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Deary
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 04:45 PM
Should adultery be treated as a crime?
Would be it be possible to legally accuse persons of adultery?
If adultery should be a crime, what should be the punishment and who should be found guilty?
Would making adultery a crime further destroy families and society or help to save them?

Ęmeric
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 05:21 PM
Adultery was a crime (and maybe still is) according to the Military Code of Conduct. Realistically, the way it was applied was if both persons were members of the military (one or both married) or if a member of the Armed Forces had relations with the spouse of another service member. The purpose was & is to maintain order & discipline within the ranks. Having relations with "hostesses" in Subic Bay or Pattya Beach was overlooked. ;) Edit: I'd like to point out I was not married during my military service.

As for civilians it should be a crime if it results in pregnancy & someone is stuck with the legal responsibility of raising a child that is not his. And there should be civil penalties as will. This is the case in North Carolina were a woman sued the other woman who brokeup her marriage.

Ulf
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 05:22 PM
Breach of contract.

Grimm
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 06:18 PM
Should adultery be treated as a crime?


Adultery is still a crime in certain jurisdictions (New York state for instance). Disregarding the true spirit of the question for now, adultery is worth keeping on the books if only for its usefulness to law enforcement. It's one of several statutes that police can fall back on to detain people whom they actually suspect of a far worse crime. It's one of those little laws that can come in handy for law enforcement.

Psychonaut
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 07:10 PM
Adultery was a crime (and maybe still is) according to the Military Code of Conduct.

Oh it's still a crime for us. One of the guys I went to AIT with got in serious trouble (loss of rank/pay) for adultery.

Loki
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 08:27 PM
Should adultery be treated as a crime?
Would be it be possible to legally accuse persons of adultery?
If adultery should be a crime, what should be the punishment and who should be found guilty?
Would making adultery a crime further destroy families and society or help to save them?

It's a crime in countries like Saudi Arabia. We don't want to go down that path. It's not a nice thing, and a breach of trust, but shouldn't be treated as a crime. The law is already pervasive enough in our lives.

Resurgam
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 09:19 PM
It is a crime that deserves capital punishment.

Loki
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 09:24 PM
It is a crime that deserves capital punishment.

If this was enacted, the churches in America would be empty, as there would hardly be anyone left alive. ;)

IvyLeaguer
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 09:41 PM
Adultery among the chosen race should not be considered a crime. The mother should be able to freely choose the father of her children. I believe it is the "quality" of the father she chooses that really matters. If the best choice is already married then this should be allowed anyway. Rassenschande is what should be illegal.

Polygamy should be legalized. However, I do think that certain individuals should also be sterilized.

IvyLeaguer
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 09:46 PM
I keep trying to write "R-A-S-S-E-N-S-C-H-A-N-D-E" but the computer I'm on keeps automatically changing the word to "rassenvermischung." Strange!

Resurgam
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 10:54 PM
Polygamy should be legalized.

Do you mean polygyny or polygamy in general?

Loki:

If this was enacted, the churches in America would be empty, as there would hardly be anyone left alive.

Most white churches would only have their membership rolls reduced a bit. All of the black churches would be completely wiped out, however.

Capital punishment would be the maximum punishment meaning that the sentence would be up to that point. Mercy from the maximum punishment would be given with repentence from the guilty party.

Puritan law in colonial New England:
http://thehistoryprofessor.com/Sexual%20Deviance%20in%20Colonial%20Amer ica_files/image002.jpg

IvyLeaguer
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 10:57 PM
Polygamy should be legalized and polygyny should be allowed, but only for certain individuals.

Loki
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 11:08 PM
Most white churches would only have their membership rolls reduced a bit. All of the black churches would be completely wiped out, however.


This does not make sense from an evolutionary perspective though. White America is already going downhill demographically, how will you guys be able to compete with the rest of the world then, rapidly increasing? Punishing your own gene pool for religious-sensitive "crimes" is exactly the kind of thinking that displays Christianity's self-destructive nature.

Ęmeric
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 11:25 PM
Isn't it considered treason in Britain to commit adultery with the Queen or the Princess of Wales? This came up several years ago in regards to Princess Diana & James Hewitt.

