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Maelstrom
Sunday, December 14th, 2008, 06:27 AM
I've been toying with such a thread for quite a while...

What I want is to compile a list of sayings that are often used by English speaking peoples and see if they are universal Anglophone sayings or rather region specific.

Could everyone please keep to the following format?

New Zealand

"Rattle ya dags!"
Get a move on/hurry up!

"Root me boot!"
Used as an exclamation to denote surprise or wonder.

"A couple of sammies short of a picnic"
Person in question is stupid/retarded.

"Not the full quid"
Person in question is stupid/retarded.

"Bloody tea-leaf!"
Theif.

"...And Bob's your uncle!"
Means that said task will be completed after following previous steps.



I'm sure you folks can type up a few more, just off the top of your heads. No doubt I'll be back all the time as more come to me :D

Soten
Sunday, December 14th, 2008, 06:45 AM
OK. None of those in the first post have I ever heard of.

Problem is I don't know what sayings are specific to Americans or if they are said everywhere (I bet you've heard any sayings that Americans have just through TV and so on anyhow). Here are some silly ones that really aren't that good but came to mind.

USA

"How do you like them apples!"
Essentially a 'in your face' expression. I can only sort of compare it to "put that in your pipe and smoke it!"

"Know what I mean, Jelly bean?"
Ha. It just means 'Know what I mean?' but my mom says it all the time and I think it's weird so there it is.

"blistered/tanked/blitzed/smashed"
Really drunk.

"Outen the lights!"
PA Dutch influenced for "turn off the lights"

"boughten" "I had boughten an apple"
PA Dutch influence: bought

"How goes it?"
I've been curious to see if this is said elsewhere. To me it looks like another PA Dutch rendered English phrase. It would be the literal word for word translation of "Wie geht's?" in German.

OK, the rest are just shots in the dark...I'm not sure if they are said elsewhere, probably they are.

"Sick as a dog"
Really sick.

"Sweating bullets"
Sweating profusely.

"every Tom, Dick, and Harry"
Absolutely everyone.

...Ok, I'd be better off sticking to PA Dutch influenced sayings. I think everyone knows the other ones.

Deary
Sunday, December 14th, 2008, 07:51 AM
Looking up all these brings back so many memories of being with my family. Lots of these I use and I had no idea were distinctly Southern. I especially like how Southerners invented all these ways to avoid saying anything sinful.

Above your raisin
Better than how you were raised (usually used when someone's acting prissy/snobby)

All tore up
Very upset or something in bad condition

Butter my biscuit
You don't say, ain't that something

Crooked as a dog's leg
Someone or something done sneaky, deceitful

Finer than a froghair
Mighty fine

Gooder than grits
Really good

Gone back on your raisin
Denying your roots

Got a hankering for
Got a yearning/wanting for

I declare
Used in response to just about anything

I swan(ee)
Polite way to say "I swear"

If that don't put the pepper in the gumbo
Similar to "If that don't put the icing on the cake."

In a coon's age
In a long while

Losing my religion
Flying off the handle, getting mad

Playing possum
Pretending

Plumb tuckered out
Plumb tired, plain tired, real tired

Rough as a cob
Ugly

That cooks my grits
That makes me mad

Three sheets to the wind
Drunk

Who/what in tarnation
Polite way to say "who/what in damnation" or "who/what in the hell"

Who/what in the Sam Hill
Polite way to say "who/what in the hell"

Psychonaut
Sunday, December 14th, 2008, 10:36 AM
Deary, I find it fascinatingly confounding that although we're from the same city, I did not grow up with most of the sayings you posted.

:scratch

Deary
Sunday, December 14th, 2008, 04:11 PM
I reckon we're just two different kinds of Southerners. My Mamma's from Jacksonville and Milton. My Daddy's side is largely born and raised in Mississippi. His Mamma (my Mammaw) is Scotch-Irish with her parents being from Kentucky. I imagine they're the reason for a lot of the way we talk. I'm really curious now which phrases are not familiar to you :)
Oh, I thought of another one we say a lot around here:

Dag nabbit
Yet another polite way to show that you're mad similar to "dangit" or "darnit"

Ulf
Sunday, December 14th, 2008, 04:26 PM
"How goes it?"
I've been curious to see if this is said elsewhere. To me it looks like another PA Dutch rendered English phrase. It would be the literal word for word translation of "Wie geht's?" in German.

I say this all the time.

I've heard most of these said by my grandfather or I sometimes use them myself.

Make wet? = Is it going to rain?

It's all. = There is no more.

Don't eat yourself full. = Don't fill yourself up.

There's cake back yet. = There is leftover cake stored.

Red up the room. = Clean the room.

It wonders me. = It makes me wonder.

