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Dagna
Thursday, February 5th, 2009, 05:09 PM
Facebook, the New Social Disease


Accompanying the announcement that more than 150 million people are active on Facebook last week (and even more amazing, that half of them login daily) is a new series of security and legal issues surrounding its use. When exactly is your account compromised by a piece of software that may not be acting in your best interests? Or could it be something that is more sinister, or just human error?

Don’t you pine for those simple days when the line between software and malware was pretty easy to delineate? Consider these news items:


Last week, Facebook sued the Brazilian site Power.com, claiming that its automated login process violated their terms of service. According to the LA Times, Power has agreed to use Facebook Connect, but the suit brings up all sorts of issues that aren’t so clear cut: is Power providing a service for its users, by consolidating several social networking logins? Or is it doing something that it shouldn’t, by storing these credentials? How is that different from any number of sites that allow me to cross-post messages to different video or blog sites?
Last December, we saw the Koobface trojan that spreads through social network news feed messages, prompting users to download what they think is an update to the Adobe Flash player but is really malware.
This was similar to a Brazilian-based attack that plagued Twitter last summer.
Earlier last fall over in Russia, we saw email/SMS pitches for people to download a Java applet to their cell phones that was spread via the Russian social network Vkontakte. Once on their phones, the app would automatically text several premium numbers that would be charged back to the user.


The trouble is that as these attacks proliferate, it gets harder to differentiate them with legit situations where people are just making dumb mistakes. Consider the situation where a new social networking user doesn’t understand the very optional step when he or she signs up and is asked whether or not to send email invitations to their entire address book. In just a few seconds, a simple task of joining the network has turned into an annoying one sending out hundreds of unwanted emails. Sometimes this step isn’t explained well in the sign-up process, or sometimes people aren’t paying attention. Either way, it isn’t malevolent; it is just a stupid user error.

Or take instant messaging, which seems so quaint now that there are lots of other networks out there. Yes, there are malware programs that propagate through IM, and there are security products that protect IM networks too. But nothing can stop human stupidity in how these IM networks are used, particularly if you store your IM login credentials on a family computer that is shared by several people. One of my colleagues has been having IM conversations with the wrong people – some that have gone on for ten or 15 minutes, before he realized he was talking to the intended’s spouse or kids. Why anyone leave his or her IM account wide open in this way is hard to understand. But it points out that just because someone is signed into IM, doesn’t mean that they are there. Remember, on the Internet no one knows that your dog hasn’t logged instead of you.

Then there are sites like omgxd.com that use your login information for IM networks, supposedly to make it easier to connect but in reality spam all of your contacts on your buddy list. Heyxd.com is another one. I have tried to find out whether these two sites are legit or have some sinister purpose. I can’t really tell, but I would recommend steering clear of both of them.

So the next time you get an email or IM or text message asking you to download a greeting card, update your Flash player, or do something else, take a moment to stop and think whether this is a request that you should just hit the delete key and move on. You don’t need to be the latest victim of a new social networking disease.

http://itmanagement.earthweb.com/secu/article.php/3796271/Facebook-the-New-Social-Disease.htm

TheGreatest
Saturday, February 7th, 2009, 11:43 PM
I don't think facebook is a bad idea. It has allowed my relatives to keep in track of each other much more effectively and easily.
The only thing I don't like is the amount of personal information on it. If the rumors of Facebook being owned by the CIA is true, in theory they could easily identify who you are through your IP (and without contacting the ISP), which would allow them to bypass court restrictions and all.

Hulda.Kin
Sunday, February 8th, 2009, 12:48 AM
I use Facebook and find it is useful although a lot of time got wasted when I first joined up as I received lots of applications for all sorts of nonsense so now I have my account only for the people I know instead of accepting friend requests form anyone who asked... I thought that was what was required... so I wised up. If the application is heathen related then I like it :-)

It's been very useful for keeping up with relatives and friends who live a long way away from me(interstate and O/S)... like anything, FB or the net in general can be a useful tool or a waste of ones time and/or life.