Resurgam
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 11:42 PM
Punishing your own gene pool for religious-sensitive "crimes" is exactly the kind of thinking that displays Christianity's self-destructive nature.


It is not accurate to label adultery as a "religious-sensitive crime" within Christianity. The ancient Germanic peoples treated it as a crime punishable by death (according to Tacitus) along with many other cultures of the world.

Loki
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 11:50 PM
It is not accurate to label adultery as a "religious-sensitive crime" within Christianity. The ancient Germanic peoples treated it as a crime punishable by death (according to Tacitus) along with many other cultures of the world.

The ancient Germanic peoples also did human sacrifices (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_sacrifice#Germanic_peoples) from time to time. We have moved on from there -- it is 2,000 years later.

What is next? Chopping thieves' hands off? These things make for nice hard rhetoric, but in practice will never work in any modern Germanic society. Germanic people today are civilized, unlike others who still practice these kind of laws, like in Saudi Arabia.

Sigurd
Thursday, November 6th, 2008, 11:53 PM
Adultery currently is a reason for divorce in Scotland, and if it is proven that adultery existed, the marriage can be dissolved, and evidently the adulterer/adulteress will come out much worse out of the divorce settlement, as they are taken to have caused it. That should be enough punishment per se.

There are currently two defences to adultery in Scots Law, them being Lenocinium and Condonation.

Lenocinium exists when the adultery was actively abetted/caused by the other spouse. Examples that would count as lenocinium, is if the husband writes letters to his wife that she should do something to enable him to divorce her (Gallagher v Gallagher, case of 1928). The court held in this case, it could be taken that she had indulged in an affair with her paramour as a result of these letter, divorce was denied. Divorce was however granted when he sought to file for divorce once more six years later (Gallagher v Gallagher, case of 1934), since her continued adultery was no longer to be taken as a result of the letters. Another example of lenocinium would be if you locked your wife out and told her she should "prostitute herself in the street for a place in the night", and she follows your invitation.

Condonation has taken place, when at the the end of a three month period of finding out about the adultery, the spouses are still cohabiting. If the non-guilty spouse continues to cohabit for only two months, it is not condoned as long as she moves out before the 3-month date. If she moves out the day after but returns a day before the 3 months pass and cohabits past the 3-months cutoff date, it is taken to have been condoned.

I have no reason to argue with the situation that exists in Law - if it is bad enough to allow grounds for divorce, then that should be enough punishment ... considering that most people who adulterous are doing so just for their own enjoyment, and very few actually elevate their affair to a level where they would wish to have it jeopardise their marriage.

If adultery takes place - it should be up to the other spouse to either condone it, or to file for divorce on the grounds of adultery. If he/she chooses to condone it, then the other spouse should not be tryable in a Criminal Court - because how they deal with adultery in their marriage is their problem not one of the state.

Just imagine, too - if it was a statutory crime to be adulterous, people could not live in Open Marriages. Whilst I do not agree with the idea of an open marriage - it could be a good possibility in the case where one of the spouses is bisexual: That they can pursue their sexual drive at the permission of their spouse, whilst still having the opportunity to a family life in a heterosexual marriage, possibly inclusive of the upbringing of children (who should, though, ideally be left in the dark about the off-course homosexual encounters of their parent).

I feel that if I was married and had the wife cheat on me, that it should be up to me to decide what to do with the situation, rather than to have the state step in and lock her up. If it were a fine, i.e. not punishable with prison or death, then that would not be a good option for me either - as I would want the compensation for the damage to go to myself as the wronged party, and not to the state.

Also, remember that if adultery was to be a capital crime, or a crime worthy of a prison term - any children that exist from the marriage will hardly see much child support being offered to their mother/father for their upbringing, and will additionally not only have to live with the stigma of coming from a broken family, but to come from a background where one of their parents did time.

