PDA

View Full Version : What is Your Germanic Background?



Nachtengel
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 01:39 AM
I didn't see such a thread here and I think it'd be interesting to know statistically how many of us are from where. I call it "background" and not ethnicity because I know there are debates whether American is an ethnicity and so forth. ;)

Soten
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 01:45 AM
This one is what you are looking for I bet:
http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=53685&highlight=ancestry

Nachtengel
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 01:48 AM
This one is what you are looking for I bet:
http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=53685&highlight=ancestry
This I believe was started when Skadi had a different orientation (European instead of Germanic) and there were many non-Germanics here. It uses broad terms like European without specifying what kind. My point with this poll is to see statistically how well the Germanic countries are represented on Skadi.

Soten
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 02:01 AM
This I believe was started when Skadi had a different orientation (European instead of Germanic) and there were many non-Germanics here. It uses broad terms like European without specifying what kind. My point with this poll is to see statistically how well the Germanic countries are represented on Skadi.

The last few pages are quite recent-ish. Including the page where I give my ancestry in detail more than anyone would probably care to know.

So, in any case, give an example of what kind of answer you're looking for.

I see now, the poll wasn't up before...

Rozenstorm
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 07:03 AM
This I believe was started when Skadi had a different orientation (European instead of Germanic) and there were many non-Germanics here. It uses broad terms like European without specifying what kind. My point with this poll is to see statistically how well the Germanic countries are represented on Skadi.

Skadi used to be a European forum? I didn't know that... Did they kick out all the non-Germanics then? :P

And about your remark about American ethnicity, there is indeed no such thing. Well, except for Native Americans off course. Other Americans are colonials and there ancestry lies elsewhere, no future without roots!

Inese
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 09:40 AM
I have a 75% Baltic (Latvian) background and a 25% German(ic) background. But I like this Germanic board more than the other one because on the other one people are angry and respectless to me because of my opinion on that argument from a few days back.

The difference between Baltics and Germanics is not that big.

Blood_Axis
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 10:31 AM
^ 75% - 25% as well :)

By the way, why are unregistered guests voting in this poll? They're compromising it's validity :|

Sissi
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 10:33 AM
I'm Austrian.


By the way, why are guests voting in this poll? They're compromising it's validity :|
Not necessarily? It could be interesting to see what kind of audience Skadi has too.

Blood_Axis
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 10:37 AM
Not necessarily? It could be interesting to see what kind of audience Skadi has too.
Hopefully, provided those who are voting are real audience and not trolls :P

SwordOfTheVistula
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 03:36 PM
Hopefully, provided those who are voting are real audience and not trolls :P

We could just add 'troll' as a choice ;)

Mac Seafraidh
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 04:41 PM
Fore me, an insignificant amount of German, however I am very pro-German as long as it has nothing to do with the BRD, DDR, etc. All German history from the beginning to 1945 is what I glorify.

QuietWind
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 05:20 PM
This I believe was started when Skadi had a different orientation (European instead of Germanic) and there were many non-Germanics here. It uses broad terms like European without specifying what kind. My point with this poll is to see statistically how well the Germanic countries are represented on Skadi.


Actually, that thread (http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=53685) was created well after Skadi had changed to Germanic orientation. ;) It was begun in late April 2006, and Skadi changed its orientation (http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=27334)back in late November of 2004.

Thusnelda
Wednesday, January 7th, 2009, 05:21 PM
My background is (Southern)German. :) And I don´t think that "Austrian" should make up an own background! *g* But you mean it in a more national sense, don´t you?

CrimWheat
Thursday, January 8th, 2009, 08:26 PM
.

Deary
Thursday, January 8th, 2009, 08:55 PM
I voted "other Germanic" since I am a Celtogermanic American, not a Germanic American. I hope this is the proper choice. I see a few Americans on the forum voted "Germanic American" when they are actually Celtogermanic. I assumed the option "Germanic American" refers to those who are only Germanic. I also see a few who have partial Germanic ancestry voted "non-Germanic". I'm a bit confused. Perhaps, Todesengel can give us clearer guidelines as for how to vote.

