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ladybright
Tuesday, November 27th, 2007, 03:52 AM
Does anyone have suggestions for easy coloring pages or simple crafts for my daughter's preschool? They are doing little crafts/activites for Haunukkah, Los Posasadas, Kwanza, St Nicholas Day(Sinterklass) and American Christmas. We were invited in a letter to share special holiday traditions.:D I was thinking about rice porriage on christmas morning as a kid. Most of what my daughter is involved with is decorating and thanking nature.

I was thinking a coloring page with a St Lucia and some kind of paper cut outs for them to put together. Mistiletoe or yule goats maybe. Our area is HEAVILY christian and I do not want to be too alienate the other parents. We are private about religion generally so this would be the first I have brought up anyting like this.

freyjaschild
Sunday, December 2nd, 2007, 09:31 AM
I have an idea you might want to check out, if you haven't aleady. There is a Yahoo! group called Asatru Crafts for Kids. Actually, there were so many people signed up, and there are so many files of crafts and activities that three more sister groups had to be opened, just to have space for everything. The links are below, in case you'd like to request membership. I am SURE you will find something great there.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Asatru_Crafts_For_Kids/
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Asatru_Crafts_For_Kids_2/
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Asatru_Crafts_For_Kids_3/
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Asatru_Crafts_For_Kids_4/

I know Asatru Crafts for Kids 4 has Winter Solstice, Winter, and Yule activities, but Asatru Crafts for Kids 3 has some Yule crafts too. I would just surf through all of them to make sure. Just check under the "Files" section.

I hope this helps!

Gorm the Old
Sunday, December 2nd, 2007, 06:32 PM
The real joker in this deck of solstice celebrations is Kwanza. It was invented by a black American anthropologist. It's not a real African holiday at all.

A friend of mine who was teaching music in the public schools a few years ago was ordered by the powers that be to multiculturalize the holiday song program by teaching the students Hanukkah songs and Kwanza songs as well.

She asked her black students "How do you celebrate Kwanza in your homes ?"
All of them answered "We don't." :O

ladybright
Friday, December 7th, 2007, 12:51 AM
Here is what I am sending in with her tommorrow. I will let you know how it is recieved. :fviking


Julbock, the Yule Goat
The Yule Goat is a typical Scandinavian Christmas ornament made of straw which is used as decoration throughout the home

Norse Mythology and the origins of the Yule Goat

Before Christianity arrived in Scandinavia, the ancient Scandinavians used to celebrate the winter solstice around the same time that we celebrate Christmas today. The winter solstice is the longest night and shortest day of the year, and from here the days gradually increase in length and bring us spring and summer. For the ancient Scandinavians, the beginning of the end of winter was a very important reason for celebration.

One of those traditional winter solstice celebrations was the Yule Goat. The Yule Goat was a person disguised as a goat who went from house to house entertaining families with songs and dances, and receiving drink and food in exchange for the entertainment.

Why would a goat be going from house to house to entertain people? In Norse mythology, the good-natured, protective god Thor traveled around in a charriot that was drew by two magical goats. It is believed that the ancient tradition of the Yule Goat represented the magical goats who came with Thor as he visited the Scandinavian homes bringing happiness and protection at this very special time of the year.


The Yule Goat, a typical Scandinavian Christmas symbol

During the 19th century the tradition of the Yule Goat started to be displaced by our modern Santa Claus, who also visits every home and brings happiness to all the family. In Scandinavia the goat disguise was substituted by the jolly man in red, yet the Yule Goat was never forgotten.

People started making goats with straw and used them to decorate the house during Christmas time, as a reminder of the old days when the Yule Goat visited their homes and brought entertainment and happiness. This tradition remains particularly strong in Sweden and Finland, where straw goats are used as a decorative item practically everywhere: Christmas trees, dinnertables, gardens...


Gävlebocken, the biggest Yule Goat in the world

In Sweden, the Yule Goat tradition is so strong that you may even find large-scale straw goats displayed in public squares. The most famous of all them is the world-famous Gävlebocken, a giant straw goat which is built annually in the town of Gävle, about 180 km north of Stockholm.

The Gävlebocken was born in 1966 after a local citizen thought about displaying a giant-scale Yule Goat in the town centre. The town put hands to work and they succeeded a 13-metres-tall and 7-metres-long straw goat. Since then, the Gävlebocken has been built every year starting on the first day of Advent, which marks the beginning of the Christmas celebrations in Scandinavia.