As to making it a crime to scare people away from doing adultery - I disbelieve that Law should exist to make people afraid of leading any type of conduct: Instead, one should apply to people's common sense as to what is considered honorable - and only introduce criminal laws where the introduction of such is to protect parties from injury. Law by coercion is an idea I consider too Positivist, too reminiscent of John Austrin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Austin_(legal_philosophy))'s legal philosophy.

Resurgam
Friday, November 7th, 2008, 12:45 AM
At the very least there has to be some civil penalties for adultery. A person who has committed adultery should not be allowed to hold any public office, for example. Though we have officials who have claimed that adultery is a private matter, a marriage is an oath-bound civil contract conducted publicly with the same weight under the law as an oath of office.

Sigurd
Friday, November 7th, 2008, 01:17 AM
A person who has committed adultery should not be allowed to hold any public office, for example.

By that count, Joseph Goebbels, who was - irrespective of the merits or legacy of his ideology or personal involvement in it - one of the most skilled statesmen that any Germanic country has ever had, would have had to step down due to his adulterous affair with a Czech model back in 1938. ;)


Though we have officials who have claimed that adultery is a private matter, a marriage is an oath-bound civil contract conducted publicly with the same weight under the law as an oath of office.In general, I can see where you are coming from. Maybe any such civil penalty for adultery could, or should be conditional: Maybe it could ban an adulterer from holding an office for the 5 years after the surfacing of his adultery on the basis of serving as a bad example?

Overall, however, I doubt this is the way forward - for this is what we have in today's politics: Secretaries of state can make a total mess of their ministerial duties and are fine, but if they have an affair with their secretary, then they are expected to step down. A bit of a paradox, really.

A more effective way to deal with this, would be to change public opinion to the extent that they see an adulterer much in the same light that they would see a murderer - then they would be less likely to vote for him in the first place, should he/she stand for office. That way, he would have to redeem himself beyond reasonable doubt in the eyes of the public before he would realistically have any chance for an office of state.

But to ban them from office for life on the basis of having been unexemplary in their own four walls is something a little to Puritan for my tastes. As long as they make an obvious effort to redeem themselves for their dishonorable actions in marriage, then they should not be barred from holding an office.

I do not find adultery commendable, but I prefer to view them as bad examples rather than to elevate their crime to a level equal with those crimes I consider capital crimes - murder, rape and paedophila - by putting them down in an "Adulterer's Register" and barring them from holding any official office for life.

Thrymheim
Friday, November 7th, 2008, 09:33 AM
marrige and adultery are private matters and should stay that way, there should be no laws for or against either. Apart from being practicaly unenforcable, one would assume that the loss of your partner through your own stupidity should be punishment enough.

Maelstrom
Friday, November 7th, 2008, 11:25 AM
marrige and adultery are private matters and should stay that way, there should be no laws for or against either. Apart from being practicaly unenforcable, one would assume that the loss of your partner through your own stupidity should be punishment enough.

I can see your point there.

Especially in small communities the individual(s) that has committed the act of adultery would be shunned by his/her community. Private matters don't often remain private for long.

Laws on adultery don't need to exist but adultery should be taken into account during any divorce settlement. As far as the emotional 'price' goes I think it's more important that anti-adulterous social stigmas stay in place so the committer of the act is ridiculed by the community :rockhurl

Resurgam
Friday, November 7th, 2008, 03:18 PM
My friend and landlord's occupation is a turn-around consultant. When a business is distressed, they are sent in to take a look at management with a fresh set of eyes. The bank essentially placed him in charge of this glass company since the company couldn't pay their creditor. It was the last lead crystal company in the United States and he had to start liquidation. The last three companies he encountered had their problems start with some type of marital infidelity. With the last one, the president of the company was married to the owner's daughter but decided to have an affair with a secretary. In the assignment before that, similar type of stuff but their was a pregnancy also involved.

Pino
Friday, November 7th, 2008, 03:46 PM
People yet again thinking within the prison of Roman Law again, why does a morality issue require a law?

