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View Full Version : Colonist Pioneer Descendants Here?



beowulf wodenson
Friday, January 2nd, 2009, 05:39 PM
I am something of a genealogy buff, have traced my direct paternal ancestry and many other lines besides to English colonists at Jamestown, Virginia,the Carolinas, and Maryland in the 1600's, the Founding stock of this country.
My 12th great grandfather from whom I inherited my surname was a Londoner that settled at Jamestowne in 1622, right after the "King Philip Massacre" of the colonists by the local Powhatan Indians.
Another ancestor of this period apparently served in the early House of Burgesses in Virginia.
Have many other American folk on this board been able to trace their ancestry and roots primarily back to the early colonist settlements?

Loddfafner
Friday, January 2nd, 2009, 06:04 PM
My main lineage goes back to 1640s Connecticut. Side roots lead to the Mayflower and to eighteenth century Pennsylvania.

Veritas ∆quitas
Friday, January 2nd, 2009, 06:21 PM
We've been able to trace our family back to North Carolina, where our family still has Heritage sites standing there today, which has been the place where alot of our family reunions have been held to this day. After North Carolina, we went further north, where we settled in Canada as United Empire Loyalists when the Revolution broke out in exchange for grants of farm land by the King of England, where more Heritage sites were established and are still frequented by family members today, in Upper Canada Village. The exact site of our family farm is featured on the website here (http://www.uppercanadavillage.com/tour15.htm)..

That was, of course, during a time when the German blood in my line was much more potent and pure than it is today, which is to be expected when living in a former colony with a mixture of different European races. Although I do still 'feel' the German-ness in my soul, and am still proud of the ancestry my family has gifted me with, I identify myself much more with the Franco side, which has been where almost all of my breeding has come from in more recent generations, accounting for about 60% of my background.

But yes, my family has been in the U.S during it's foundation (even if we didn't contribute to it after the Revolution) and in pre-confederation period in Canada. So yes, I like to think of myself as a Pioneer descendant with enough sweat and blood in the soil to earn myself a bit land to call my own in this country..

∆meric
Friday, January 2nd, 2009, 06:49 PM
:thumbsup Most of my ancestors were in the US pre-Revolution. I have ancestoral lines going back to 17th century Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New England, New York/New Nethelands, New Sweden/Delaware. My paternal ancestors were among the earliest settlers in New Jersey, Pennsylvania & later Ohio. Some of my ancestors were the first Europeans to settle in Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Netherlands & New Sweden.

beowulf wodenson
Friday, January 2nd, 2009, 07:32 PM
We've been able to trace our family back to North Carolina, where our family still has Heritage sites standing there today, which has been the place where alot of our family reunions have been held to this day. After North Carolina, we went further north, where we settled in Canada as United Empire Loyalists when the Revolution broke out in exchange for grants of farm land by the King of England, where more Heritage sites were established and are still frequented by family members today, in Upper Canada Village. The exact site of our family farm is featured on the website here (http://www.uppercanadavillage.com/tour15.htm)..

That was, of course, during a time when the German blood in my line was much more potent and pure than it is today, which is to be expected when living in a former colony with a mixture of different European races. Although I do still 'feel' the German-ness in my soul, and am still proud of the ancestry my family has gifted me with, I identify myself much more with the Franco side, which has been where almost all of my breeding has come from in more recent generations, accounting for about 60% of my background.

But yes, my family has been in the U.S during it's foundation (even if we didn't contribute to it after the Revolution) and in pre-confederation period in Canada. So yes, I like to think of myself as a Pioneer descendant with enough sweat and blood in the soil to earn myself a bit land to call my own in this country..

My ancestors seem to have been on the Patriot "rebel" side during the War of Independence.
One of them was killed at the battle of Ft. Washington,NY in 1776 serving in a Pennsylvania unit, his son another ancestor also serving in the same regiment.
Another ancestor contributed "Service" to the Patriot cause in North Carolina according to the Daughters of the Revolution.

Veritas ∆quitas
Friday, January 2nd, 2009, 07:45 PM
Another ancestor contributed "Service" to the Patriot cause in North Carolina according to the Daughters of the Revolution.

Aye.. It's quite possible that it was your family that my family was escaping from when this sort of thing broke out, lol. :thumbup

Psychonaut
Friday, January 2nd, 2009, 11:33 PM
Well, my ancestor's weren't the English colonists, but the French, most of whom arrived in the 1500s. Excepting a handful of lines that 'dead end' in the early 1800s, nearly every one of my ancestral lines traces back to those colonists. One of the few non-French lines , goes back definitively to West Virginia. I'm pretty sure that this fellow, William Moore, was a soldier in the Revolution, but since he's got one of the most stereotypical and common Scottish names, it's proving to be impossible to distinguish him from the other dozen William Moores that lived in the same county at the same time. :doh

Angharad
Saturday, January 3rd, 2009, 12:10 AM
Most of my family was here pretty early.