Quit Rutsching = Quit Squirming

Yah, well. = Whatever, or It makes no difference.

Mox nix = irrelevant

Snicklefritz = troublemaker(usually referring to a little kid)

All = None left/All gone

Sigurd
Sunday, December 14th, 2008, 07:48 PM
There's not many that come to my mind at this very moment for up here, but some that I've only heard up here so far would be the following:

Aberdeenshire, Scotland (Doric dialect)

Going Dutch/Gae'in Dutch.
Sharing the cost/expenses of something. Probably not exclusive to the area.

Going to Dundee/Gae'in tae Dundee.
Dundee, for the Aberdonian is a synonym for Hell. It can thus be used either in switching "Hell" for "Dundee" or as a manner-of-speaking when you have a really painstakingly unpleasant task ahead of you.

Oh, aye.
Pretty much, "Talk to the hand 'cause the face ain't listening." Alternatively, "Don't you say!" and "I couldn't care less".

Ha'e a grandad/gran fae Old Meldrum
Being a countryside boy, from humble background, pretty much "I come from a line of hillbillies".

Droon oot the hale hypothec
Spending your last pennies on something.

Causey Mounth
After the same road leading over the Grampian mountains. A road of ill repair, some back-road, the likes...

Louns an quines
"Lads and lasses,..."

Foo's yer doo's? - Aye, peckin'.
Not so oft used in speech, more in writing as a humourous usage. Means, "How are you?" - "Fine." ... "Aye peckin'" as an answer to such questions seems to be more widespread in usage than Foo's yer doo's.

Fit like?
As above. Sometimes answered with "Aye, peckin'".

The Broch
Fraserburgh. Fraserburgh being a place where the dialect gets the worst. Also considered "even more rustic", if you say you're from The Broch, people'll take two steps back immediately for your unmannered, rustic, rough townsmanship way up north there. ;)

He's a heid case.
A bit of a nutter, a mental/crazy person. The further south you get, the more it is used.

Widden jacket
Well - a coffin, what else? :D More used "up north", the closer you get to the Moray Firth that is.

And so on and so forth. I shall be keeping my ears open as to the countryside boys in my flat using any distinctive ones only used in the area.

Will follow up with more, anyhow :P

Soten
Sunday, December 14th, 2008, 10:18 PM
I say this all the time.

Red up the room. = Clean the room.


I am so glad you posted that, I nearly forgot. My step-dad who is PA Dutch says "Red up the room!" all the time. We make fun of him so much for that. Get the room ready I suppose is what it means?

I recognize all of the ones you posted, I'll have to think of more. Usually. if I say them or if someone else does I don't catch it because I'm so used to it.

"Quit rutschin' around" is another favorite.

Scott Wodenson
Sunday, December 14th, 2008, 10:48 PM
Appalachian English

Oh boy I've got a few, I guess you all can say hello to your forum Hillbilly :)

These terms and words come from the Appalachian Mountains

I'm going to post this link because I really do not want to have to type the entire origin of this version of American English out LOL

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_English

a'fixin - I'm a'fixin to do it.
agin - again
a'hint - behind
aigs - eggs
aiming - planning (I was aiming to come over.)
ain't - isn't
air - there (Hits over air.)
airy - none (I ain't seen airy one.)
all - oil (Gotta change the all in my car.)
antigogglin - out of alignment. (That whole thang is sittin' antigogglin.)
arn - Iron
arre - arrow
arsh taters - Irish potatoes
aspel - a spell, a while (Sit down an rest aspel.)

bag - beg
bakerds - backward
bank - Prepare the far in the stove at night, sos ittle be ready next mornin
bait - portion of food, as in: "I ate my bait in turnip greens."
bananer (nanner) puddin - banana pudding
bar ditch - borrow ditch
bard - borrowed
benz - because, since (Benz you're going, I'll go with you.)
biled - boiled
blackguard - using foul language (He blackguarded in front of my wife.)
bloomers - ladies underwear
bobbed - cut hair
bob war - barbed wire
bout - near
brang - bring
breeches - pants/slacks
brekfurst - breakfast
bresh - brush/wood
brought up - raised (She was brought up right.)
brow - edge or clift of a mountain.
bub - light bulb

carried - took. I carried him to town.
Casners - Caster Knott
caty wompus - mountain term originally: a vicious beast; now: unlevel or crooked.
cematary - cemetery
chamber pot/slop jar - the inside facility
chap - child
cheer - chair
chimley- chimney
chillan - children
churn - A wooden or pottery receptacle for making butter.
Chusday - Tuesday
cityfied - raised in the city
clean - exactly (I clean forgot.)
clear tuh - She had to go clear tuh the spring fer her warsh water.
close pin - used fer hangen up yore clothes on the close line.
clum, clumedb - climbed
cole - cold
countryfied - raised in the country
coveren' - (You'll be sick fer not coveren' up.)
cussin' - cursing