FB or any of those other internet social forums can get in the way of a real life and for some people it is their only life... ok if the person is housebound or disabled but too many healthy folk are spending most of their spare time on the internet instead of out in the fresh air.

If FB is set up by the CIA well... so be it... I've never considered the internet as being private anyway... you might be by yourself behind a screen but what you're typing goes out to 'x' amount of people. If you want privacy stay off the net :-)

TheGreatest
Sunday, February 8th, 2009, 05:07 AM
I use Facebook and find it is useful although a lot of time got wasted when I first joined up as I received lots of applications for all sorts of nonsense so now I have my account only for the people I know instead of accepting friend requests form anyone who asked... I thought that was what was required... so I wised up. If the application is heathen related then I like it :-)

It's been very useful for keeping up with relatives and friends who live a long way away from me(interstate and O/S)... like anything, FB or the net in general can be a useful tool or a waste of ones time and/or life.

FB or any of those other internet social forums can get in the way of a real life and for some people it is their only life... ok if the person is housebound or disabled but too many healthy folk are spending most of their spare time on the internet instead of out in the fresh air.

If FB is set up by the CIA well... so be it... I've never considered the internet as being private anyway... you might be by yourself behind a screen but what you're typing goes out to 'x' amount of people. If you want privacy stay off the net :-)



It's a great way to learn about your every single detail without having to get a search warrent. All the FBI needs to do is create a White Nationalist site, and everyone who joins, can have their IP referenced with their Myspace and Facebook IP.
No need to hassle ISPs or any other barriers that will be hesitant to release the information of their clients


Plus there is stuff that you would otherwise never be able to learn from a search warrant or a background check. Such as list of friends, relatives, your favorite hobbies, et al.

SwordOfTheVistula
Monday, February 9th, 2009, 04:34 PM
If I get FaceBook can I qualify for SSDI?

CrimWheat
Saturday, February 14th, 2009, 08:54 PM
I use Facebook as a means of survey. I like to check who's in interracial relationships, what percentage of relationships are interracial, how many people have foreign surnames, how many people look mixed etc etc.

I'd say it's healthier than rival sites like Mypace, since generally you're communicating with people you know in real life, and not faux-suicidal bisexual mascara drenched emo attention whores.

Cythraul
Saturday, February 14th, 2009, 09:10 PM
Back before Facebook existed, I quit MySpace for good. Reasons being that I began to identify a trend among my generation where people forego traditional methods of human interaction in favour of new, digital ones. I don't view it as healthy and I don't wish to deduce my personality down to several preset sections of information which are searchable, storable and misrepresentative of the complex character that is me. I don't mean to sound conceited - we're all worth more than that.

Needless to say, I don't even know what a Facebook page looks like, because I never signed up and never intend to.

Dagna
Sunday, February 22nd, 2009, 05:02 AM
'Get off Facebook and get a life'


A psychologist is urging people to get off Facebook and other social networking sites, and get a life instead.

Dr Aric Sigman says the amount of time we spend with each other has slumped dramatically and in turn is damaging our health.

He says our devotion to such sites could alter the way genes work, upset immune responses, hormone levels, and the function of arteries, and influence mental performance.

Levels of hormones such as the "cuddle chemical" oxytocin, which promotes bonding, altered according to whether people were in close contact or not.

This could increase the risk of health problems as serious as cancer, strokes, heart disease, and dementia.

Dr Sigman spells out his warning in the latest issue of Biologist, the journal of the Institute of Biology, and maintains that social networking sites have played a significant role in people becoming more isolated.

He said: "Social networking is the internet's biggest growth area, particular among young children.

"A quarter of British children have a laptop or computer in their room by the age of five and they have their own social networking sites, like the BBC's myCBBC. It's causing huge changes."