The Gävlebocken is today a world-famous typical Swedish icon. In 1994 the giant goat accompanied the Swedish National Hockey Team to the World Championships which were held in Italy, and in 1993 the Gävlebocken got into the Guinness Book of Records as the tallest straw goat ever build (14.9 metres-high).
Source (http://www.scandinavica.com/culture/tradition/yulegoat.htm)

Swedish Lucia Tradition

The Swedish Lucia celebration is an annual festival of medieval origin, observed on the 13th of December. On this day, the darkness is brightened by Saint Lucia, a creature of goodness and light who opens the door to the Christmas season.

Named after a Sicilian saint, the Swedish Lucia does not have much in common with her namesake. She is celebrated in a variety of ways, but the most common is the Lucia procession consisting of a group of young girls and boys singing traditional Lucia songs.

On her head, the girl or woman playing the part of Lucia wears a wreath of lingonberry sprigs with holders for real candles (battery-powered ones are sometimes a safer option) to give the effect of a halo. She also has a white, full-length gown with a red ribbon around her waist. Her female attendants (tärnor) wear similar gowns and the "star boys" (stjärngossar) wear white pointed hats decorated with stars. Lucia processions are held in various places, ranging from kindergartens and schools to churches and the Swedish Parliament.

Lucia can be perceived as a symbol of the good forces in life and a symbol of light in the dark winter. She usually appears early in the morning, bringing coffee and saffron-flavored buns (lussekatter) traditionally eaten around Christmas time in Sweden.

New Yorkers can catch Lucia in all her splendor at Ulrika's on East 60th Street on December 11-14, 2004.

Source: www.sweden.sesource (http://www.swedenabroad.com/Page____29811.aspx)
Also a page (http://www.serve.com/shea/germusa/lucylied.htm) with the song in English translation.

http://www.salemlutheranchurch.com/YearlyEvents/images/Lucia_Transparent.gif

barry
Friday, December 7th, 2007, 05:16 PM
The real joker in this deck of solstice celebrations is Kwanza. It was invented by a black American anthropologist. It's not a real African holiday at all.

A friend of mine who was teaching music in the public schools a few years ago was ordered by the powers that be to multiculturalize the holiday song program by teaching the students Hanukkah songs and Kwanza songs as well.

She asked her black students "How do you celebrate Kwanza in your homes ?"
All of them answered "We don't." :O



Thats the funniest thing i,ve heard in along time.i wonder what father kwanza will bring me
for kwanzatide, maybe i should leave some kwanza pies for rudolf the red nosed wilderbeast.;)

ladybright
Friday, December 7th, 2007, 09:26 PM
The teacher is happy with what I brought in. I am going to make paper St. Lucia and starboy hats to take in and attempt a Julbok this weekend. The dried wheat I bought has been soaking for over 24 hours. Hopefully I can bend it without breaking it now. I will post a picture when I am done.

They are not going to do kwanzaa again unless there is a black kid 'child of a certain ethnicity' in class.(Can you tell that she is a young and enthusiastic teacher. Sporty, sweet, skinny and blond.) It was just too abstract for them. The holidays around the world is a bit much for the for year olds and well beyond the three year old class she has. My daughters response when I askerd her what she did that day was 'Green, red, black! Again!:D 'They had made placemats for that and glued pieces of green, red and black for Los Posasadas And coloed pictures of mexican kids. She made a popsicle stick star of david (and she is very pround of it) and handprint menorah. She could understand that people would be happy that they still have light aafter they ran out of oil. They colored cut out clogs for Sinterklass. (I was there early so I taped candy to each childs clog.)

My thoughts on the Kwanzaa is that it is the african american answer to eclectic wicca. Not my thing but better than rappers or gangland. I went to schools that has a high black minority and no ever mentioned doing Kwanzaa at home.:rolleyes: I knew wiccans but not heathens.

ladybright
Friday, December 7th, 2007, 10:25 PM
I had wondered why no one had anything to say about this project here when I realized that I had only posted about it on BuB. :shrug So here is what I posted.

Freyjaschild suggested the very nifty Asatru Crafts for Kids groups 1 (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Asatru_Crafts_For_Kids/), 2 (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Asatru_Crafts_For_Kids_2/), 3 (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Asatru_Crafts_For_Kids_3/) and 4 (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Asatru_Crafts_For_Kids_4/) on yahoo. You have to join the main group before joining the offshoots. Good stuff but more time intensive than will work for this preschool. (2 teachers to 19 four year olds.)

I have a daughter in preschool. They are doing little crafts/activities for Hanukkah, Los Posasadas, Kwanza, St Nicholas Day (Sinterklass) and American Christmas. We were invited in a letter to share special holiday traditions.

Our area is HEAVILY Christian and I do not want to be too alienate the other parents. We are private about religion generally so this would be the first I have brought up anything like this. Here is what I sent in today.