If people commit adultury they should not be regarded as criminals and face criminal punishments but the community should socially exclude them, the community will not give such people a say or power in the community and whenever sombody mentions there name everybody will think "of the one who commited adultury". In this way I think you create a situation where people will not want to commit adultury more so than if you was to criminalize it, this is why adultury in modern times is so wide spread because it is socially accepted in our commnuties, if it wasn't accepted people would not do it for the sake of putting there own name in vein. A bit similar to how Women used to hang onto there virginity for as long as possible or atleast not sleep around, not because it was a criminal offence but because it was not socially acceptable however this seems to have changed as well.

Maybe if adultury was considerd un-acceptable people would be alot more picky about who they marry and would create a healthy competitive situation where only the best marry the best therefore the best breed with the best.

I think Polygammy should be allowed for the best Males with a few of the best Females as there genes must be passed on in abundance.

Siebenbürgerin
Saturday, November 8th, 2008, 11:29 AM
In my view, adultery shouldn't be a crime. It's low behaviour, but locking away a father because he cheated on the mother is more harmful to the family than living with it. The members of a family should be able to resolve the matters between them, privately.

By the way if you want to discuss polygamy, please do it in this thread:
http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=92342

In this thread you must discuss adultery, being unfaithful to the souse. Adultery exists in polygamies too, if the husband cheats with someone other than his plural wives. ;)

Ęmeric
Saturday, November 8th, 2008, 02:23 PM
In this thread you must discuss adultery, being unfaithful to the souse. Adultery exists in polygamies too, if the husband cheats with someone other than his plural wives. ;)I'm not certain of that. In some societies, adultery was when a married woman had sexual relations with someone other then her husband. Before the 19th century, was any woman granted a divorce because of her husband's infidelity?

SwordOfTheVistula
Wednesday, November 12th, 2008, 08:17 AM
Adultery is still a crime in certain jurisdictions (New York state for instance).


Adultery currently is a reason for divorce in Scotland, and if it is proven that adultery existed, the marriage can be dissolved, and evidently the adulterer/adulteress will come out much worse out of the divorce settlement, as they are taken to have caused it. That should be enough punishment per se.

That's the main difference in New York vs other states, in New York adultery is taken into account as a reason for divorce proceedings, in other states it is 'no fault divorce' meaning that nothing is taken into account regarding the reasons for divorce.


It is a crime that deserves capital punishment.

I think it should be left up to an individual basis rather than a state action, there should not be legal repercussions to someone who kills or otherwise punishes a spouse due to adultery.

Alice
Wednesday, November 12th, 2008, 02:10 PM
Should adultery be treated as a crime?
Would be it be possible to legally accuse persons of adultery?
If adultery should be a crime, what should be the punishment and who should be found guilty?
Would making adultery a crime further destroy families and society or help to save them?

No, as others have already said, it's certainly not a nice thing, but criminalising it smacks of Calvin's Geneva (where some adulterers were put to death), Saudi Arabia and some ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities today. Not something to emulate, I think.

Hrodnand
Wednesday, November 12th, 2008, 02:38 PM
No, it shouldn't be considered as crime, but a stronger cultural intolerance should be showed towards it, especially among us, germanics.
Adultery is not a germanic trait, nor should it be tolerated as it is nowadays. :thumbdown
We easily find ourselves in a society where adultery has almost become a fashion.

Anfang
Wednesday, November 12th, 2008, 03:02 PM
I am a monogamist, but there should be no rules and not even value judgements. Where there are these values there is also a duble standard, and women get the short end of the stick.

We cannot rule out polygamy also, both ways. Our germanic ancestors could end their marriage once a year, that we know for certain. Wether they did it often was up to the individual people. repeat, this is against my personal way but we should never twist the truth to fit our norms of today!

Ulf
Wednesday, November 12th, 2008, 03:29 PM
If I ever committed adultery I'd leave it up to my wife to choose my punishment.

SwordOfTheVistula
Thursday, November 13th, 2008, 06:32 AM
I am a monogamist, but there should be no rules and not even value judgements.

If you don't even have value judgements, people will just do whatever feels good, total chaos.

Rhydderch
Thursday, November 13th, 2008, 08:06 AM
but criminalising it smacks of Calvin's Geneva (where some adulterers were put to death)Calvin's Geneva? Are you saying Calvin introduced execution for adultery in contrast to previous Roman Catholic custom?