davenport - couch, sofa
didgee?/didjew? - did you?
dingy - dirty
dipper - A ladel for drinking water out of a water bucket. (sometimes a goard)
dish rag - dish cloth/towel
disk har - harrow
dope - Coca Cola (initially contained a small amount of cocaine)
dreckly - directly (I'll be there dreckly.)
dreen - drain (Dreen the grease offen it.)
duddon/dutton - doesn't

edjukated - talken like a northner.
em - them (How many of em are left?)
errol - TV or radio antenna
et (1) - ate
et (2) - it

failing - feeling (I ain't failing so good.)
fanger - finger (How'd ja hurt cha fanger?)
far - fire
fard - fired
farn - foreign
farplace - fireplace
fer - for (What fer?)
fetch - bring
fixin' to - about to
fla'r - flower
foard - forwardBR> forners - foreigners, them folks from up North. See 'up North'.
fraidy holes - storm cellars
fretten - upset (The baby is fretten.)
furriners - foreigners
futher - farther

galluses - suspenders
giddup - get up
gitten - going
git shed of - get rid of (Wish I could get shed of this cold.)
gizzy-whiz - thing (The problem is, that gizzy-whiz is broke)
gonna - going to
gooden (un) - good day (Have a gooden.)
gorsh - gosh
grass widow - divorced woman
grine - groin
grow'd up - grown
gummit - government (she got one of them thar gummit jobs)

haint (1) - haven't (I haint seen him.)
haint (2) - ghost
hankerin - want (I'm hankerin' fer som ice cream.)
har - hair (I aint seen hide nor har of him.)
hard - hired
heared - (I ain't heared from him.)
heavy dew - request for action (Kin I haavy dew me a favor?)
helpen - serving (I'll take a helpen of them taters.)
hep - help
hern - hers
hidee - hello
hidrun - water faucet
hi-fluoot'n - Someone who is real important.
hillbilly - someone from the hills/backwoods
hipping - diaper
his'n - his
hit - it (Hits afixin' ta rain.)
Ho'ard - Howard
hockey - Something to avoid stepping in.
hoecake - originally, corn mix cooked on a hoe on the open fire
holler (1) - hollow, arable land between mountains (He lived up in the holler.)
holler (2) - yell
holpen - hope to
holt - he grabbed a holt of the fence
hongry - hungry
hope - help (I hope him plow the field.)
horspitle - hospital
hoverhalls - overalls
howsa - how about (Howsa 'bout going with me?)
hursh - hush
hurt'n - hurting (He was really hurtn'n.)

idear - idea
if'n - (I'll com if'n I can.)
ignert - ignorant
ittle - it will (Ittle be a col day tamarrow.

jaw - talk
Jawjuh - Georgia
jew here - Did jew-here about....?
jine - join (Mind if'n I jine ye.)
jest - just (Jest a minute.)
joshin' - joking (Anna was joshin' me.)
karn- rotting flesh
keer - care (I don't keer.)
ketch - catch
kilt - killed (Paw kilt a rabbit.)
kittle - kettle
kiver up - cover up

lak - alike
left off - dropped off (Eddie left me off at the station.)
lent - leaned (Alfred lent the hoe against the shed.)
liberry - library
liddey biddy - small (She's a liddey biddy thang.)
lidel - little (Lidel ol' me.)
light - window pane
likeness - photo
likken - a whuppen
likker - liquor
lite bread - sandwitch bread

mansion - mention Don't mansion it.
mansion house - home
mater - tomato
mere - mirror
mightly - very much
minners - minnows
mitenear - almost
Miz - Miss, Mizrus, Mrs.
munts - months

nable - navel
nar - narrow
naw - no
ner drownt- almost drowned
nigh - (It's ben nigh o'er a yar since we last heard of him.)
northner - Norterner
nuttin - nothing
nye way - short cut

offen - often
of'n - Git of'n that cheer.
ooshie - Ooshie it is cole.
outhouse - toilet
overhauls - overalls

pallet - bed made on the floor
passel - a bunch
period - men. cycle
pert nigh - nearly
petticoat - ladies slip
pianner - piano
piles - hemorrhoids
piller - pillow
piller slip - pillow case
pitcher - picture (She's pretty as a pitcher.)
play purty - toy That kid needs a new play purty.
plum tard - very tired
poke - a paper bag, a traveling bag
pokesalet - poke salad (wild greens, par boil, cook down and add scrambled eggs. Some think pokesalet is poisonous if you don't boil and discard the water a couple of times. I've seen it coming up between the cracks in concrete in a large city).
polecat - skunk
pore - underweight, pitiful, no money
porehouse - poorhouse
Poseys - Flowers
pot likker - Liquor from cooking turnip greens.
privates - (censored)
puppet - pulpit
purtnear - pretty near, almost, close, soon
purty - pretty

