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Blutwölfin
Friday, September 30th, 2005, 12:42 PM
The Externsteine are a distinctive rock formation located in the Teutoburger Wald region of northwestern Germany. The formation consists of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills.

It has been suggested Externsteine site was a center of religious or cultic activity for the Teutonic peoples and their predecessors, prior to the arrival of Christianity in that part of Europe. This notion can be traced back to Hermann Hamelmann (1564). In 1093 the land surrounding the stones was bought by the Abdinghof monastery of Paderborn, and from that time, traces of human activity, including extensive rock carvings with Christian images were carved on the Externsteine themselves, can be made out by archaeologists. In contrast to the widespread assumption of an early germanic cult site, several excavations didn't produce any archaeological findings earlier than the 11th century, aside some paleolithic and mesolithic stone tools from before about 10,000 BC.

The last Heathen inhabitants of the region were Saxons, up to their defeat and conversion by Charlemagne. Charlemagne is reported to have destroyed the Saxon Irminsul in 722, and Wilhelm Teudt in the 1920s suggested that the location of the Irminsul had been at the Externsteine.

Sigel
Friday, September 30th, 2005, 05:28 PM
Where exactly is it located in Germany?

Blutwölfin
Friday, September 30th, 2005, 05:36 PM
Teutoburger Wald region of northwestern Germany

perkele14
Saturday, October 1st, 2005, 09:52 PM
Isn´t Wevelsburg located nearby there also?

http://www.ssvdhuenn.de/budo/News/Wevelsburg/pics/bIMG_0567.JPG

http://www.wwiirelics.com/Kassel2003/Wevelsburg15.jpg

http://www.derhain.de/SchwarzeSonne3.jpg

(Is it just me or does someone else smell a tourism related business opportunity here..? ;) )

Aeternitas
Sunday, February 25th, 2007, 06:22 AM
Externsteine, a site consisting of five enormous rock pillars in northern Germany, has probably been regarded as sacred since prehistoric times.

An undeniably mysterious and magical place, Externsteine is thought to have been a pagan cultic center until Charlemagne abolished Saxon paganism in 782 AD, and it was used by Christian hermits throughout the Middle Ages.

Externsteine contains a number of astronomical alighnments and fascinating features, and attracts many devotees of Neopaganism and New Age religion.
http://www.sacred-destinations.com/germany/externsteine.htm

94577945799458094581

94582945839458494585

Boche
Sunday, February 25th, 2007, 10:36 AM
Here a Picture collection of all heathenic places with description around the Externsteine in Germany:

1. The "Sonnenwende Altar"
2. Stone Circle in the Valley of Bears (You can see the Algiz Rune attached on one Stone)
3. The Spellbeech
4. + 5. The Cliff Grave - A Symbol of Thors Hammer is engraved on it.
6. The Hole of Stars
7. The Christians have engraved after winning over the German Paganists and Heathens, a Jesus
on the Cross and beside it a destroyed Irminsul (altough Chattians have destroyed it before Christians could touch it -
the place where it once stood can be visited and has an aura of its own)
8. The Cauldron of Reincarnation
9. The Claws (a Wooden formation from an ancient Tree)
10. The Wall of the Mirror
11. An old engraved emblem
12. The view from the Altar during the ''Sonnenwende'' (Solstice)


I hope you have enjoyed and visit it someday. But take care of the hermits and paganists dwelling there. ;)

Bittereinder
Thursday, August 6th, 2009, 10:24 PM
:chinrub

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:


“The Externsteine [ˈɛkstɐnʃtaɪnə] are a distinctive rock formation located in the Teutoburger Wald region of northwestern Germany, not far from the city of Detmold at Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation consists of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. The name probably means "stones of the Egge".


http://forums.skadi.net/photoplog/images/32221/large/1_Externsteine_pano.jpg


The Externsteine relief of the Descent from the Cross. The bent tree below the cross has been suggested to represent the Irminsul, humiliated by the triumph of Christianity.


http://forums.skadi.net/photoplog/images/32221/large/1_180px-Externsteine_Relief.jpg

What was the significance of Externsteine in German history and development, if any? Wikipedia is a little non-descript. I would rather hear Skadi's opinion anyway.

Hersir
Monday, August 10th, 2009, 11:50 PM
There is a long article about Externsteine in KultOrg nr 1 from 2008, if you want to I can scan it and send you. But its in norwegian.
The article has some sources which maybe would interest you.