Dr Sigman said 209 "socially regulated" genes have been identified, including ones involved in the immune system, cell proliferation and responses to stress.

Electronic media is also undermining the ability of children and young people to learn vital social skills and read body language, he said.

Dr Sigman continued: "One of the most pronounced changes in the daily habits of British citizens is a reduction in the number of minutes per day that they interact with another human being.

"In less than two decades, the number of people saying there is no one with whom they discuss important matters nearly tripled.

"Parents spend less time with their children than they did only a decade ago. Britain has the lowest proportion of children in all of Europe who eat with their parents at the table. The proportion of people who work at home alone continues to rise.

"I am worried about where this is all leading. It's not that I'm old fashioned in terms of new technology, but the purpose of any new technology should be to provide a tool that enhances our lives.

"Social networking sites should allow us to embellish our social lives, but what we find is very different. The tail is wagging the dog. These are not tools that enhance, they are tools that displace."

Research suggests the number of hours people spend interacting face-to-face has fallen dramatically since 1987 as electronic media use increases.

http://uk.news.yahoo.com/4/20090219/tuk-get-off-facebook-and-get-a-life-dba1618.html

Eoppoyz
Sunday, February 22nd, 2009, 01:50 PM
That's true. I have Facebook too, but I logged in to Facebook for few days ago so I'm not a "Facebookaddict".

Gustavus Magnus
Sunday, February 22nd, 2009, 02:37 PM
That's true. I have Facebook too, but I logged in to Facebook for few days ago so I'm not a "Facebookaddict".

It's true? It's true that Facebook is altering our genes?

Eoppoyz
Sunday, February 22nd, 2009, 02:42 PM
It's true? It's true that Facebook is altering our genes?

Of course not.

Sigurd
Sunday, February 22nd, 2009, 03:33 PM
I'm very active on online fora, but I still have real life friends I see for a beer every now and again. I don't need to get a life, I already got one. :D

Kriemhild
Sunday, February 22nd, 2009, 03:40 PM
I've seen many of my peers and friends fall prey to Facebook, and before that MySpace. I've not allowed myself to have one. :P

Eoppoyz
Sunday, February 22nd, 2009, 03:52 PM
I'm too active in different forums.

Löwenherz
Friday, February 27th, 2009, 08:00 AM
I don't think it would be reasonable for anyone who spends a lot of time on Skadi to criticize anyone who spends a lot of time on a different social networking site. I have my own balancing act to manage; we all do. Sure, online dialogue is not the same as meatspace interaction, and in some ways it compares unfavorably. In the real world, though, there are other ways in which it compares very favorably.

What's better, to have a useful and meaningful dialogue with someone who shares your values and beliefs that you can't hug and may have never met, or to limit yourself to meatspace interactions with the people in your immediate vicinity so you can hug a lot and try to keep your oxytocin up?

I think the ideal would be to have a rich and satisfying meatspace network AND a rich and satisfying internet community, and I also think that most of us are in different ways and for different reasons NOT living the ideal life, so we do the best we can with what we have. Some of us will be heavier on the meatspace side and lighter in cyberspace, some vice versa.

Has any research been done on what kinds of hormones and neurotransmitters are released when a person on one end of an internet conversation has a moment in which he realizes that he has made a long-distance connection with a kindred spirit? I'm all for hugs, but come on--there are many ways to get psychic and hormonal rewards....

Nachtengel
Friday, February 27th, 2009, 09:26 AM
I don't think it would be reasonable for anyone who spends a lot of time on Skadi to criticize anyone who spends a lot of time on a different social networking site.
I think it would. Skadi serves a constructive purpose. It educates people about ethnicity, race, etc. Can that be said about all other social networking sites?

In other words, spend time on the Internet, but for a constructive purpose mostly.

