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MutterundKind
Thursday, January 29th, 2009, 07:54 PM
We currently have 5 chickens, we get an average of 3-4 eggs a day. We started out with 10 but 1 died the first night we got them and the rest just disappeared along with 1 cockrel.

They are so much happier to lay eggs now the cock has gone!

Does any one else have chickens?

Kriemhild
Thursday, January 29th, 2009, 08:17 PM
When I was younger and lived further north we kept chickens - I found them terribly fun as a child. :) We also had horses and a few other animals. I absolutely love living in a rural setting.

thricelost
Monday, February 16th, 2009, 07:01 PM
We have 4 chickens. Since we live in a suburban setting, we expirimented with different breeds to get the quietest ones. Speckled Sussex seem to be nearly silent, though they don't lay quite as often as the others (and don't lay the cool green eggs like the Americauna).

Chickens get taken by predators, even in urban settings, easier than imaginable. We buried the chicken wire a foot under the ground and bent a little inwards, so nothing can dig underneath.

Eggs from your own chickens are amazing, aren't they? Thick and orange-yolked and way better than anything at the store, even "organic." And those suckers are hard to break open! Must be all the bugs and plants they eat as the wander around the backyard.

FriggasSpindle
Saturday, February 21st, 2009, 12:12 AM
I don't have chickens yet, even though living on 25 acres I have no excuse to not have chickens. I guess it's me just being lazy. I do raise Scottish Highland Cattle though, and we're eating our way through our first slaughtered calf. It's really good meat. Even if having the deed done was really, really hard. I should get my butt in gear and get some chickens.

michael
Thursday, February 26th, 2009, 08:23 AM
I am striving to be more self sufficient and have 9 chooks. At the present time only 1 is old enough to lay but, she is laying every day.

L÷wenherz
Friday, February 27th, 2009, 06:51 AM
I just 'inherited' five chickens today from a woman who had to get rid of hers due to a move. Should be interesting. If this goes well, we'll add more.

Willow
Friday, February 27th, 2009, 10:21 AM
How do you tell the fertilised eggs from the unfertilised ones you can eat, I mean if you have a cockerel there too...?

Hrodnand
Friday, February 27th, 2009, 10:35 AM
My grandparents have chickens but since they live in a rural area they are doing it on a large scale.:thumbup
I've visited them last weekend and right now they have around 80 ready to hatch.


How do you tell the fertilised eggs from the unfertilised ones you can eat, I mean if you have a cockerel there too...?

After a while that the fertilization happened you can see it by holding the egg against a stronger source of light, you should see a black spot in the center of the egg which is the fertilized cell, usually unfertilized eggs don't have it, but be careful with the light, do that only in the evening and for a real short period of time. The inner cells are quite sensitive to light and heat changes.

Zimobog
Friday, February 27th, 2009, 04:12 PM
What a good thread...

I used to keep Rhode Island Reds, a few Barred Rocs and some Buffs. I never kept a rooster at all. There were always plenty of eggs!

We never "over-wintered" any birds, so it is a little strange to imagine bringing in new pullets in February. How cold is it were you guys are at? Cold really affects the layers.

A good first step to bring up chickens is to take measures to eliminate their predators. I never heard of a weasel that couldn't get thru chickenwire.

Domesticated dogs are a problem too for the suburban fowler.

michael
Friday, February 27th, 2009, 10:36 PM
How do you tell the fertilised eggs from the unfertilised ones you can eat, i mean if you have a cockerel there too...?

If the eggs are collected every day you can eat both.

Arundel
Saturday, November 28th, 2009, 02:45 AM
Chicken miracle.
I have a neighbor who incubated an egg on her desk under a grown light. Her grandson brought an egg home someone had given him, and he wanted to try hatching it. She said she turned it every day, and lo and behold she had a chicken.
She built a nice new house for it, and got another chicken to keep it company. She has been having trouble with the town government. They don't want her to have one in town. She doesn't have any crowing roosters, so they don't hurt anyone.
I wish I had some chickens.
Arundel

SpearBrave
Saturday, November 28th, 2009, 03:39 AM
I would like to have chickens some day, as we had them when I was a child.


My only problem is that I raise English Setter bird dogs and every time they are around chickens that is all they are focused on. They do not hurt the chickens they just point at them. I do not want to scold the dogs for doing something they are bred to do. Sometimes my dogs will point a game bird or chicken for hours without moving just hoping someone will flush the bird and shoot it so they can go and retrieve it.


Raising chickens would be fun, and having fresh eggs and meat would be nice to.

earle
Thursday, December 17th, 2009, 03:14 AM
I have 5 acres of prime California dirt, which came with a chicken coop. When the times were tighter, it made sense to pass along any organic trash to the chickens for means of composting. We have yet to use the compost for anything.

It turned out not to be fiscally viable, as a dozen eggs would cost between 1.50 and 2.50. Being rural (for California, at least) means we have at least one neighbor selling eggs for 2$ a dozen. We had purchased banty hens, which helped (same size and frequency of eggs, with less feed costs). After a couple of years, a dog got in our new coop, and that was the end of that.


