PDA

View Full Version : Difference Between Anglo-Saxon and Bruenn?



Nebulus
Sunday, April 19th, 2009, 08:59 AM
What is the main difference between an anglo saxon person in Britian and a Bruenn person in Britian. From what I've known, they are both the more robust type of the nordic group but I can not spot a minor difference between them. Would you help me find them?

RedJack
Monday, April 20th, 2009, 06:38 PM
Bruenn would tend to be rougher featured, rufous, very pale-skinned, wider, flatter faced with a small pudgy nose. Anglo-Saxon type is more Nordic, (thinner faced, sharper features, long thin nose) but larger from Bruenn admixture. Paul Hogan is the classic example.

mvbeleg
Monday, April 20th, 2009, 10:21 PM
Bruenn would tend to be rougher featured, rufous, very pale-skinned, wider, flatter faced with a small pudgy nose. Anglo-Saxon type is more Nordic, (thinner faced, sharper features, long thin nose) but larger from Bruenn admixture. Paul Hogan is the classic example.

I would not describe the Bruenn types's nose as being small. It, however, does not typically protrude forward from the face.

RedJack
Saturday, April 25th, 2009, 09:34 PM
Small in comparison to the rest of the face and short in length with a certain distance from the upper lip;

in caricature
http://www.theapricity.com/snpa/bilder/caricature.jpg
http://www.theapricity.com/snpa/bilder/mcguinnessnew.jpg

Nebulus
Tuesday, May 5th, 2009, 07:16 AM
Okay, I've been researching this recently and so far I have found that anglo saxon seems to have a broader nose(sharper at the bottom), wide zygomatic bones but only at the top. The bottom of the zygomatic bones seems to be more narrow. They also have a higher vault, which seems to be a nordic trait.

However, bruenn is also high headed as well...so I can't conclude this yet. Can you guys give me clear pictures highlighting the features of both anglo-saxon, bruenn, and bruenn-nordic? I think that would help to see what you have been seeing from them.

mvbeleg
Wednesday, May 6th, 2009, 04:28 AM
I believe that most everyone here on Skadi who uses the term uses Bruenn in the sense that SNPA uses it. I use it in this sense.


http://www.nilacharal.com/enter/celeb/images/DanielCraig.jpg

http://blogs.thetimes.co.za/gatherer/files/2008/11/daniel_craig_97.jpg

In my opinion, Daniel Craig is a good example of the Bruenn type.



http://photos.posh24.com/p/255487/l/jonathan_rhys_meyers/sorry_girls_jonathan_rhys_meyers_is_take n.jpg

http://imgserv.ya.com/galerias2.ya.com/img/d/d15c6115d1321a96i3.jpg

In my opinion, John Rhys Meyers is good example of a Bruenn/Nordid mix. While he has a good deal Cromagnid features, note his somewhat longer, narrow, lighter features. Bruenns tend to have rather flat noses. In contrast to this, Myers' nose is somewhat sharpened although it still has broadness.


As for the Anglo-Saxon type, I personally do not use this terminology.

Nebulus
Wednesday, May 6th, 2009, 06:47 PM
Thanks Mvbeleg. However, I do see a great difference between anglo-saxon type and the bruenn-nordid type. Like for instance, the anglo-saxon nose would be thicker at the top but gets narrow down at the bottom. Do you see this? Same thing for the cheekbone. It gets thicker at the top and then gets narrow at the bottom...

Maybe the anglo-saxon type is just a culture thing and the vikings who came over were also cro-magnid as well. I saw a picture of a swedish guy who has a very strong robust face and I classified him as faelid...

Also I noticed that the bruenn type usually have those type of eye colors(strikingly blue). Mel Gibson also has that eye color as well...and my dad has it too.

mvbeleg
Thursday, May 7th, 2009, 01:04 AM
When types mix, the outcome may not be stable. The phenotypes for mixes, may not always appears similar. Mixing Bruenn and Nordid may come out looking differently. When I use the terminology Bruenn/Nordid, I do not mean that it is a stabilized type within itself; rather a mixture of the two with the former type being dominant over the latter.

What is referred to as the Anglo-Saxon type is likely a mixture of several types. Apparently, Nordid and Cromagnid influence both are involved. The so called Anglo-Saxon type, in my opinion, does not involve ordinary Nordid and Bruenn classical features, just as you have suggested. It is indeed a look all of its own.

I have not noticed that the so-called Anglo-Saxon type has a thicker nose bridge as compared to the Bruenn type. I would think they are about the same in width at the top.

Barreldriver
Thursday, May 7th, 2009, 01:13 AM
I would not describe the Bruenn types's nose as being small. It, however, does not typically protrude forward from the face.

Tends to be more of a bulb shape IMO, and in the largeness of the head and face seems to be one of the less prominent features, take for instance myself, my nose is quite lost in the overall structure of my face and head, not too sure if that's specific to being Bruenn, or perhaps a result of Alpinization within the Bruenn type.

kosmodium
Friday, May 15th, 2009, 03:43 PM
The Anglo-Saxons' forehead is higher and the Jawline more angular then the Brunn. The Brunns nose always seems to have a wide bridge and is usually snubbed or short in comparison to the Anglos which are somewhat convex and thinner with more flaring nostrils.
Think of a Falid with a higher forehead and slightly less flaring jaw.
or a more compressed Hallstatt Nordic.

GoedelGlass
Monday, June 22nd, 2009, 04:16 AM
I think daniel craig makes a much better Keltic-nordic than a Bruenn. I'm no expert tho.