Löwenherz
Friday, February 27th, 2009, 10:28 PM
Skadi serves a constructive purpose. It educates people about ethnicity, race, etc. Can that be said about all other social networking sites?
I don't know what "all" SNS would include, but it can certainly be said of Facebook. Skadi, Facebook, or any other networking site is going to have a bell curve of participation, from the really active and positive core members who keep the whole thing moving forward on one end, to the slackers and hecklers and people who just don't get it on the other end, through the big swollen belly of rank and file participants in the middle.

Facebook allows people to keep in touch and share pictures and thoughts. It's fast and easy. Sure it can be abused, and life can be wasted sitting in front of the computer. (And I'm just guessing here, but I'd bet $50 that there are at least a few people who spend too much time on Skadi, given their other time commitments and obligations, unless you're telling me that there's "no such thing" as too much Skadi".... ;))

I'm sure when the telephone was invented there were people who got offended at the notion of relatively impersonal communication and thought "if he really had something important to say, he'd stop by for a personal visit". And there were people who spent way too much time on the phone and should have spent more time talking to the people around them in meatspace (still happens today). And somehow as a culture, MOST of us learn how to balance the utility of the tool against its addictive tendencies and we muddle forward.

Reynard
Friday, February 27th, 2009, 11:16 PM
I cancelled my facebook account. All I got was a load of school friends who I never spoke to at the time and have no interest in speaking to now!!

Nachtengel
Saturday, February 28th, 2009, 03:22 AM
I don't know what "all" SNS would include, but it can certainly be said of Facebook. Skadi, Facebook, or any other networking site is going to have a bell curve of participation, from the really active and positive core members who keep the whole thing moving forward on one end, to the slackers and hecklers and people who just don't get it on the other end, through the big swollen belly of rank and file participants in the middle.

Facebook allows people to keep in touch and share pictures and thoughts. It's fast and easy. Sure it can be abused, and life can be wasted sitting in front of the computer. (And I'm just guessing here, but I'd bet $50 that there are at least a few people who spend too much time on Skadi, given their other time commitments and obligations, unless you're telling me that there's "no such thing" as too much Skadi".... ;))

I'm sure when the telephone was invented there were people who got offended at the notion of relatively impersonal communication and thought "if he really had something important to say, he'd stop by for a personal visit". And there were people who spent way too much time on the phone and should have spent more time talking to the people around them in meatspace (still happens today). And somehow as a culture, MOST of us learn how to balance the utility of the tool against its addictive tendencies and we muddle forward.
As I said;
I don't think there's a problem with spending time on the Internet. But I think just like when you do things IRL, you shouldn't waste most of your time with irrelevancies. I tried MySpace but I abandoned it because it was boring and I felt like wasting my time over there. But racialist boards help to awaken people. It's not simple chit chat. There's chit chat here too, but there is a goal beyond it. MySpace, FaceBook and the like have no well defined goal. They just put people in touch. When you get a friend request you never know what this person's convictions are or what the race is. On racialist forums you can, it's easier to choose your discussion company.

Ragnar Lodbrok
Saturday, February 28th, 2009, 04:28 AM
As I said;
I don't think there's a problem with spending time on the Internet. But I think just like when you do things IRL, you shouldn't waste most of your time with irrelevancies. I tried MySpace but I abandoned it because it was boring and I felt like wasting my time over there. But racialist boards help to awaken people. It's not simple chit chat. There's chit chat here too, but there is a goal beyond it. MySpace, FaceBook and the like have no well defined goal. They just put people in touch. When you get a friend request you never know what this person's convictions are or what the race is. On racialist forums you can, it's easier to choose your discussion company.

I only use my myspace for music, showing off my artwork and photo skills and making playlists and thats pretty much it, I don't really use it to socialize. If anyone wants to hear my sweet playlist by the way I have the link to it right on my Skadi profile. :D

Teutonic
Wednesday, March 4th, 2009, 12:56 AM
I think it would. Skadi serves a constructive purpose. It educates people about ethnicity, race, etc. Can that be said about all other social networking sites?