quair - strange (She acted mighty quair.)
quarl lar - coal oil (Quarl lar is good fer bee stings.) Don says that coal oil is oil processed from coal, used in table lamps before electricity and sold at the grocery store. Kerosene, later used, was a petroleum product and sold at the 'fillin station'.
quarled up - coiled

ranch - wrench
rang- ring
raring - anxious (He's raring to go.)
rat - right Get in here rat now!
recollect - remember (I don't rightly recollect.)
reckon - believe
rench - rinse (Rench them dishes good.)
rernt - ruined (The milk was rernt.)
retard - retired
rightly - correctly

sa - so
salary - celery
sang - sing
sanger - Singer (sewing machine)
scrub - to wash hard, i.e., scrub your close, scrub the child's face
seed - seen (I seed him up at hisen house yesterde.)
set - sit
setch - such (Patty said that she'd never heared of setch a thang.)
shar - shower
shet - shut (Shet yore sassy mouth.)
shinny - climb
shoot - to express disappointment
shore'nuf - surely is; as a question: Ain't that right?
Shovel - Shelbyville, TN
shurf - sheriff
shut of (1) or shuta - should have
shut of (2) - shed of, rid of
shut off -turn off
skeered - scared (He's even skeered of his own shadow.)
slop jar - chamber pot/the inside facility
snort - a drag from the corn likker jar
sodt - soda
sparkin' - dating
spenders - suspenders
spit can - a tin can used for spitting tobacco juice
sprang - spring
sprednadder - Spredding adder
squarsh - squash
stob - piece of wood. He stomped his toe on that stob in the yard.
stoop - step (He sat on the front stoop of the house.)
stoppit - stop
strang - string
sum'en - something (Sum'en tells me this is wrong.)
summers - somewhere


taday - today
tamarrow - tomorrow
tar - tire
tard - tired
tater - potato
tetched - crazy
thang - thing (Don't brang that thang in the house.)
thank - think (I'm sa tard I can't thank.)
this here - (Git into this here house, right now.)
this'n - this (Not that'n, this'n.)
th'other/tother - the other (It was or the tother.)
thow - throw
tolerable - fairly good (I'm tolerable well.)
touch - have relationship with (Girl, did he touch you?)
tuckered out - very tired
tump over - turn over

up North - anyplace other than AL, AR, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, TX, VA
ust - use to, once (He ust ta come mor offen.)

waller - mess up (Brittany, don't waller on that bed.)
war - wire
warhouse - warehouse
warsh - wash
warsh board - a wood framed board with grooved metel ust to scrub yore close.
warsh rag - wash cloth
warter - water
warter bucket - a bucket with a dipper to drink water.
wasper - wasp
whar - where
weuns - we
whilst - while (Hold that steer down whilst I brand'em.)
wheelborrow - wheelbarrow
whomperjawed - out of alignment
whup/whuppen - whip/wipping/likken (I'll whup you good!)
widder - widow
winder - window
winder light - window pane
winner - winter
woodna - wouldn't have
woods colt - ain't got no nown daddy
wrung out - git the water all out of the clothes
wuz - was

ya - hi-fluoot'n for ye (What are ya adoing?)
y'all - you all; all of you (Y'all come back, ya hear.)
ye - you
yeself - your self
years - ears
yep/yeah - yes
yers - yours (Is this yers?)
yeself - yourself
yesterde - yesterday
yonder - in another room (Brandons in yonder.)
yore - your (War is yore hat?)
youngen - young one
you'nses - all of y'all
Yurp - Europe