If the eggs are collected every day you can eat both.
This is indeed true. Even when we were somewhat lax in collecting them, we never noticed anything different from one egg to the next.

I did notice a big difference when we went back to store bought eggs. Tiny, and when you go to crack the first few, you wind up with a handful of eggshell and egg... noting that the mass produced variety are more like a porcelain cup and less like a coconut helps.

Bernhard
Thursday, December 17th, 2009, 09:01 AM
We had 15 chickens untill a couple of days ago. We brought 6 young roosters to an uncle of mine who taught me how to slaughter them.
It's nice having chickens, collecting the eggs in your own backyard every morning, eating good meat out of your backyard once in a while and they are just fun animals.

Valbiorn
Tuesday, January 19th, 2010, 09:10 PM
heh, we used to have chickens years ago. I think I gave them away because I didn't have time to take care of them. We also had a duck and a rooster, which were inseparable! When the duck went into the river for a swim the rooster tried to follow. Roosters are not good swimmers!

earle
Monday, April 5th, 2010, 10:23 PM
Last week, we re-started with 12 chicks, down to 11 as of this morning.
I guess it is that time of year?

Mistress Klaus
Wednesday, April 7th, 2010, 04:00 AM
I have been thinking of getting a couple of laying hens for some time now, however I have 4 cats. I've heard about the dangers of having dogs around,..but what about cats?... I have a Brush Turkey that practically lives in the garden and the felines leave it alone. The Turkey is so cheeky it will come up onto the pergola and will start eating the cat food from under their noses!! (I have to coax it away with a slice of bread).

theTasmanian
Wednesday, April 7th, 2010, 08:18 AM
Friends had chickens with the dogs and the German Sheppard was fine but the whippet was very naughty and had to go......cats lol the same couple now have a Duck and two chook's and the Duck beats up on the cat:D

I would love chook's but i dont think i could get a permit in town and my dogs would eat them...

SpearBrave
Wednesday, April 7th, 2010, 10:51 AM
^ Germans Shepards are not Field Stock English Setters, My dogs are bird crazy as soon as they open their eyes. I have a pup now that was born in late winter and he is already pointing and holding point. If I chickens around that is all he would think about is pointing those chickens. I could never get him to listen with such distractions around.;)

Bernhard
Wednesday, April 7th, 2010, 11:02 AM
I have been thinking of getting a couple of laying hens for some time now, however I have 4 cats. I've heard about the dangers of having dogs around,..but what about cats?... I have a Brush Turkey that practically lives in the garden and the felines leave it alone. The Turkey is so cheeky it will come up onto the pergola and will start eating the cat food from under their noses!! (I have to coax it away with a slice of bread).

The cats at our place are of no danger to our chickens. They are too afraid to be surrounded by all those chickens.:D Although if one chicken would get out and become seperated from the rest, the cats might attack. It never happened though. And since your cats don't bother the turkey, I think a couple of chickens would be safe as well.

theTasmanian
Wednesday, April 7th, 2010, 11:22 AM
^ Germans Shepards are not Field Stock English Setters, My dogs are bird crazy as soon as they open their eyes. I have a pup now that was born in late winter and he is already pointing and holding point. If I chickens around that is all he would think about is pointing those chickens. I could never get him to listen with such distractions around.;)

I know mate i use to have Weimaraner's ;)

But i now have a Mastiff-X(loud Bitch) and a Dachshund X Jack Russell (Wallaby chaser)

Stefan
Wednesday, November 10th, 2010, 09:46 PM
4 hens, 1 rooster and a Guinea hen.

Wulfsige
Thursday, November 3rd, 2011, 01:16 AM
I have kept and bred fowl all my life, mainly gamefowl.

Northumbria
Friday, January 6th, 2012, 03:45 PM
I used to keep chickens, 30 at a time and free range. On the odd occasion I'd go to the livestock market, buy some poultry and then take them back the week after on a bank holiday. Now bank holidays are when people from the towns attend such markets and prices go ridiculously high, I usually doubled or tripled my money.
I didn't do it too often, but it is a good way of wealth redistribution, namely rich morons pay over the odds for something and I, a pauper make money and spend it on British-made things helping the economy. :D
Most rich people around here have only got where they are through exploitive "careers" such as bankers anyway. :thumbdown

Anyway, the markets went down as the fad for having chickens died down a bit and as for eggs I found I could source them cheaper from a free-range farm shop anyway. The price of corn went up massively and the bags shrunk in size so I sold the hens for good.

I did have a nice cockerel though, a very handsome looking Buff Orpington. He died sadly and is buried under a willow tree which seems to grow very well because of him.
I latter had a little Rhode Island red cockerel before I sold up, he was a nice animal too.

Scario
Friday, January 6th, 2012, 04:00 PM
We raise chickens, ducks, geese, turkeys and pheasants. Also all types of other assorted farm animals.