Elphinstone (I descend from them via a line in my grandmother's paternal family, my 11x great grandmother was an Anne Elphinstone married to Robert Lockhart of Lanarkshire, Anne is the daughter of Alexander Elphinstone and Lillias, then Alexander's line goes back to the John Elphinstone mentioned in the wiki article below, I also descend from the Alexander Elphinstone d. 1513 who fought for James IV through this line, the byname Alexander was used repeatedly among my Elphinstone ancestors after the death of the Alexander who died at Flodden Field):


Origins of the Name

The Clan Elphinstone is believed to have originated from Airth in Stirlingshire. The surname Elphinstone derives from the territory of Elphinstone in the parish of Tranent, East Lothian. The original name is thought to have been 'de Erth', which later became 'Elfinstun', and finally 'Elphinstone'. The de Erths inherited lands near Tranent through marriage and built a castle there. Deeds dating from 1235 bear the name ‘de Elfinstun’, and grants dating from 1250 record the name John de Elphinstone as a witness. Sir John Elfinstun married Margaret Seton of Clan Seton, the niece of King Robert I of Scotland[citation needed].

Some people believe that John de Elphinstone was previously named John de Swinton of Clan Swinton. Supporters of this theory claim that Clan Elphinstone, in common with many Borders clans, was founded from the Swinton Family[citation needed].

15th Century

A descendant, William Elfinstun, became rector of Kirkmichael at the age of twenty-five. He studied Civil and Canon Law in Paris, eventually becoming Professor of Law in that university. In 1484 he was appointed Bishop of Aberdeen and later Lord Chancellor of Scotland, a post he held until the death of King James III of Scotland in June of 1489. In 1494 he was given a papal bull from Pope Alexander VI to found the University of Aberdeen. He died in 1514.
[edit] 16th Century & Anglo Scottish Wars

In 1513 during the Anglo-Scottish Wars, a cousin of William Elfinstun, Sir Alexander Elphinstone, led the Clan Elphinstone at the Battle of Flodden Field. Sir Alexander was slain in the battle, fighting in support of King James IV of Scotland

Alexander's son, also called Alexander, took over as chief and led the Clan Elphinstone at the Battle of Pinkie Cleugh in 1547, where he was killed. The fourth Lord Elphinstone was appointed in 1599 as a judge of the Supreme Court of Scotland in 1599 and later Lord high Treasurer[citation needed].
[edit] 18th to 19th Centuries & the Napoleonic Wars

The eleventh Lord Eliphinstone was lieutenant governor of Edinburgh Castle. His younger brother, George Keith Elphinstone, was a successful and distinguished naval commander. The squadron of ships he served on was used to protect British shipping interests off the eastern coast of America. In 1795 he was made vice-admiral and commanded the fleet that captured the Cape of Good Hope, compelling the Dutch fleet to surrender without a shot being fired. Elphinstone was rewarded for this victory with an Irish barony. He was later promoted to the rank of admiral, and created Baron Keith of Banheath. In 1814 he was raised to the rank of Viscount. William George Elphinstone, the Viscount's nephew, was a colonel who fought against the French at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 during the Napoleonic Wars.

ArcticWarrior
Sunday, January 2nd, 2011, 07:15 AM
The Boyd Clan tartan is quite sharp, if you ask me. I really like it.

http://www.scottish-wedding-dreams.com/images/boyd-clan-wr1819r.gif

Shine
Wednesday, January 5th, 2011, 04:45 PM
Colquhoun Clan


http://www.rampantscotland.com/clans/graphics/colquhouncrest7a.jpg

This name comes from the Gaelic place name "cuil cumhann" meaning "narrow corner". The location of Colquhoun (pronounced "ca-hoon" with the accent on the second syllable) is on the western shores of Loch Lomond. Umfphredus de Kilpatrick was granted the lands by the Earl of Lennox in the 13th century, during the reign of King Alexander II. He adopted the surname from the name of the area. Initially, he lived at Dunglas castle, which was not far from the royal Dumbarton Castle. Later, the Colquhouns became the keepers of that castle.
The chiefs obtained lands at Luss (the village is pictured here) through marriage in the 14th century. In the 15th century, Sir John Colquhoun became Comptroller of the Royal Household and expanded the estates to include the forests of Rossdhu and Glenmachome, plus the estates of Kilmardinny. Sir John was one of those who negotiated at the court of King Edward IV of England, trying to arrange the marriage of the young King James IV and Edward's daughter. While this was not successful, it was the later marriage of James IV to Margaret Tudor which led eventually to the Union of the Crowns in 1603.