Anfang
Thursday, November 13th, 2008, 08:25 AM
If you don't even have value judgements, people will just do whatever feels good, total chaos.

It was obvious that I was writing about value judgements on "adultery".

If , as was the case at the end of WWII, many young men are dead
and there is for example ,a 2 to 1 ratio of females to males, 'adultery' becomes a duty in racial terms. Here is another example of jewish- spawned non germanic thinking infesting the minds of "The West".
especially the Americans who have never lost millions of men in a war.

SwordOfTheVistula
Friday, November 14th, 2008, 07:35 AM
It was obvious that I was writing about value judgements on "adultery".

If , as was the case at the end of WWII, many young men are dead
and there is for example ,a 2 to 1 ratio of females to males, 'adultery' becomes a duty in racial terms. Here is another example of jewish- spawned non germanic thinking infesting the minds of "The West".
especially the Americans who have never lost millions of men in a war.

What does that have to do with adultery? Adultery is a married person having sexual relations with a person other than their spouse. Adultery would just produce a bunch of single mothers, which would have been decidedly bad for society. If anything, allow polygamy, which would fix the problem while not having any extramarital relations.

Jäger
Friday, November 14th, 2008, 12:56 PM
If , as was the case at the end of WWII, many young men are dead and there is for example ,a 2 to 1 ratio of females to males, 'adultery' becomes a duty in racial terms.
Polygamy is the answer, not adultury, polygamy underlines the responsibility of the man, not the irresponsibility like adultury.

Adultury should be punished according to contract law, if you vow to have no others besides your partner and you betray that vow, you are a traitor.
Loyalty and honor are the fundamentals of every high culture, in all aspects of life.

Bridie
Friday, November 14th, 2008, 03:10 PM
I think it is a matter for family and church.

Sigurd
Monday, November 17th, 2008, 01:46 PM
The posts discussing polygamy have been split off and merged into the Monogamy and Human Nature (http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=86692) thread. There were several threads on different aspects of polygamy, but by the content of the posts, this one seemed most related to the issues upon which the posts were built.

The question of the nature, causes, historicality, morality, and naturality (or lack of any of the aforementioned) is one that merits some attention, which is why the choice was to split the posts into another thread rather than to preclude discussion altogether. :)

Halfr
Sunday, March 22nd, 2009, 11:24 PM
A crime? Only if we are talking about abusing somebody's trust, then I would consider it a personal crime against that certain someone.

Ragnar Lodbrok
Monday, March 23rd, 2009, 01:43 AM
A crime? Only if we are talking about abusing somebody's trust, then I would consider it a personal crime against that certain someone.

I actually wouldn't say that it's a personal crime against a certain someone. Abusing somebody's trust is what I would call a personal impolite and stupid act against someone. Adultery and the act of violating ones marriage vows was for good reason, considered a crime against natural law and the folk along with ergei. In many very ancient Germanic villages these sexually promiscuous and defective people were drowned in swamps so as to keep the future folk generations emotionally and mentally healthy.

Blood_Axis
Monday, March 23rd, 2009, 11:04 AM
I don't think it should be a crime.

In fact it's totally up to each couple to weigh the specifics of each situation and deal with it the appropriate way.

I know of women, e.g., that are willing to forgive their husband's infidelities, because they want to keep their family together. Others will not tolerate it at all. Others consider whether it was a one time thing and/or whether it was somehow "justified"...e.g. if one partner has been neglecting the other, and so on, and so forth.

Each situation is different and different people also deal with it in different ways.

Nachtengel
Sunday, June 14th, 2009, 07:26 PM
Yes, with some exceptions which should not be considered as adultery:
-the (wo)man has sexual relations with his second, third, etc. husband/wife (in polygamy)
-it is done with consent (open relationships/marriages)

How forgiving the partner is, is another story. If s/he decides not to accuse the other of adultery, it's up to them. The adulterer should be able to be sued for money or other reparations towards his family, especially if there are children involved.