And now for some phrases

A fine kittle of fish. What a mess.
Backed an envelope - addressed an envelope
Bleeding like a stuck hog - bleeding profusely
Caliption fit - very angry
Consarn hit - Something didn't work right
Dutton that tear you for a duster? - Doesn't that jest get you / blow your mind?
Fer git hit. Forget it.
Good Book - The Bible
Grinnin like a mule eating briars - big smile
Great day in the morning - surprised
He couldn't hit the side of a barn. - doesn't have good aim
He'd do it if it hair-lipped the Governor. do it irregardless
He's old as the hills. - very old
He was mad as a hornet. very upset
Heck far/ shoot far - disgusted
He really got his nose out of joint. - got his feelings hurt
He's rotten to the core. - completely bad
He's sum'un over 40 odd yars old. - approximate years
Hits hotteren blue blazes
Hit doesn't mean doodley squat. - nothing
Hit beats the heck out of me. - doesn't know why.
Hit was catty cornered. - diagonally across
Hits caty-wompus. - out of alignment, crooked
I ain't heard nor tell of him in yars. - haven't heard from him
I ain't seed hide nor hair of him - hasn't seen.
I'd better be gitten. better be going.
I don't keer. - care, yes: Would you like some potatoes? I don't keer.
I laughed so hard I liked to have died. - just too much
I picked a right smart of beans. A good many
I'll be durn. - surprised
I liked to have never figured it out. - difficult
If that don't take the cake. - kinda disgusted or surprised
I'm drunker than Cootie Brown. - dizzy
I'm much obliged to ye. - thank you
I'm fit as a fiddle. - fine
I'm so tard I can't see straight - very tired.
I'm as tard ad far 'n twice as hot - very tired
I'm jest plum tuckered out
I'm gonna clean your plow.- threat of bodily harm
I've ben fair to middling / tolerbly well. - answer to, how are you?
I've ben arning all day - ironing
Jest a cotten picken minute. - halting someone's remarks.
Kocsis Army - a lot of anything
Lay over to catch meddlers - Response to a nosey child asking "What is?/Why?
Like a bunch of hogs running around with sticks in their mouths. - gonna be a cold winner
Like as not, I'll be agoen. I'm pretty sure I'll go.
Meaner than a snake - very mean
Pearl was raised up pore. - reared
Scares the living daylights out of me - very scared
Scat,skit, skat Kitty-Kat Your tails on fire - answers to a sneeze.
Set down an be quite - antiquated command to children [grin]
She's got a face that would stop an eight day clock.
She looks like death eatin' a cracker. - pale
She was fit to be tied. - very irritated
She wudna missed a hog killing. - This woman had to be involved in everything.
Taken one day at a time. Answer to "How are ye?"
That's funnier than when granny caught her tits in the wringer - very funny.
They come from 'cross the waters. - overseas
They lived so far back in the woods they had to pipe sunshine into them.
Thing-a-ma-jig - for lack of a better word for something.
You ain't ah jest whistling Dixie - the truth of something.
Were you born in a barn? - left the door open
Well, I ain't never. - surprised
Well, I swan! - surprised
What'n the Sam Hill? - puzzled
Ye jist ain't whistlin Dixie
You'll ketch your death of cold. - not coveren' up
You're jest making a mountain out of a mole hill. - exaggerated

Bite yore tongue!
Consarn it!
Dad blame!
Dad bum it! (mild expletive for dad burn it)
Dad burn it!
Dag nab it!
Dog gone it!
Fiddle-sticks
Good gosh!
Gosh almighty!
I declare!
I'll be diddly dad burn!
I'll swear!
Land agoshen!
Land's sake!
Of all things!
Oh, my goodness gracious!
Shoot far!
Shulks!

Fer youens cityfied folks who jest don't no no better, these are the right vittle times fer the day: Brekfurst is fer eating furst thang in the mornin'. When the sun is bout mid hi an the dinner bell rangs, than ye eat yer dinner. Rite 'bout dark, ye eat yer supper.

If'n someone asks you if you want something, and you do, say: "I don't mind if'n I do," or "I don't keer."
If'n yore in the woods, makes lotsa noise so the 'stillers will no you ain't the revenoors.
If'n you go to someones house, whistle or sum'en sos theys nose yore comin'. You ken holler, "Is anyone ta home?"


That is it I promise :D
I Hope the post wasn't to long or to much of a headache.

Psychonaut
Sunday, December 14th, 2008, 10:55 PM
I reckon we're just two different kinds of Southerners. My Mamma's from Jacksonville and Milton. My Daddy's side is largely born and raised in Mississippi. His Mamma (my Mammaw) is Scotch-Irish with her parents being from Kentucky. I imagine they're the reason for a lot of the way we talk. I'm really curious now which phrases are not familiar to you :)

You're right, this must just be a case of differing ancestries affecting our speech. Looking over the list, I can honestly say that I'm unfamiliar with:



Rough as a cob

Losing my religion

Gone back on your raisin

Gooder than grits

Finer than a froghair

Crooked as a dog's leg

Above your raisin


I've definitely heard all of the others, but these are all new to me.

Soten
Sunday, December 14th, 2008, 11:52 PM
I looked up some PA Dutch sayings and these are the ones I am most familiar with. I see nothing weird about most of these sayings. A few even surprise me, if they really are confined to just being PA Dutch. The sayings are in quotes and I'll explain them below if they do not already have the explanation inside the quotes.



"When you come over - come out"
"come out" in this case means "stop by" or "drop in" - It makes more sense when said by someone who lives out on a farm or out in the woods. I have a feeling it's not just PA Dutch.