In the 16th century, a Colquhoun emigrated to Sweden and began a cannon making factory. Names such as Cahun, Caun, Gahn and Kharun can still be found in Sweden.
The Colquhouns were attacked by the Highland clans on a number of occasions. In 1602, following a raid on his property by the MacGregors, Alexander Colquhoun of Luss was given a royal commission to pursue the clan. In 1603, Alasdair MacGregor of Glenstrae led around 400 men from Loch Long into the head of Glen Fruin. The chief of the Colquhouns, with 500 men and 300 horse, advanced up the glen to meet the attack. The MacGregors split their forces into two and while one half began the battle, the other half swung through the hills and attacked the Colquhouns from the rear. They were driven into a peat bog (where their cavalry were useless) and suffered heavy losses. It was following this incident that the MacGregor name was proscribed (banned). It was not until the end of the 18th century that the chiefs of the two clans brought their enmity to an end by shaking hands on the site of the battle in Glen Fruin.

The 11th Laird of Luss was made a Baronet of Nova Scotia in 1625. But a few years later he was accused of seducing his wife's sister by means of witchcraft and became a fugitive. The estates were forfeited but recovered by his son.

The 5th Baronet of Luss was a member of the Scottish Parliament at the time of the Act of Union and vigorously opposed it.

Through marriage, James Grant of Pluscardine succeeded to the estates. His fourth son, Sir James Grant Colquhoun, succeeded to the estates and built a mansion at Rossdhu which was the seat of the chiefs until recently. The crest shown here is from the gates at the former enrance to the estate.

In the USA the name is often found as Calhoun (there was a vice-president of the USA of that name). Cohen is another form of the name.

A Colquhoun clan centre has been opened in Luss, on the banks of Loch Lomond.

The Colquhoun clan motto is "Si je puis" which means "If I can".

Surnames regarded as septs (sub-branch) of the Colquhoun clan include Cowan, Ingram, King, MacCowan and MacManus.

http://www.rampantscotland.com/clans/blclancolquhoun.htm

flâneur
Wednesday, January 12th, 2011, 07:02 AM
From what i can tell i am from the clan "Sassanach".....not the oldest clan known to the Scots but probably the fiercest and most powerfull.
Our clannish ways still govern most of Scotland and the Scots still speak our Sassanach language.......:D

Our clan tartan is a white background with white linen crosses woven into it.



Sassenach is a word used chiefly by the Scots to designate an Englishman. It derives from the Scottish Gaelic Sasunnach meaning, originally, "Saxon", from the Latin "Saxones"; it was also formerly applied by Highlanders to (non-Gaelic-speaking) Lowlanders.As employed by Scots or Scottish English-speakers today it is usually used in jest, as a (friendly) term of abuse. The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) gives 1771 as the date of the earliest written use of the word in English.

Sasanach, the Irish-language word for an Englishman, has the same derivation, as do the words used in Welsh to describe the English people (Saeson, sing. Sais) and the language and things English in general: Saesneg and Seisnig. These words are normally, however, used only in the Irish and Welsh languages themselves.

Cornish also terms English Sawsnek from the same derivation. Some Cornish were known to use the expression 'Meea navidna cowza sawzneck!' to feign ignorance of the English language

Magni
Wednesday, January 12th, 2011, 09:16 AM
Here is mine for O'Dubh Ghaill.

Hope I am not too off base posting an Irish clan here, specially since it has Germanic and Scottish roots.


Tartan

Green for its Irishness
Red for the warlike Danish Vikings
Gold for glory and wealth

http://img97.imageshack.us/img97/825/dubhghaill.jpg (http://img97.imageshack.us/i/dubhghaill.jpg/)

Badge

http://img10.imageshack.us/img10/7610/dubhghaillbadge.gif (http://img10.imageshack.us/i/dubhghaillbadge.gif/)

prodeutsch
Monday, January 17th, 2011, 11:41 AM
GUNN Clan here.

boltofnite
Sunday, January 23rd, 2011, 05:39 AM
Kincaid, which I believe is a lowland clan.