Poupoune
Friday, July 24th, 2009, 02:48 PM
In France, you cannot be liable in criminal law for being unfaithful, adultery is first treachery towards to oneself. Inconstancy is already a punishment, and logically would be punish by the abolition of the right to vote!

Bärin
Friday, July 24th, 2009, 02:52 PM
It should be a crime and judged as treason. The family is a smaller unit of the nation. Betraying it is like betraying your nation.

thoughtcrime
Friday, July 24th, 2009, 03:22 PM
It's not a crime. Weakness of character can't be considered a crime, that'd be like punishing someone for being physically or intellectually weak and thus unable to protect and aid his family (because he can't get a job to buy what his family needs or fend off a threat).

When starting a relationship, both partners silently agree to take the risk of getting (mentally) hurt by the other (otherwise it wouldn't be possible to get so near). I also wouldn't give all the fault for the splitting to the cheating side. There are often "good" (if one can call it that way) reasons why they cheated, for example emotional coldness or ignorance by the partner. Things and people change, faster than most would think. Often, the "victim" bears as much of the fault as the "delinquent".

Still, I agree that children in the relationship give the whole thing another dimension. Still, it's a thing only controllable through ethics or, even better, reason, not through laws. It'd be impossible for a court to tell which "fault" it was the relationship crashed. I'd say in most of the cases it's both of them.

Sigurd
Wednesday, August 12th, 2009, 06:29 PM
Adultury should be punished according to contract law, if you vow to have no others besides your partner and you betray that vow, you are a traitor.

Why according to Contract Law and not according to Delict Law? Is it not more sensible to consider adultery as an injury? What are you going to do in cases where the court would decide rather than to count it as a breach of contract, due to its "mild" nature (for example, kissing a person not your spouse) and instead order the person to enforce a contract of fidelity? Sounds rather abstract to me. ;)

Besides that, the social stigma connected with being part of a civil Delict action is perhaps greater than that of being part of a civil Contract action. Being considered a menace to society is to many certainly more of a social stigma than being known not to be able to keep one's signed word. :shrug

Blod og Jord
Wednesday, April 7th, 2010, 04:10 PM
No, it shouldn't be a crime.
First of all, some people prefer to forgive or even allow adultery. It's their choice and their business.
Second of all, people make mistakes. Nobody's perfect. If someone cheats on their partner, it's better solved between them than the law coming and punishing the adulterer. When it's made a public game, it has worse consequences for the family than if they deal with it their own way.
If someone doesn't want to forgive the adulterer there are many ways of punishment.

Neophyte
Wednesday, April 7th, 2010, 06:06 PM
Should adultery be treated as a crime?
Would be it be possible to legally accuse persons of adultery?
If adultery should be a crime, what should be the punishment and who should be found guilty?
Would making adultery a crime further destroy families and society or help to save them?

It should, at a minimum, be treated as a breach of contract. If you promise fidelity and then go off and, well... Then you have violated the terms of the deal. Period.

Mouse Shadow
Thursday, April 8th, 2010, 04:47 AM
If you considered from a females perspective, emotional bonds, sexual bonds, thoughts of family and 'virtuous' behaviour are what we would endeavour to uphold with a partner. It's the clause of forever after, and having the relationship which supports both our concept of mutual 'togetherness' and sensibility for the community and taking care of one another when you are sick. If some guy wants to go and poke around a whole bunch of other females, it's always the girl who cops it short. Not only are the sexual bonds broken, the emotional trust, the aspect of virtue too. AND, by screwing other perhaps less careful females, the disrespected girl could further end up with all sorts of STD's.

If she was trying to do the best she could, her heart is ripped out by such behaviour. If kids were involved then they are detrimentally affected. Take El-Supremo-F*ck-Wit-Tiger-Woods.

I think it'd be great to forcibly tattoo the adulterers with big text across them so as if one 'new' girl went to have sex with them, she'd understand that this person is a cad and probably loaded with disease.