Do you happen to have a directory of Harrisburg AROUND?
"around" meaning "around here somewhere" - again doesn't strike me as weird, and is probably not just PA Dutch.


When I stood up on the platform to make a speech I got so BEFUDDLED (mixed-up; excited; unable to think).


He BLABS (tells) everything he hears.
The verb is "to blabber".


You've got the darn thing all BOOGHERED-UP. (mixed ,damaged).


My nose itches like a BUGGER (meaning a tickling, annoying feeling)
I know the explanation is there already but I think a "Bugger" is more along the lines of "Something that bugs you" "annoys"


You'll get my DANDER (spunk) worked up; then LOOK OUT.
I hope this is known to most people - I think it's more Southern.


If you don't get away from under my window with your darn loud talking, I'll DOUSE you with the pot water!
Haha, "douse" means "to soak". I suppose it might be PA Dutch.


MAKE an egg for my supper.
This one has to be more widely known. "Make" just means "cook" in this instance.


I hear them people live OVER BY the ridge.
I suppose the position of "over" and "by" is a little odd, but it is referring both to the place being "near (by)" something and "over" meaning "yonder" or "across a distance". Doesn't seem odd to me at all.


UN-BEKNOWNST to her, I snuck up to her, and gave her a big hug and kiss.
"unknown"


A WEENY (tiny) bit is better than none, ain't it?


If you don't behave you'll get a good WHACK (sharp slap).


I'd SOONER (rather) not have it.
I would usually use this in a sense to show the "soon"-ness of it. More readily. "I would sooner kiss a cow than that girl.'


Well, you can MAKE ON as IF you knew something.
"pretend" "put up the appearance that..."

Loddfafner
Sunday, December 14th, 2008, 11:53 PM
"Lazier than the second coming of Christ" - from an elderly cousin in Nevada.

Deary
Monday, December 15th, 2008, 12:02 AM
Appalachian English

Oh boy I've got a few, I guess you all can say hello to your forum Hillbilly :)

These terms and words come from the Appalachian Mountains

I'm going to post this link because I really do not want to have to type the entire origin of this version of American English out LOL

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_English

It saddens me a bit to read that list because many of those words were a regular part of my vocabulary when I was younger. They aren't so much now because when I went to elementary school the other students would make fun of me, and to avoid being looked down upon, I started changing my English to theirs. My teachers would also give me hell about it because my writing how I talk was, at one point, affecting my grades. I still can't understand what's wrong with the way I spoke and speak. It all sounds correct to me.

Here's some of the ones I most recognize and use:
a'fixin (I tend to put "a" in front of a number of verbs)
ain't
brang ("brung" for me)
breeches ("britches" for me)
brought up
clean
clum, clumbed
cussin' (People told me this was wrong and I should say "cursing" instead)
fixin' to (Someone not long ago told me this didn't make sense)
fretten
gitten
gooden
grass widow
galluses
grow'd up (Everytime I visit my family they tell me how growed up I am :D)
haint (I recognize this one because in the South we have something called haint paint that's a pretty blue color used on a lot of doors to keep the ghosts away)
heared
hit
helpen
hidee
holler
holpen
hoverhalls (We always called them hoveralls or coveralls)
howsa
hursh
idear
if'n
ignert
jew here
jine
joshin' (People told me I should say "joking" instead)
kilt
lent
liberry
likken
nigh
offen (Recently, we had a discussion in one of my classes about how people pronounce this word and everyone thought I was weird for not pronouncing the "t")
pot likker
purty
quarled up
recollect
rightly
sanger
shoot
shore'nuf
skeered
thang
this here (along with "that there" :D)
warsh
whilst
woodna
youngen
you'nses

Maelstrom
Monday, December 15th, 2008, 12:23 AM
New Zealand

Cocky/Cockie
-A farmer

Bugger
-Used as a part of a sentence or as a stand-alone word. "Bugger!" or "Bugger me!" would denote surprise. "That's a bugger..." would be said to express a bit of disappointment about the given situation etc. "That's the bugger!" equates to something like "Yeah, that's right/ that's how it's done" or "Yes, that's him/her".

Bach
-Pronounced "Batch", is a NZ English term for a (traditionally) small house generally in an isolated location. The term stems from "Bachelor", upholding the belief that a bachelor does not need a large, elaborate house because he has no family. Today, the term "Bach" is commonly used by people to mean holiday home. There are many Baches where I live that are owned by city-folk who want to get away from all of the hustle and bustle.

Get off the grass!
-Used as a phrase to express disbelief. Sort of like "Get real".



Some of the words that Deary stated are in use over here. I had never thought them foreign at all :-O "Joshin'" is a prime example. My Mam says it all the time!

SwordOfTheVistula
Monday, December 15th, 2008, 03:10 AM
I think "going Dutch", "head case", and "how goes it" are pretty universal.