In other words, spend time on the Internet, but for a constructive purpose mostly.


I think you would be surprised how much contact with racialists and patriots there are on facebook. I like it because unlike my German facebook meinvz and myspace, there has not been one time where they shut down a group I have or friends have due to it being to conservative.It is a good forum for like minded people to get intouch with and talk about issues that concern us and its a far broader and bigger forum than Skadi.I have a link on my page to Skadi as well.Your right about one thing though I dont think its as constructive as Skadi. But I like meeting more people who value the same things I do.

Like others stated I have friends that I go have a beer with, and I like working out with freinds and going to concerts with my friends. I dont need to get off of facebook to get a life I have one.

Vandal Lord
Wednesday, March 4th, 2009, 01:39 AM
I don't think you can compare a site like Skadi with sites like MySpace and FaceBook as others have already pointed out. For some of us this is the only way to communicate and keep in touch with fellow Germanic Preservationalists. It's not like most of us can just easily go out into our local areas and meet a bunch of Germanic Preservationalists with liked minded beliefs or views, most people are either apathetic or automatically find us racists for just wanting to preserve our peoples. Skadi is all we have at the moment for mass communication, with all of us scattered across the world we can't really just get together on the weekends have meetings and hang out for obvious reasons.

Löwenherz
Wednesday, March 4th, 2009, 02:47 AM
...you shouldn't waste most of your time with irrelevancies.
That would knock out a fair chunk of the Skadi threads....


I tried MySpace but I abandoned it because it was boring and I felt like wasting my time over there.
Me, too, on a personal level. But I still use myspace to promote bands, because that's one of the "goals" of myspace.


MySpace, FaceBook and the like have no well defined goal.
I disagree. Myspace is so far THE social networking site to promote music on. It's also a good site to find sex partners, from what I hear. :-O

And for Facebook I'd say 'keeping in touch with long distance friends and relations' is a goal in itself. Why should I limit myself to random emails and phone convos when I can check out pictures, links, stories, and whatever as they occur (and process all of my 'keeping in touch' at one time that suits me)?

-------


You're right about one thing though I dont think its as constructive as Skadi.

I have friends that I go have a beer....
This seems a little contradictory. If it's okay to go have a beer in meatspace, just to hang out, why is the equivalent not okay in cyberspace? Why does internet activity have to be justified with some higher purpose, if meatspace activity doesn't?

Löwenherz
Wednesday, March 4th, 2009, 03:27 AM
So as it happens, I went from here to Facebook (making the rounds, so to speak), and among other things, I was tipped to this very cool site through a guy I don't even know--a music industry guy I respect--who posted the link in his status update.

https://ssd.eff.org/ is a project of the Electronic Frontier Foundation to educate people in "surveillance self-defense".

Maybe the quality of one's Facebook experience depends on the quality of one's social network....

TheGreatest
Wednesday, March 4th, 2009, 04:21 AM
I've been pretending that I am not using facebook. I fine that a lot of people are becoming addicted to it. They expect me to update my profile every day and take photos of random stuff. No...

Nachtengel
Tuesday, November 14th, 2017, 03:29 PM
Being alone at your computer is “socializing.”

Being fed ads and fake news by algorithms is “being informed.”

Having your entire life online is “privacy.”

Big Zuck is watching you – for your own good. And also because he makes craptons of money from doing it.

Slate :

Are Facebook and other social media companies intentionally exploiting people’s psychological vulnerabilities to keep them addicted?

You bet, says Sean Parker, who made a fortune as an early Facebook investor and its first president. In an interview with Axios’ Mike Allen this week, Parker said that he has become something of a “conscientious objector” to social media. And he reflected with some regret on his own role in helping to mold the sort of company that Facebook would become.