I found one Mayflower ancestor, a lot of New England, including early Maine, Boston, Braintree, Hartford, Salem, Ipswich. There were some town founders in New Jersey, also Jamestown. I have colonial Dutch and German ancestry too.

It sounds like some of us have a lot of the same ancestors. :)

Ulf
Saturday, January 3rd, 2009, 01:08 AM
I've found most of my ancestors came to Pennsylvania around 1720's. Settled in PA and just never left. The farthest I've traced back is to 1650's Switzerland/Southern Germany.

Octothorpe
Sunday, January 4th, 2009, 04:55 PM
My paternal line entered America in the 1640s in the Barnstable, Mass. area. I've several Revolutionary War vets and a vet of the War of 1812 from that bunch. My maternal line is a bit harder to trace, but through one of her grandparents it goes back to the Carters of Virginia. I did take a CC class on tracing one's ancestors this past autumn, and it helped immensely.

Arundel
Thursday, March 5th, 2009, 04:25 AM
I am something of a genealogy buff, have traced my direct paternal ancestry and many other lines besides to English colonists at Jamestown, Virginia,the Carolinas, and Maryland in the 1600's, the Founding stock of this country.
My 12th great grandfather from whom I inherited my surname was a Londoner that settled at Jamestowne in 1622, right after the "King Philip Massacre" of the colonists by the local Powhatan Indians.
Another ancestor of this period apparently served in the early House of Burgesses in Virginia.
Have many other American folk on this board been able to trace their ancestry and roots primarily back to the early colonist settlements?
Like some of you my ancestors came to America in the early 1600's. They were all from England, and they all married English wives. I am descended from the famous William Brewster of the Mayflower & Isaac Allerton also of the Mayflower. My Lawtons helped found Portsmouth, R. I.; my Elder John Crandall was one of the founders of Westerly, R. I. & my ancestor the well known Samuel Gorton founded Warwick, R. I. They seemed to be ambitious people.
Some of my ancestors were killed in King Phillip's war, & I have several Revolutionary soldiers in my lineage. Some of my ancestors were governors & some of the females married governors. Our early Sisson house called Mintwater Brook at Portsmouth, R.I. still stands. It was built by George Sisson before he died in 1715. It had been in the Sisson family until the last few years.
At one time I joined the NEHGS so that I could borrow their wonderful New England books. They were great, and just full of my ancestors.
I decided recently to research their English origins, and it has been very fulfilling and enjoyable. As one man said we learn how we got this way, and I have.
The thing I was most impressed with was recently when I read the Inventory of William Brewster's estate. He owned (300) books. He had attended Cambridge, so he was very well educated.
I am glad to see that someone else is interested in their family history.

michael
Thursday, March 5th, 2009, 06:25 AM
Yep my direct Paternal line "Richard Gregory" arrived 1620 at Jamestown. He lived at Flowerdew Hundred (several spellings) He worked for Governor George Yeardley as head butler. He also survived the Indian uprising there.

Other lines include,William Brewster (1567-1644) Mayflower passanger & senior elder of the Plymouth Colony and also served as an advisor to Governor Bradford.

Numerous other ancestors were not far behind.

I dispute anyone who says I'm not of American stock!!!:thumbup

Allenson
Thursday, March 5th, 2009, 05:16 PM
Yes, another one of us here. Almost exclusively of colonial English/Scots New Englander & Dutch New Netherlands stock. My earliest ancestors ended up landing at what is now Hampton, New Hampshire in the early 1640s as well as quite a few Dutch families from Long Island & the Hudson valley, also in the mid-1600s.

Arundel
Friday, March 6th, 2009, 03:59 AM
Yep my direct Paternal line "Richard Gregory" arrived 1620 at Jamestown. He lived at Flowerdew Hundred (several spellings) He worked for Governor George Yeardley as head butler. He also survived the Indian uprising there.

Other lines include,William Brewster (1567-1644) Mayflower passanger & senior elder of the Plymouth Colony and also served as an advisor to Governor Bradford.

Numerous other ancestors were not far behind.

I dispute anyone who says I'm not of American stock!!!:thumbup

Brewster:
I too am descended from William Brewster. Have you seen the photos of his chair, sword & chest that are now in a museum?

michael
Friday, March 6th, 2009, 04:06 AM
Brewster:
I too am descended from William Brewster. Have you seen the photos of his chair, sword & chest that are now in a museum?


Wow, cool........hi cousin!!

No I haven't seen them as I now live in Oz. Are they on line somewhere??

Blusnayl
Monday, March 23rd, 2009, 09:54 PM
Aye. The folks on my dad's side came over from England in the 1620's as well. Settled in Pennsylvania I believe.

Ragnar Lodbrok
Tuesday, March 24th, 2009, 12:28 AM
my grandmom on my fathers side is descended from Pennsylvania dutch farmers.:thumbup