Some in my area (New England) that don't appear universal and remain in common use:

"I'm all set"="No thanks", said to reject an offer, for example of a drink. Generally this also means "conversation ended" if offering something to a stranger.

"Wicked"="Extremely". "Wicked good", "Wicked pissah" (Extremely bad), "Wicked sick" (Extremely good). "Mad" is used the same way in the NYC area.

Soten
Monday, December 15th, 2008, 03:34 AM
Some in my area (New England) that don't appear universal and remain in common use:

"I'm all set"="No thanks", said to reject an offer, for example of a drink. Generally this also means "conversation ended" if offering something to a stranger.

"Wicked"="Extremely". "Wicked good", "Wicked pissah" (Extremely bad), "Wicked sick" (Extremely good). "Mad" is used the same way in the NYC area.

Every one of those is common place in PA and everywhere else in the states I've been (which is not much, so). Except for "wicked pissah", that's just silly.

In another post recently, I even said "I think Hauke Haien's new avatar is wicked."

Anfang
Monday, December 15th, 2008, 04:09 AM
Little used anymore but I use it.
"Humdinger"-
One that is extraordinary or remarkable: a humdinger of a blizzard.

possibly related to old Norse "dengjar" to hammer an anvil. something like :
"clang!" wich would be related to ding-dong as in a bell.

"clang! is less used in America now also.

Hauke Haien
Monday, December 15th, 2008, 04:56 AM
My step-dad who is PA Dutch says "Red up the room!" all the time. We make fun of him so much for that. Get the room ready I suppose is what it means?
It looks to me like it may be derived from "aufräumen", to tidy up.

Räum das Zimmer auf
Räum auf das Zimmer
Räum up the room
Red up the room

I have no idea whether this fits linguistically.

Anfang
Monday, December 15th, 2008, 05:11 AM
It looks to me like it may be derived from "aufräumen", to tidy up.

Räum das Zimmer auf
Räum auf das Zimmer
Räum up the room
Red up the room

I have no idea whether this fits linguistically.


In NE Iowa ,In the predominantly German countryside, they say:

"can you do that yet?"

I am sure it is from Jetzt.

Dreyrithoka
Monday, December 15th, 2008, 05:03 PM
Cockney (http://www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk/) - A Peckham dialect. :thumbup

Barring that, 'twouldst merely be a garbled mess of local expressions such as "chode" and the like, which art all far too recent to be considered "folk sayings" as of yet...

Berrocscir
Monday, December 15th, 2008, 05:24 PM
Here's some from Southern England, don't know a lot of northern speak, they're funny up there ;):

I could eat a scabby cat - ravenously hungry

That's as old as the hills - very old

When Adam was a lad - a long time ago

I've been right round the Wreakin - spent a long time & much effort trying to find something or someone - the Wreakin is a large hill in Shropshire, England.

Oh my giddy aunt - general phrase of disbelief or suprise

Gordon Bennet! - ditto!

There are loads more, my mind's gone blank!

Hersir
Monday, December 15th, 2008, 05:45 PM
http://oaks.nvg.org/havamal.html :thumbup

Soten
Monday, December 15th, 2008, 06:06 PM
That's as old as the hills - very old


We have that one here too. We also have old as dirt with the same meaning.

My uncle and one cousin were once driving by this very elderly woman's house and explained that the lady had been living there for what seemed like a century. They both laughed and said she was as "old as dirt". The old lady died the next day and now they don't use that phrase anymore. HAHA.

Anfang
Monday, December 15th, 2008, 06:11 PM
We have that one here too. We also have old as dirt with the same meaning.

Here in NY we use "Thats' as old as the hills" too.

I knew an old redneck lady who used to say, "Im sweatin like a Nigger at election" time when she was sweaty from work.

[QUOTE]My uncle and one cousin were once driving by this very elderly woman's house and explained that the lady had been living there for what seemed like a century. They both laughed and said she was as "old as dirt". The old lady died the next day and now they don't use that phrase anymore. HAHA.

Ha ha ha? poor lady....you witches.

Oh and here "I am so hungry I could eat a horse"

" he gets more girls than you can shake a stick at"

"owe to each saint a candle"

"the only good indian is a dead indian" -William tecumseh Sherman and used widely.

"Don't be a Jew" dont be cheap.

"he tried to jew Me down"(he tried to lower my price.

Liar liar pants on fire.

Hersir
Monday, December 15th, 2008, 08:58 PM
"Mye vil ha mer, Tykje vil ha fler" - If you got alot, you want more, and the Devil alway's want's soul's

"Selg ikke skinnet før bjørnen er skutt" - Dont sell the fur before the bear is killed.