Thus, girls could understand the dangers and for the men, the persistent risk of humiliation and a lack of gaining new sexual partners may end up making men 'behave' for their girl. Take more time adjusting to her needs and becoming closer because of it. (Also gender vice-versa too). The jewish television 'screw tube' is damaging the very fabric of 'couple togetherness' and ‘partner respect’. Monkey see, monkey do.

The jewish owned 'screw-tube' should go on trial for crimes against humanity! They need to get that broken filth out of our culture!!!!

I just get the feeling, when someone cheats, they either never establish the coupling-bond, or lie about it. And those who are coupling-oriented will inevitably stay together and not stray (so long as they aren’t affected by the tv!). Those who don't exhibit such a nature and are destined to cheat. They should not be with a girl (or boy) who likes to be 'joined together in love'. To violate or cheat such an intimate bond with someone predisposed to coupling is an ultimate disgrace.

Those who 'fake' love need to be neutered. Like sociopaths, multiple cheaters and Tiger-Wankin-Woods. It'd probably do the world a lot of good if the cheaters would go off and screw themselves stupid without having kids. And the rest of us could go back to doing what we care about, loving and progressing our babies and societies.

For me, I'll make sure the adulterers get the best fag-adulterer-tattoo ever! I’d push the needle right into their bones!

Herr Rentz
Tuesday, August 21st, 2018, 05:51 PM
[Staff note: discussion has been split from this thread (https://forums.skadi.net/threads/173765-quot-Once-a-Cheater-Always-a-Cheater-quot?p=1238677#post1238677).]


Cheating is repugnant. It breaks a heart, it ends blind trust, it puts into question all the former loyalty you felt towards your partner. We all have our flaws, but there's one sin that can never be forgiven. It's called "betrayal". If it happens within a marriage I would try to pick up the pieces and try to reconcile, outside of it: never. However, I would make my wife sweat - and she must be willing to make amends and show genuine remorse. She's gonna have to make up by jumping through loopholes to regain some of my trust. If she can't she's gonna have to find a different home to live in. I wouldn't divorce her nor remarry because a Catholic can't do that, but practically we would be divorced.

The thing about cheating is: lately, women's magazines have popularized and normalized cheating. "Everyone is cheating, why aren't you doing it?" Like it's cool, trendy and hip and the thing to do if you want to be part of the cool kids. Making cheaters fashionable can only have a negative effect.

Would it be so bad if we made adultery illegal again?

It is still illegal in the Military, but seldom ever prosecuted.

Žoreišar
Wednesday, August 22nd, 2018, 12:45 PM
Would it be so bad if we made adultery illegal again?There's not many acts that I consider more despicable than adultery, but I do find hard to consider marriage (or any other human relationship) a matter that the State should have any jurisdiction over.

In a historical context, it seems adultery was punished quite severely in most parts of Europe from the Middle Ages up until the first half of the 20th century, not seldom leading to capital punishment. The reasoning behind such severe punishments seems to have been centered around the uncertainty of paternity, seeing as an adulterous women could not prove which man was the true father of her children. Nowadays, that uncertainty is not much of an issue, even though the feelings of aversion might be just as strongly ingrained in us. A woman committing adultery today does not cause the same damage as a woman committing it 500 years ago, or even just 70 years ago.

In any case, what should be the proposed punishment for adultery as mandated by the State?

Gareth Lee Hunter
Wednesday, August 22nd, 2018, 01:32 PM
There's not many acts that I consider more despicable than adultery, but I do find hard to consider marriage (or any other human relationship) a matter that the State should have any jurisdiction over.

In a historical context, it seems adultery was punished quite severely in most parts of Europe from the Middle Ages up until the first half of the 20th century, not seldom leading to capital punishment. The reasoning behind such severe punishments seems to have been centered around the uncertainty of paternity, seeing as an adulterous women could not prove which man was the true father of her children. Nowadays, that uncertainty is not much of an issue, even though the feelings of aversion might be just as strongly ingrained in us. A woman committing adultery today does not cause the same damage as a woman committing it 500 years ago, or even just 70 years ago.

In any case, what should be the proposed punishment for adultery as mandated by the State?

Penalizing such acts of moral turpitude will inevitably lead to a slippery slope involving witch hunts.

