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View Full Version : Who Was the Greatest Viking Warrior/King ?



Nordlander
Tuesday, September 29th, 2009, 04:19 AM
Who do you think was the greatest Viking Warrior /King and why? Haraldr Hardrada,King Knut ,Rollo,King Saint Olaf,Harold Godwinson,William the Conqueror,Erik the red ,Leif Eriksson or the lone Axeman that held off Harolds army at Stamford Bridge. It could be for his leadership , bravery or exploration, or his mark on History and the origins of our people.

Frozen_Thunder
Tuesday, September 29th, 2009, 08:32 AM
I am very glad to see you pointing out the lone warrior that held the bridge, I have always found that to be the most heroic feat in plain history and it is great others know about it

uppvaknad
Tuesday, September 29th, 2009, 10:21 AM
Since it is hard to know exactly what each king did and the circumstances it is impossible to tell. However most of them had more balls then the decadent liberals of today.

SpearBrave
Tuesday, September 29th, 2009, 11:09 AM
Erik Bloodaxe or Rollo ?
I really like the the early viking era with no kings just small self governing groups.

Nordlander
Tuesday, September 29th, 2009, 01:10 PM
I am very glad to see you pointing out the lone warrior that held the bridge, I have always found that to be the most heroic feat in plain history and it is great others know about it

Most accounts of the Stamford bridge battle say the lone axeman killed upwards of 40 men and was only vanquished by one of Harolds men swimming under the bridge and killing him wih a spear upwards under the bridge.


Erik Bloodaxe or Rollo ?
I really like the the early viking era with no kings just small self governing groups.

Excellent picks! not as much has been recorded of the pre -christian Vikings but their feats were magnificent.I have always loved the stories of the great Swedish Viking Ingvar (far -traveller) who made it to the Caspian sea by sailing down the Volga .Oleg who founded Kiev (present day)Ukraine ,Russia.Most Northern Prussians can trace their roots here (Ingvar) or to Styrbjörn Starke the leader of the Jomsburg Vikings who settled there from Sweden (Today)

Berserkergang
Saturday, October 10th, 2009, 04:50 PM
Most accounts of the Stamford bridge battle say the lone axeman killed upwards of 40 men and was only vanquished by one of Harolds men swimming under the bridge and killing him wih a spear upwards under the bridge.

That incredible man must have been a Berserker.

Méldmir
Saturday, October 10th, 2009, 04:59 PM
Who do you count as Viking here? Harold Godwinson was an Anglo-Saxon I mean. I would say Viking = Norse during period 700-1100. William would be sort of a half-viking :)

Bradford
Saturday, October 10th, 2009, 05:02 PM
That incredible man must have been a Berserker.

I remember the translator of the copy I read added a note that Harald was probably the lone fighter on the bridge and it could've been a mistranslation.

Hersir
Saturday, October 10th, 2009, 05:03 PM
Who do you count as Viking here? Harold Godwinson was an Anglo-Saxon I mean. I would say Viking = Norse during period 700-1100. William would be sort of a half-viking :)

His mother was scandinavian. Im sure there were vikings who came from anglo-saxon/norse mixing

Ocko
Saturday, October 10th, 2009, 05:04 PM
I don't know too much about the accomplishments of viking kings. Most of them couldn't do their stuff without the common viking warriors.

It seems to me that the courage, prowess and determination of the common warrior and their immediate leaders is what the viking age made so great of a time. It is like to honor the 'unknown soldier' in ourdays time. I would reward the honor too to the unknown viking going into foreign lands and die there in battle men to men.

This is the one who goes to Valhall. Their deeds and feats are known to today and we should tell their stories and keep their glory alive.

Good threat.

Méldmir
Saturday, October 10th, 2009, 05:06 PM
His mother was scandinavian. Im sure there were vikings who came from anglo-saxon/norse mixing

Yes, but it makes it confusing since Viking isn't an ethnicity. Norse around the period I mentioned would be better, since that is what people often mean when they say Viking.

Bradford
Saturday, October 10th, 2009, 05:10 PM
Harold the Saxon is how he's known. So no, lol, he wasn't a Viking.

I wouldn't compare the Anglo-Saxons to the Vikings at all, outside of them both being particularly Germanic.

Méldmir
Saturday, October 10th, 2009, 05:12 PM
Harold the Saxon is how he's known. So no, lol, he wasn't a Viking.

I wouldn't compare the Anglo-Saxons to the Vikings at all, outside of them both being particularly Germanic.

I am curious, why wouldn't you do that? Aside from the religion I mean, since the Annglo-Saxons became Christians some hundred years before the Norse.

Bradford
Saturday, October 10th, 2009, 05:19 PM
I am curious, why wouldn't you do that? Aside from the religion I mean, since the Annglo-Saxons became Christians some hundred years before the Norse.

Right, Anglo-Saxons were Christianized only a bit after settling in England, I mean they were sort of like Vikings BEFORE that, but after they took to the heptarchy, they became, figuratively speaking, sedentary. They then just focused on their insular Kingdoms, eventually uniting (through whatever means), and becoming a power in the region, rather than a group of raiders.