"Havet er en god arbeidsgiver, men hun er nådeløs" - The ocean offer alot of riches, but she is merciless.

"Det e itjnå som kjæm te sæ sjøl" - If you dont make a effort, nothing will come from it"

"Når øllet går inn, så går vettet ut" - When the beer goes in, the wit goes out

SwordOfTheVistula
Monday, December 15th, 2008, 08:59 PM
We have that one here too. We also have old as dirt with the same meaning.

Here in NY we use "Thats' as old as the hills" too.

I knew an old redneck lady who used to say, "Im sweatin like a Nigger at election" time when she was sweaty from work.



Ha ha ha? poor lady....you witches.

Oh and here "I am so hungry I could eat a horse"

" he gets more girls than you can shake a stick at"

"owe to each saint a candle"

"the only good indian is a dead indian" -William tecumseh Sherman and used widely.

"Don't be a Jew" dont be cheap.

"he tried to jew Me down"(he tried to lower my price.

Liar liar pants on fire.

I didn't hear most of those when I lived in NY except from older people. Other than 'old as dirt' and 'jew someone down', even these last two are not that common anymore.

Soten
Monday, December 15th, 2008, 11:14 PM
I talked to my mom and we had a good time thinking about all the things that we think are common place sayings and words that are really peculiar to PA Dutch. She told me her grandfather used to say this all the time:

Throw me down the stairs my hat!
Throw my hat down the stairs to me.

A lot of this stuff has to do with word order. It's a sentence using all English words but that has somehow been influenced by German word order.

Today I looked in the mirror and said to myself:

I am all out of it lookin'

I'm really looking out of it.


Putting the first verb in the second word place and the second verb at the end is a sure recipe for PA Dutch/German.

Ulf
Tuesday, December 16th, 2008, 02:06 AM
I found these on the internet, but they sound normal to me, probably Soten as well.

Throw the cow over the fence some hay.

A big wife and a big barn never did any man harm.

We get too soon old and too late smart.

Children and fools tell the truth.

Kissing wears out, cooking don't.

Short hair is quickly brushed.

An industrious wife is the best savings account.

Go out and tie the dog loose and don’t forget to outen the light.

This expression uses convoluted grammar in addition to “Germanic” verbalizations. Here the verb “outen” means “to turn out”. The adjective and noun are used in reverse order from other forms of Standard English.

The owner says he’ll pay me ten dollars a day if I eat myself, but just five dollars if he eats me.

Explanation: No, there’s no cannibalism here! The worker will get ten dollars a day for providing his own meals, but five dollars a day if the owner has to provide the worker’s food.

He’s a pretty good man yet, ain’t not?
Explanation: He’s a pretty good man (provider), isn’t he? (a tag question form)

If you don’t speak “Pennsylvania Dutch” in one of its multiple forms, they just might say of you: “You don’t make yourself out so good. You talk so fancy like a body can’t understand you.”

A funny story about my grandfather:

My brother killed some squirrels and was going to cook them up. They skinned them and put them in some water and my grandfather told my brother to get some salt to put in the water. My brother is a bit... slow (not retarded, just funny..) so he grabbed some seasoning salt, and my grandfather said, "No, don't you have any reklar salt?" My brother turns and says "What's reklar salt?"

:blueroll:

Although if you haven't heard the PA Dutch accent you may not get it... :D

Maelstrom
Tuesday, December 16th, 2008, 06:38 AM
I was sitting at work, bored today. Something came up and I exclaimed "Well, you've got the bloody life of Riley haven't ya?"

It then came about that the two people I was at the time had no idea what I was saying, even though both are NZers born and bred! I appealed to my duty manager and asked him if he'd heard of it - he had!

The phrase is question means that someone has a lavish lifestyle or has it "easy", especially in comparison to the one that is saying it. Often my parents would tell me that in a joking way.

Zimobog
Tuesday, December 16th, 2008, 07:16 AM
I spent my early years and high school in the FL panhandle. I heard a variation of Deary's

"fine as frog hair split four ways"

or

"fair as frog hair"

or the expressions

"that looks like a dog shit and drug his hind leg thru it"

"that's as wrong as two boys kissing in the back of a cadallic"

or was that just my father who said that stuff? :D

SwordOfTheVistula
Tuesday, December 16th, 2008, 06:11 PM
I was sitting at work, bored today. Something came up and I exclaimed "Well, you've got the bloody life of Riley haven't ya?"

It then came about that the two people I was at the time had no idea what I was saying, even though both are NZers born and bred! I appealed to my duty manager and asked him if he'd heard of it - he had!

The phrase is question means that someone has a lavish lifestyle or has it "easy", especially in comparison to the one that is saying it. Often my parents would tell me that in a joking way.

We have/had that here too, it was a common phrase in the past but not anymore.