Allenson
Thursday, January 8th, 2009, 09:03 PM
Skadi used to be a European forum? I didn't know that... Did they kick out all the non-Germanics then? :P

Yes, back "in the day" it was dedicated to the preservation of all European ethnicities--and there were some fearsome battles between them all, let me tell you. ;)

And yes again, there was a purge of sorts--not bannings though--just a change in orientation and most non-Germanics left on their own accord. Stirpes might have been born after the shift in focus here....I'm forgetting my timeline a bit though.

SouthernBoy
Thursday, January 8th, 2009, 09:23 PM
I voted "Non-Germanic." :)

Haereticus
Thursday, January 8th, 2009, 09:31 PM
This is tricky to vote on as I, like most people, have 2 parents. One parent English the other Scottish. More than one choice was not permitted. I also have Welsh and Irish ancestry. Many Britons, particularly from the north, would very likely have Scandinavian ancestry not many generations back.

Ocelot
Thursday, January 8th, 2009, 09:50 PM
My background is Dutch, although part of my ancestry can be traced back to Germany, I also have a little Italian blood.

Nachtengel
Friday, January 9th, 2009, 02:42 PM
And I don´t think that "Austrian" should make up an own background! *g* But you mean it in a more national sense, don´t you?
Yes, that's what I mean. That's why I included Americans, Canadians, and so on. They're not ethnicities in the real sense. But I didn't know a better word than background. If I asked nationality, then that would be perceived in a strictly political sense (an Icelandic with Norwegian citizenship would vote "Norwegian" and it wouldn't be accurate for the results I'm interested in).

Telluride
Friday, January 9th, 2009, 03:18 PM
I consider myself a European American of primarily Germanic descent, but also with some French, Irish and Italian ancestry.

Siebenbürgerin
Friday, January 9th, 2009, 11:54 PM
There is an old thread where you can debate whether Americans, Canadians and other people from the New World can be considered ethnicities:

Are American/Canadian/Australian, Etc. Ethnicities?
http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=97219

I'm going to split the posts about this theme there so please follow the link if you want to continue with the discussion. Thanks. :)

On topic: I vote other Germanic since I'm Transylvanian Saxon.

Anfang
Monday, January 12th, 2009, 07:43 PM
BTW isn't this something like the 6th version of the same polll?

I am Sachsen and Iberian celtic from the provinvce of Asturias which was a Suebi (Germanic bastion and the people who gave Spain her first king. Pelayo.

I Identify as German German German and a little german, with Southern European heritage as well. I dont believe in German-American or German-somethingelse. I fully intend to return to Germany and to live my last days there. I see teutonic feels the same way, he put german as his background too.

Sigurd
Thursday, January 15th, 2009, 04:29 AM
I feel that this poll should have been multiple choice, for those who are not of one fixed background, but of several ethnicities, such as is oft the case with Colonial Germanics, and even oft enough these days in Europe: Suppose I got my stepfather here on this forum, he'd have an issue for being half Austrian, half English and growing up in South Africa for the most part. :P

For myself, this poll is of course easy without being multiple choice, from what I've seen so far in my genealogical tree I am 127/128, whereas the 1/128 of non-German ancestry is of a group indigenously residing within the Tyrol anyway, so I'm safely assuming that I am German, and this is how I conscientiously voted.

That is, of course, by counting Austrians as Germans (otherwise I'd have to be one of the mixed voters, my ancestry is partially German, Austrian and to a lesser degree Swiss), which we of course - even though some'd deny it - are: The only reason they're managing to uphold the "Austrians aren't Germans" myth is because of our breathtaking Bajuvarian culture here. :P

Even if it's just a question about nationality, I'll go with Germany for the ease of it. I'm a dual citizen of Austria and Germany anyway, so I'm free to choose either of the two. I grew up in Austria, sure, but I consider myself German for all intents and purposes. ;)

germanbornfemale
Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010, 02:14 AM
Born and raised in Germany to German parents, went to school there, finished my education there and worked there before I went across the Big Pond.

Have now lived in California for the last couple of years.