Bittereinder
Tuesday, August 11th, 2009, 05:51 AM
Thanks Hersir, I would appreciate that if it isn't too much trouble. Maybe it can be added as an attachment to this thread.:)

Bittereinder
Wednesday, September 2nd, 2009, 06:12 AM
Externsteine, a site consisting of five enormous rock pillars in northern Germany, has probably been regarded as sacred since prehistoric times.

An undeniably mysterious and magical place, Externsteine is thought to have been a pagan cultic center until Charlemagne abolished Saxon paganism in 782 AD. It was then used by Christian hermits throughout the Middle Ages.

Externsteine contains a number of astronomical alighnments and other fascinating features, and attracts many devotees of Neopaganism and New Age religion.

History
Little is known about the early history of Externsteine, and its precise origin and significance has baffled generations of scholars. It is relatively clear, at least, that it was an important shrine for Germanic paganism. One large room is believed to have been used to initiate priests in the cult. Some maintain, however, that the site was used for sacred purposes beginning in the 12th century, and was intended as a re-creation fo the Holy Land inspired by Crusader's tales.

In 782 AD, Emperor Charlemagne prohibited the practice of paganism in his lands. Shortly thereafter, hermit monks settled into caves in the base of the rocks at Externsteine, probably to Christianize the site and drive out its evil powers. The monks carved staircases and beautiful reliefs in the walls, and used a spectacular roofless chapel atop a high pillar for prayer.

After the Middle Ages, Externsteine passed to the local counts and served successively as a fortress, a pleasure palace and a prison, undergoing many alterations in the process. It was restored to its original form early in the 19th century.

In recent history, Externsteine has received the attention of German nationalists, including Heinrich Himmler, who in 1933 presided over the "Externsteine Foundation." Some visitors to Externsteine today are still motivated by extreme nationalism, even neo-Nazism. Just a few miles from Externsteine is Hermanns Denkmal, a monument to German nationalism.

Today, Externsteine is a popular tourist attraction but it also draws many spiritual devotees. Most modern pilgrims to Externsteine are New Age followers, who are attracted to the site by its astrological aspects and perceived cosmic energy. Neopagans, who identify with the beliefs and rituals of Germanic paganism, are also drawn to Externsteine. Both groups celebrate winter and summer solstices at the site.

What to See
Externsteine is a natural outcropping of five limestone pillars, the tallest of which is 37.5m high. The pillars have been modified and decorated by humans over the centuries in a variety of fascinating and mysterious ways: holes were drilled for no apparent reason; stairs lead to dead ends; platforms serve no clear purpose; and a large space faces the midsummer sunrise. The holes may have symbolized entry-points into the earth to release its energies, as at other rock sanctuaries.

Atop one of the pillars, accessible by a sturdy metal footbridge, is a roofless chapel with a tiny pillar altar carved out of the rock. A 20-inch round window provides a view of the midsummer sunrise and the most northerly rising of the moon.

The first rays of the summer solstice cut an arc of light in the center of the wall behind the altar; the beam of light may have originally rested on a sacred object that was placed on the altar. Christian monks prayed in this chapel in the Middle Ages, and it was likely used as a pagan observatory—perhaps for tracking the sun's path through the zodiac—before that.

A number of beautifully carved reliefs were left by the medieval hermits at Externsteine, the most notable of which is a spectacular 12th-century wall relief of the Descent from the Cross (also called the Tree of Life). The sculpture is Romanesque in style, but heavily influenced by Byzantine art—it is the only known example of Byzantine sculpture art in Germany.

The relief depicts the Irminsul, a pagan tree or pillar representing earth power, bowing down in adoration as the body of Jesus is taken from the cross. As Nicodemus lowers Jesus from the cross (John 19:39-40), he steps on the Irminsul, which curves under his weight.

The sun and moon—important pagan fertility images—are weeping. A snake, the symbol of earth energies in paganism and of evil power in Christianity, is pushed down into the earth beneath the disciples' feet.

To the side of the relief is a series of caves inhabited by the monks, which are no closed off. One of them bears an incription saying it was consecrated as a chapel in 1115.

Source (http://www.sacred-destinations.com/germany/externsteine)

Hersir
Wednesday, September 2nd, 2009, 01:10 PM
Thanks Hersir, I would appreciate that if it isn't too much trouble. Maybe it can be added as an attachment to this thread.:)

Here it is, it was too large to attach so had to upload it elsewhere:
http://dump.no/files/b40576a77c32/Sarkofagsteinen_i_Externstein.pdf