Vikings aren't very similar at all, obviously.

I'd compare to the Irish, at that time to the Vikings before I'd compare the more civil Anglo-Saxon to them.

Nordlander
Saturday, October 10th, 2009, 05:39 PM
That incredible man must have been a Berserker.

Yes that lone axeman on Stamford bridge was a warrior!,and I am proud to say that mans blood runs trough our veins,and his spirit is in our hearts

Méldmir
Saturday, October 10th, 2009, 05:43 PM
Right, Anglo-Saxons were Christianized only a bit after settling in England, I mean they were sort of like Vikings BEFORE that, but after they took to the heptarchy, they became, figuratively speaking, sedentary. They then just focused on their insular Kingdoms, eventually uniting (through whatever means), and becoming a power in the region, rather than a group of raiders.

Vikings aren't very similar at all, obviously.

I'd compare to the Irish, at that time to the Vikings before I'd compare the more civil Anglo-Saxon to them.

You're comparing them from a more political perspective, which I don't think should be the main thing when looking a similarities between peoples- The Anglo-Saxon folk and Norse folk were probably always similar despite political system and religion. And a Norse person could probably without alot of problems assimilate into England. And the Irish spoke an entirerly different language which would make assimilation and such harder. As a side note, heathenism is likely to have survived among some Anglo-Saxons for 200-300 years after coming to England.

I think the above is a reason for the Norse being very succesful and having alot and longlasting influence in England.

Also I would like to say that religion had less importance for the common folk than for the nobility and such. For farmers etc the difference between a Christan and Heathen and that time might have been dim, just look have long folklore have survived, which has its roots in heathen religions.

Magni
Saturday, November 6th, 2010, 06:57 AM
I'll go with Somerled.

Ulfvaldr
Saturday, November 6th, 2010, 07:19 AM
I'm liking the lone Axeman that held off Harolds army at Stamford. I just love hearing story's like that. I wish his name was known. Whats Old Norse for bad a$$? :D

zDrake
Friday, November 19th, 2010, 10:29 PM
Egil Skallagrímsson should be a candidate.

Egil was a skilled skald and a mighty warrior from Iceland. Allegedly he composed his first poem at the age of three and killed his first opponent at the age of seven, believing that the other older boy cheated against him in a game.

He finds himself at odds against Eric Haraldsson and Queen Gunnhildr, both spending a significant amount of time trying to kill Egil, only to have Egil backfire their mischief. This culminated in Egil planting a Nidstang pole in the direction of Eric who could never answer back appropriately as he could never kill Egil.

Thorwolf
Saturday, November 20th, 2010, 02:16 AM
His mother was scandinavian. Im sure there were vikings who came from anglo-saxon/norse mixing

are you talking about William the conquerer? His mother was Harlette De Falise
She was half Scottish, her mother was Doda princess of Scotland.Her father was a french tanner.


As to who I would pick, I am going to have to say my ancesster Sigurd Hlodversson Earl of Orkney. He died in 1014 at the battle of Clontarf in Ireland, his army was deffeated, and in retreat when he drew his sword and charged the standard of Brian Boru, he hacked his way through the lines, and fell 10 feet from the Irish King! This man had balls to spare. The Irish are quite clear about his bravery in their history! Victory or Death.

Thorwolf
Saturday, November 20th, 2010, 02:19 AM
Also, it seems to me that to many have forgotten that the Anglo/Saxons are danish, and german. last time I checked danes were also Vikings. Hengest of Kent was from Jutland.

Saxe
Saturday, November 20th, 2010, 04:22 AM
I'm going with my ancestor Rögnvald the mountain-high. He was a warrior king in Norway, and commissioned the Ynglingatal to commemorate his bloodline.

flâneur
Sunday, November 21st, 2010, 10:58 AM
William the conqueror,aka William the bastard aka William II of Normandy.

Of course im biased.;)

Valknut
Saturday, September 10th, 2011, 01:53 AM
I believe Harold Godwinson's mother was a relative of Styrbjorn the Strong. Heir to the Swedish throne. He was defeated by Erik the Victorious. I am not going out to Wikipedia. I will leave that to any interested.

Halfr
Tuesday, September 13th, 2011, 11:19 AM
Harold the Saxon is how he's known. So no, lol, he wasn't a Viking.

I wouldn't compare the Anglo-Saxons to the Vikings at all, outside of them both being particularly Germanic.

Christian vikings are vikings too in the sources, and a term loosely defined beyond the chronology of the viking era. Though the bias of barbarism usually burdens the pagans. I have no problem imagining a saxon being labeled as a "viking" in the meaning of "pirate", essentially. As saxons, too, were into it, though perhaps not in the institutionalized form as in Scandinavia.

It's not as if norse prose sources make huge distinctions about these things. For instance when the they guess that Jews, like other pagans, worship wooden idols. Somebody who goes "í víking" is merely somebody who ventures out to sea on some martial economic venture.