Ediruc
Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010, 03:05 AM
:O Woops! I did not see German-American way at the bottom. Anyway. I'm German-American, but I have French, Swedish, and Scottish ties. I'm pretty sure I'm connected to the French Huguenots. I'm a Clan Gordon member. On my Swedish side, I am unsure, but people tell me the Swedish in me stands out the most. I'm primarily German though, descended from high class northern Germans.

Wanderer
Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010, 04:43 AM
The difficult part of this poll, I imagine, and this is more from an American perspective, is that few Americans can conclusively pinpoint their ethnic heritage. If you ask the typical American what he or she is, they will give you a LOONNGG list of the ethnicities that they are. For example, I just went on a date with a woman here and she told me that she is German, Irish, and Polish. I don't think I'll be out with her again, and it's not because of the Irish ;) This is the case with many people here, most will give you five or six nationalities that comprise their ethnic makeup, or more (my father would call someone like this a Heinz 57). When I tell people that I'm 15/16 German and 1/16 Danish, it is actually surprising to them a) because I know my genealogy so well and b) because it is so homogeneous. That being said, my story is maybe a little different from others. This might not have been the case for all Germans who came to Wisconsin, or other regions of the US, but in the case of my mother's family history, they came to the US in the mid-1800s (the 48ers), from Rheinland-Pfalz (southeast of Trier). Even after they arrived in Wisconsin, the menfolk sought out German women here in Amerika, and my mother's ancestry remained completely German. I should continue the bloodline, should I not? My father's parents were both born in Germany. Even when my mother and father first became acquainted during grade school, the school was almost, if not all, students of German background. Nonetheless, my father and mother met, and the rest is history. Paternally, I know my ancestry going back to the early 1600s. On my mother's side, a document exists in the state capitol, Madison, that speaks about the genealogy of her great-great grandfather from the Rheinland.

For me, my German blood runs deep...it places me in a kind of purgatory, knowing that the society I live in isn't really my cup of tea, because it is not volkisch enough, and therefore, below me, but I also fear that if I were to join DANK (Deutsche Nationale Kongress) or any other German-American group, I don't know if my tendencies would be very much appreciated. Perhaps I would be too volkisch. This allows me to understand the German perspective in a particular, special way, das was besonders ist. It is a different thread, but there was another one going about how being Germanic doesn't mean that one is a German - this is true. We Americans can't appreciate, can't truly appreciate, the predicament the Germans, still on war-footing, still fighting for survival, find themselves in. Literally the whole world was taught to HATE Germans, and Americans led this re-education, by PURPOSELY selling an untrue fallacy called the holocaust. It's like some blacks will say to white people when a racially-charged issue comes up, 'You just wouldn't understand.' Germans can say the same to everyone.

So, to sum up, some Americans are very aware of their background, and some talk about it like it's a value menu. People who are multi-Caucasoid, let's say, ie (German, Italian, Polish, Scottish, Croat, etc) speak differently about their background, than me, for example, because they see it differently. I see my blood as something to be preserved, due to the effortsof my ancestors, but it is very difficult to find a woman of German blood, or at least Germanic blood, that is constant.

Zimobog
Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010, 06:00 AM
I choose Germanic American for lack of a better label in the poll.

My mother's paternal side is recent arrivals (late 1930s; Ludwig Ross and Mary Ernestine Bittner) from Bavaria.

The maternal side is earlier immigrant arrivals to the coal mines of Kentucky in the person of the seemingly ominpresent Anglicized Karl Johnson and his frau Adeline Schumert-Hart. Their grandparents were immigrants but not them, they were Kentuckians.

The Great Depression brought them all together in East Saint Louis, Illinois. Karl and his many children (like my grandmother) where part of his minstrel act in Chicago in which they danced and played "hillbilly" for the city slickers. So this is my mother's family. The Ross-Bittner's were "Pop and Meme", my great-grandparents: they spoke German only at home. The Ross-Johnson's (my grandparents) only spoke German to their own parents and at the dinner table.