Hammish
Sunday, January 23rd, 2011, 06:31 PM
From what i can tell i am from the clan "Sassanach".....not the oldest clan known to the Scots but probably the fiercest and most powerfull.
Our clannish ways still govern most of Scotland and the Scots still speak our Sassanach language.......:D



Funny... and I am in that same clan.

I have a my Scottish genealogy going back many generations, including both direct and indirect lines, and you know what?

A pretty even mix of people with both highland names (mainly West highland) and lowland names (all Anglo Saxon) marrying each other. So, Saxon works for me...

Add to that the Scots/Irish (Ulster Scots) contribution from my paternal side and you get a pretty solid Anglo Saxon majority all from within the borders of what we call Scotland (or Northern Ireland).

Hammish

dgirlc
Monday, April 18th, 2011, 05:34 PM
I'm such a newb, is there a technical way to become a member of a clan? My mothers maiden name is Scott, and her mothers maiden name is Stuart, we are related to Mary Queen of Scotland.

Thorolf
Friday, April 22nd, 2011, 11:45 PM
My mom was talking to the family again and found out we are descended from the Macneils. I did some research and they seems interesting.

Melisande
Sunday, April 24th, 2011, 12:34 AM
Several, if I go back far enough (MacRory, MacAlpin, MacDuff).

But the clan that my grandmother, who was the real Scot in my life, was MacKenzie - and we had best remember that, according to her. However, also according to her, none of us were entitled to claim any tartan, unless we kept her name. This my father actually considered doing - and oddly, her husband also considered changing his name (but she wouldn't allow it - and he eventually chose another Scottish name for himself, though his name was French). My father was very close to his mother's brother, a MacKenzie who was truly entitled to the tartan.

I've thought about adding her name to mine (legally), to adhere to the rules of clan membership, because I do have a piece of MacKenzie tartan that I wear - although thousands of other non-MacKenzies also wear it, it's a beautiful and common pattern.

Cuchulainn
Sunday, April 24th, 2011, 02:38 AM
From Ferguson, although sadly a great-great-great-grandfather who was angry at his father changed the spelling to Furgerson... non too pleased when I learned that

Esther_Helena
Sunday, April 24th, 2011, 01:22 PM
For the interested: http://www.scottishtartans.org/
The Scottish Tartan Museum is located in Franklin, NC. I went there last year for the Scottish Heritage Festival. I wasn't all that impressed to be honest, but at the same time I'm glad I went. It just doesn't seem to be the kind of thing one would go to every year.
Also listening to bagpipes while having an ear infection is not fun. :thumbdown

I got a woolen scarf and pewter badge. Note to self: wool is itchy.

I know to be a member of a clan, all I have to do is have ancestry from that surname. What I'm not entirely clear on is adoption. My surname is Scottish in origin and I can trace my ancestors of that line to around the Revolutionary War. It's just that my father's father was adopted and so I have no real blood ties to my surname. I've heard that anyone who bears a particular surname is automatically a member of that clan, but at the same time with DNA testing, if my father or grandfather were to test their results would be invalid as they (we) are not genetically of that surname.

Feverfew
Wednesday, June 1st, 2011, 08:21 PM
Several that I know of.

Dalziel - Means 'White Meadow', named after the colour of the local soil. The clan coat of arms features a hanged man, which is believed to be inspired by an event from the time of King Kenneth II. A member of the court went into enemy territory to retrieve the body of a friend of the King. This event also inspired the clan motto 'I dare'. From Lanark and Dumfriesshire.

Hamilton - The family is descended from Walter fitz Gilbert of Cadzow, an Scoto-Norman comrade of Robert the Bruce, and rose in power to be the leading noble family in Scotland, second only to the royal House of Stewart, to whom they were closely related.