“The thought process was all about, ‘How do we consume as much of your time and conscious attention as possible?’,” he said. “And that means that we need to sort of give you a little dopamine hit every once in a while, because someone liked or commented on a photo or a post or whatever, and that’s going to get you to contribute more content, and that’s going to get you more likes and comments. It’s a social validation feedback loop. … You’re exploiting a vulnerabilty in human psychology.”

Very nice of you to tell us this, buddy.

Too bad you had to wait until our whole society was completely zucked before you warned us

Parker went on: “I think the inventors, creators—it’s me, it’s Mark [Zuckerberg], it’s Kevin Systrom at Instagram, it’s all of these people—understood this, consciously. And we did it anyway.”



Even so, Parker’s recollections are instructive because they undercut the company’s claims to be driven by the lofty mission of making the world open and connected—or as the latest version has it, building community and bringing the world closer together.

Facebook is a horrible website. I absolutely hate it. The interface is confusing and cluttered, and everything about it is boring and tedious.

So it’s not surprising at all that the service’s popularity is based on psychological manipulation of human weaknesses, rather than on being a good service.

And of course, in spite of all this “online socializing,” people are more lonely and individualistic than ever. So what is even the point of these apps?

At the same time that Facebook was taking flak from Parker for its addictive qualities, another Silicon Valley startup was provoking similar criticisms. TechCrunch this week profiled a company founded by a neuropsychologist and a neuroeconomist with the goal of using machine learning to make other companies’ apps more, well, addictive. The startup’s name, aptly enough: Dopamine Labs. (It was also featured in an April episode of CBS’ 60 Minutes on the theme of “brain hacking.”)

Per TechCrunch’s story, Dopamine Labs has built a software program called Skinner—yes, it’s named after the behaviorist psychologist B.F. Skinner—that monitors an app’s various prompts and notifications and how users respond to them. The goal is to help companies tweak those features to make them maximally sticky. The company claims its service can add an average of 10 percent to the revenues of the startups that use it. “If all of that sounds creepy,” writes TechCrunch’s Jonathan Shieber, “don’t worry, it is.”

And now this whole notion of “brain hacking” is spreading everywhere in the software industry, including videogames. You can’t buy a mainstream title anymore without having to endure this whole “loot crates” bullshit designed to trigger psychological addiction.

I can’t think of a more direct attack on society than engineering a technology that is expertly designed to keep people addicted and wasting hours upon hours everyday. These things are destroying the productive capacity of entire nations.

There’s no doubt that they should be regulated.https://dailystormer.hk/facebook-founder-admits-company-is-destroying-society/

Nachtengel
Friday, March 16th, 2018, 07:50 AM
Facebook Survey Asked Users If They’d Like Child Porn On The Site

Facebook is already apologizing for a survey, shown to a small number of users on Sunday, which solicited opinions on what Facebook’s policy should be if an adult man “asks a 14-year-old girl for sexual pictures.” The Guardian first reported on the survey, which more generally asked some users how they thought Facebook should handle grooming behavior.

Facebook VP of Product Guy Rosen apologized for the survey on Twitter, describing it as a “mistake.”

“We run surveys to understand how the community thinks about how we set policies,” Rosen said. “But this kind of activity is and will always be completely unacceptable on FB. We regularly work with authorities if identified. It shouldn’t have been part of this survey. That was a mistake.”

According to The Guardian, the survey didn’t just ask how Facebook should handle such content. According to the report, the possible range of responses to the question went all the way from “this content should not be allowed on Facebook, and no one should be able to see it” to “this content should be allowed on Facebook, and I would not mind seeing it.”

In a separate comment to the newspaper, Facebook said that “we understand this survey refers to offensive content that is already prohibited on Facebook and that we have no intention of allowing so have stopped the survey. We have prohibited child grooming on Facebook since our earliest days; we have no intention of changing this and we regularly work with the police to ensure that anyone found acting in such a way is brought to justice.”http://bgr.com/2018/03/05/facebook-survey-pedophilia-oops/