My paternal side contains some Celt fringes. My father's father's family is from Skye; they are MacKinnons. They, along with many of the other families of Skye and the Hebrides, are originally decended from Norwegian stock and not the Celtic Highlanders of the Scottic Main. There has to be mixing there due to long stading proximity, however, my clan claims Magnus Bearlegs of Norway as their ancestor. His name reappears several times in my family's line. We were deposed and attacked by other clans of the Islands (like those bastards the Mac Donalds and also the Campbells... also bastards :D) and also didn't support the Bruce claims to the throne of Scottia. This side of my family came to America just before the American Revolution. We stayed in our part of Maine until my father came along.

My father's mother's family is Celto-Germanic also. They are the Bryant's from Northern Ireland and England. My son is named for my greatgrand father Thorston Bryant. He played the fiddle and mandolin, also a "hillbilly" from Southern Maine.

I simply identify as "Germanic" as I feel that it best represents my bloodline and my culture. My culture being "Germanic", not "German".

R. Stoffel
Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010, 07:19 AM
I am 1/2 German, a 1/4 Swiss-German, 1/6 Czech(divided equally between Moravia and Bohemia), and 1/12 Slovak. As of late, I have begun investigating which regions within these lands my ancestors are from. There is a possibility that I am more than 3/4 German, as I do not know whether or not my other ancestors were ethnic Germans from the last two countries. Whether or not this is the case I don't really take the potential other blood into account, and define myself as being of German descent.

Matamoros
Sunday, March 28th, 2010, 06:05 AM
I am 7/8 English, 1/8 Swedish. :)

wittwer
Tuesday, August 24th, 2010, 12:50 AM
The Germanic side of me came to the States back in 1848-49. You see my 3 great grandfather happened to be a University student in Aachen and was heavily involved in the Revolution 1848-1849 and somehow managed to get on the Prussian Secret Police list as a person of interest. So he left for Cincinnati Ohio for his health and wellbeing. Other Germanic ties include the Tschudi's of Switzerland who emigrated in the 1720's and the Wittwer's of the Tyrol who emigrated in 1848 and the Laudemann's of Bavaria who emigrated in 1849. All settling in the Cincinnati Area. I also have English and Irish connections as well, these connections go back to the 17th and 18th Centuries. We have been here in North America for a long long time and consider ourselves more American than anything else. ;)

Agramer
Tuesday, August 24th, 2010, 08:09 AM
Austria ^^ Österreichische Deutschentum :D

Schubert
Wednesday, August 25th, 2010, 01:33 AM
Anglo-American is the best label for me. I voted Germanic-American, but there is a small amount of non-Germanic in my blood. Some Italian, but a small amount, and the old photos of my Italian ancestors weren't exactly swarthy. There is also a bit of Irish, but my ancestors from Ireland had Norwegian surnames.

nordfrisk
Wednesday, August 25th, 2010, 03:34 AM
this is actually always a big deal for frisians like me. we are divided amongst 3 nations: nederlands, germany, and denmark. we are a minority threatened to die out and intigrate into mainstream society and we have been almost forced to become something we are not. we are different from the dutch and germans. we are frisians a very distrinct group of people who would make more sense being called danish than german or dutch. for this i call myself frisian or of the scandinavian nordic people

Arditi
Thursday, August 26th, 2010, 02:42 AM
Father is swiss, mother is northern italian/ north-eastern german

Thorwolf
Sunday, August 29th, 2010, 09:27 PM
I voted English, Because My forefathers came to the USA from england.

but if you go trying to trace the origins of my family you will see they are Norse!

Tannhauser
Tuesday, September 21st, 2010, 04:05 AM
My paternal Grandfather was German (Westfalen) his family served as Prussian millitary officers and immigrated following the 1848 revolution and Swedish (Stockholm) . My paternal Grandmother was 100% Norwegian (Rogaland). My maternal Grandfather was German (Rheinland-Pfalz), Swedish (Stockholm) and English (Lincolnshire); while my maternal Grandmother was also German (Rheinland-Pfalz) , Swedish (Göteborg), Dutch - unknown and English (Lincolnshire and Yorkshire).