Maxwell - The name Maxwell originates from Maccus, a Norman lord and son of Undweyn, who gave his name to Maccuswell, a pool of the river Tweed near Kelso bridge. A grandson of Maccus, John Maxwell, became chamberlain of Scotland before dying in 1241, to be succeeded by his brother Aylmer. From Aylmer sprang many branches of the family throughout the south-west of Scotland.

MacInnes - Clan MacInnes' ancestors were among the early inhabitants of Islay, Jura and the Kintyre peninsula in Scotland, generally part of the region known as Argyll. These Scotti, a Celtic, Gaelic-speaking people, first appear there as settlers from Ireland in c. 500 when Fergus Mór, king of the north Irish kingdom of Dál Riata, and his two brothers, Loarn and Óengus, expanded their lands into southwestern Alba.

Goomer
Monday, June 6th, 2011, 12:51 PM
Wish I knew. Two Scottish surnames I know of in the family are Ely and Stuart.....or is it Stewart?? Er....one of the two lol

Feverfew
Monday, June 6th, 2011, 01:17 PM
http://www.scotclans.com/scottish_clans/clan_stuart_of_bute/index.html



I've never heard of Ely as a Scottish surname. There is a Cambridgeshire town called Ely, which is not so far from where I was born. Very interesting part of the world.
http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Ely

TheVinson
Monday, June 6th, 2011, 01:27 PM
Wish I knew. Two Scottish surnames I know of in the family are Ely and Stuart.....or is it Stewart?? Er....one of the two lol

I believe Stuart is correct and Stewart is the Anglicized form, or that Stuart is a surname and Stewart is a first name. But I could be wrong.

Goomer
Monday, June 6th, 2011, 01:48 PM
http://www.scotclans.com/scottish_clans/clan_stuart_of_bute/index.html

I've never heard of Ely as a Scottish surname. There is a Cambridgeshire town called Ely, which is not so far from where I was born. Very interesting part of the world.
http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Ely

It makes sense that it would be Scottish because I have a good friend with the last name of Neely....and her name is Scottish. It just sounds Scottish. But, I also know how intermingled many of the surnames are in the British Isles. Sometimes I cannot tell if the name is Irish or Scottish. On the other hand, Welsh surnames, I've been told, often are first names also.

But, I am an American, so I have no real way of knowing for sure lol.

Feverfew
Monday, June 6th, 2011, 02:20 PM
It makes sense that it would be Scottish because I have a good friend with the last name of Neely....and her name is Scottish. It just sounds Scottish. But, I also know how intermingled many of the surnames are in the British Isles. Sometimes I cannot tell if the name is Irish or Scottish. On the other hand, Welsh surnames, I've been told, often are first names also.

But, I am an American, so I have no real way of knowing for sure lol.

Well, names from Scotland and Ireland have had a habit of losing their Mc Mac and O' over the centuries, and also had a lot of variations in spelling. Neely is an example of a name that has lost its Mac, I think its a gaelic name.

One site I used when doing my family tree was http://worldnames.publicprofiler.org

It shows where surnames are concentrated around the world, which can give you an idea of where it may have originally come from.
Just click on the country that is coloured blue and it will show you a map of counties/states of that country and where it is most common.

Dun Holm
Monday, June 6th, 2011, 07:11 PM
Clan Wallace

Helikaon
Thursday, June 9th, 2011, 02:48 AM
My heritage goes back to Clan Donnachaidh (Robertson).
Despite living in the U.S., I never miss a kirkin' o' the tartan.

What are some good sources for Scottish History?
Most sources I've found seemed a bit brief.

Angus
Thursday, June 9th, 2011, 03:46 AM
My heritage goes back to Clan Donnachaidh (Robertson).
Despite living in the U.S., I never miss a kirkin' o' the tartan.

What are some good sources for Scottish History?
Most sources I've found seemed a bit brief.

Try here:
http://www.scotclans.com/

If that doesn't help, let me know :thumbup

Sinklars_Visa
Sunday, July 3rd, 2011, 04:39 PM
I'm an Anderson
http://www.coats-of-arms.com/Anderson_Clan_Crest.jpg

Naglfari
Wednesday, July 6th, 2011, 11:40 PM
Most of my Scottish ancestors went to Ulster first. They are mainly septs of the following clans:
Stewart
Cameron
Campbell