How would a court handle such cases unless reliable, unbiased witnesses, combined with photos depicting the adulterous affair in flagrante delicto are provided in court. Without such evidence, it is just too easy for a disgruntled spouse to accuse their SO of adultery in an unethical effort to garner sympathy in divorce court.

Plus, if dependent progeny are involved, incarcerating the guilty parent will only cause them to suffer even more psychological damage than is caused by a divorce.

Also, how is the imprisoned parent supposed to provide necessary support payments?

Žoreišar
Wednesday, August 22nd, 2018, 10:55 PM
How would a court handle such cases unless reliable, unbiased witnesses, combined with photos depicting the adulterous affair in flagrante delicto are provided in court. Without such evidence, it is just too easy for a disgruntled spouse to accuse their SO of adultery in an unethical effort to garner sympathy in divorce court.Well, you actually do have private detectives who specialize on spying and collecting material on suspected adulterers/cheaters on assignment from a suspicious SO. Sure, you would hardly get a hold of cold, hard proof of the juicy bits, but that isn't even a requirement to sentence people for murder. All you need is proof beyond a reasonable doubt of innocence.


Also, how is the imprisoned parent supposed to provide necessary support payments?That is what prison jobs are for. ;)

J.Yaxley
Wednesday, August 22nd, 2018, 11:43 PM
I think that eliminating the toxic media message that 'cheating is fine' would be more than enough. Societies naturally tend to reach a healthy equilibrium when they aren't being poisoned by outside influences, if you catch my drift.

SaxonPagan
Wednesday, August 22nd, 2018, 11:52 PM
I agree. It would be ridiculous to make adultery a crime at a time when it's being pushed so hard in the (((media))) and this would put the State out of sync with its own agenda so it's not going to happen :nope

My missus spends about an hour watching all those tacky soap operas every evening and just about everyone has a relationship problem of some kind, with adultery being rife.

Gareth Lee Hunter
Thursday, August 23rd, 2018, 01:35 AM
I agree. It would be ridiculous to make adultery a crime at a time when it's being pushed so hard in the (((media))) and this would put the State out of sync with its own agenda so it's not going to happen :nope

My missus spends about an hour watching all those tacky soap operas every evening and just about everyone has a relationship problem of some kind, with adultery being rife.

You're right, of course. I fear penalizing adultery would do more harm than good.

My little lady is a singer, among other interesting things. She worked the club circuit, cut a demo, and is currently following an increasingly popular group who is interested in making her their lead female vocalist.

Lilly likes to sing cheating songs, which are indeed quite popular in certain circles. She posted some of this genre here, and one jerk, who was eventually banned, accused her of being an adulteress, among other horrible things. I'm surprised she even agreed to post here again.

SaxonPagan
Thursday, August 23rd, 2018, 02:46 AM
Lilly likes to sing cheating songs, which are indeed quite popular in certain circles. She posted some of this genre here, and one jerk, who was eventually banned, accused her of being an adulteress

:doh

Some folks take things far too seriously :blueroll:

I mean, look at the case of Tammy Wynette whose most famous song was "Stand By Your Man" but she ended up having 5 husbands & 4 divorces!!! :lol

LillyCaterina
Sunday, August 26th, 2018, 02:02 AM
Before we met, Gareth and I had relationships with married people.

I was all messed-up due to losing my abusive first husband to divorce when I got involved with a married man while singing at a local cocktail lounge. And Gareth got involved with a woman at a local club who never told him she was married until after he fell in love with her. He nearly killed himself after she told him this because his papa warned him not to mess with married women.

I'm not trying to seek absolution here. Adultery can never be justified. But it happens. :(

Gareth and I are both very sorry it happened. And we both know we will answer for it.

Sól
Monday, August 27th, 2018, 09:46 AM
No, absolutely not. Adultery is a private matter, how it's dealt with depends on the people involved. No reason for the state/government to get involved in their business. Besides, it could be easily faked or set up. If eyewitnesses would be enough, it would be heavily abused. What's with this obsession with poking your noses in other people's relationships?