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Siebenbürgerin
Friday, May 29th, 2009, 03:06 PM
Here an interesting piece of information I found on the Walddeutsche:


Walddeutsche Germans (German: Walddeutsche, or Taubdeutsche, Polish: Głuchoniemcy; meaning "speechless people" (from polish głuchy - mute, silent, dumb or głusz from wood), sometimes simply called Polish Germans, the name for a group of German language speakers (14th - 17th c.) on the territory of present-day Sanockie Pits, in Poland.
Haczów. In the 14th century there was a German settlement there called Hanshof. Church under call of Assumption of Holy Mary and St. Michael's Archangel in Haczów (Poland), the oldest wooden gothic temples in Europe, erected in the 14th century, on the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites since 2003.

The term was coined by the polish historians Marcin Bielski, 1531, Szymon Starowolski 1632, bp. Ignacy Krasicki and Wincenty Pol, and is also sometimes used to refer to Germans between Wisłoka and San River part of West Carpathians Plateau and Central Beskidian Piedmont in Poland.

Germans settled in the territory of the Kingdom of Poland (territory of present day Województwo podkarpackie) from the 14th to 16th centuries (see Ostsiedlung), mostly after the region returned to Polish sphere of influence in 1340, when Casimir III of Poland took the Czerwień towns.

The Germans were usually attracted by kings seeking specialists in various trades, such as craftsmen and miners. They usually settled in newer market and mining settlements. The main settlement areas were in the vicinity of Krosno and some language islands in the Pits and the Rzeszów regions. The settlers in the Pits region were known as Uplander Sachsen. Until approximately the 15th century, the ruling classes of most cities in present day Beskidian Piedmont consisted almost exclusively of Germans.
The village of Markowa. The typical "Umgebindehaus" - houses, about 150-200 km southeast of Kraków, around 18/19th century, built in the style of ancient mountain Walddeutsche atmosphere.
Subcarpathian (Małopolska) Germans in the XVth century.

The Beskidian Germans were, as the Poles, subjected to voluntary Polonization in the latter half of the 17th and the beginning of the 18th century.

Settlement

Important cities of this region ; Pilzno, Brzostek, Biecz, Gorlice, Ropczyce, Wielopole Skrzyńskie, Frysztak, Jasło, Krosno, Czudec, Rzeszów, Łańcut, Tyczyn, Brzozów, Jaćmierz, Rymanów, Ropczyce, Przeworsk, Jarosław, Kańczuga, Przemyśl, Dynów, Brzozów, Sanok.

Some pictures:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/37/Kosciol_Haczow.JPG

Haczów. In the 14th century there was a German settlement there called Hanshof. Church under call of Assumption of Holy Mary and St. Michael's Archangel in Haczów (Poland), the oldest wooden gothic temples in Europe, erected in the 14th century, on the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites since 2003.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7c/Markowa_chata_przyslupowa.jpg/800px-Markowa_chata_przyslupowa.jpg

The village of Markowa. The typical "Umgebindehaus" - houses, about 150-200 km southeast of Kraków, around 18/19th century, built in the style of ancient mountain Walddeutsche atmosphere.

And a map:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c2/GermanHamletsSince15th.jpg/800px-GermanHamletsSince15th.jpg

Subcarpathian (Małopolska) Germans in the XVth century.

The source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walddeutsche