Julbock, the Yule Goat
The Yule Goat is a typical Scandinavian Christmas ornament made of straw which is used as decoration throughout the home

Norse Mythology and the origins of the Yule Goat

Before Christianity arrived in Scandinavia, the ancient Scandinavians used to celebrate the winter solstice around the same time that we celebrate Christmas today. The winter solstice is the longest night and shortest day of the year, and from here the days gradually increase in length and bring us spring and summer. For the ancient Scandinavians, the beginning of the end of winter was a very important reason for celebration.

One of those traditional winter solstice celebrations was the Yule Goat. The Yule Goat was a person disguised as a goat who went from house to house entertaining families with songs and dances, and receiving drink and food in exchange for the entertainment.

Why would a goat be going from house to house to entertain people? In Norse mythology, the good-natured, protective god Thor traveled around in a charriot that was drew by two magical goats. It is believed that the ancient tradition of the Yule Goat represented the magical goats who came with Thor as he visited the Scandinavian homes bringing happiness and protection at this very special time of the year.


The Yule Goat, a typical Scandinavian Christmas symbol

During the 19th century the tradition of the Yule Goat started to be displaced by our modern Santa Claus, who also visits every home and brings happiness to all the family. In Scandinavia the goat disguise was substituted by the jolly man in red, yet the Yule Goat was never forgotten.

People started making goats with straw and used them to decorate the house during Christmas time, as a reminder of the old days when the Yule Goat visited their homes and brought entertainment and happiness. This tradition remains particularly strong in Sweden and Finland, where straw goats are used as a decorative item practically everywhere: Christmas trees, dinnertables, gardens...


Gävlebocken, the biggest Yule Goat in the world

In Sweden, the Yule Goat tradition is so strong that you may even find large-scale straw goats displayed in public squares. The most famous of all them is the world-famous Gävlebocken, a giant straw goat which is built annually in the town of Gävle, about 180 km north of Stockholm.

The Gävlebocken was born in 1966 after a local citizen thought about displaying a giant-scale Yule Goat in the town centre. The town put hands to work and they succeeded a 13-metres-tall and 7-metres-long straw goat. Since then, the Gävlebocken has been built every year starting on the first day of Advent, which marks the beginning of the Christmas celebrations in Scandinavia.

The Gävlebocken is today a world-famous typical Swedish icon. In 1994 the giant goat accompanied the Swedish National Hockey Team to the World Championships which were held in Italy, and in 1993 the Gävlebocken got into the Guinness Book of Records as the tallest straw goat ever build (14.9 metres-high).Source (http://www.scandinavica.com/culture/tradition/yulegoat.htm)


Swedish Lucia Tradition

The Swedish Lucia celebration is an annual festival of medieval origin, observed on the 13th of December. On this day, the darkness is brightened by Saint Lucia, a creature of goodness and light who opens the door to the Christmas season.

Named after a Sicilian saint, the Swedish Lucia does not have much in common with her namesake. She is celebrated in a variety of ways, but the most common is the Lucia procession consisting of a group of young girls and boys singing traditional Lucia songs.

On her head, the girl or woman playing the part of Lucia wears a wreath of lingonberry sprigs with holders for real candles (battery-powered ones are sometimes a safer option) to give the effect of a halo. She also has a white, full-length gown with a red ribbon around her waist. Her female attendants (tärnor) wear similar gowns and the "star boys" (stjärngossar) wear white pointed hats decorated with stars. Lucia processions are held in various places, ranging from kindergartens and schools to churches and the Swedish Parliament.

Lucia can be perceived as a symbol of the good forces in life and a symbol of light in the dark winter. She usually appears early in the morning, bringing coffee and saffron-flavored buns (lussekatter) traditionally eaten around Christmas time in Sweden.

New Yorkers can catch Lucia in all her splendor at Ulrika's on East 60th Street on December 11-14, 2004.
Source (http://www.swedenabroad.com/Page____29811.aspx)
I also printed out this page (http://www.serve.com/shea/germusa/lucylied.htm) with the english translation.

The teacher is happy with what I brought in. I am going to make paper St. Lucia and starboy hats to take in and attempt a Julbok this weekend. The dried wheat I bought has been soaking for over 24 hours. Hopefully I can bend it without breaking it now. I will post a picture when I am done.

They are not going to do Kwanzaa again unless there is a black kid 'child of a certain ethnicity' in class.(Can you tell that she is a young and enthusiastic teacher. Sporty, sweet, skinny and blond.) It was just too abstract for them. The holidays around the world is a bit much for the for year olds and well beyond the three year old class she has. My daughters response when I asked her what she did that day was 'Green, red, black! Again! 'They had made placemats for that and glued pieces of green, red and black for Los Posasadas And colored pictures of Mexican kids. She made a popsicle stick star of David (and she is very proud of it) and handprint menorah. She could understand that people would be happy that they still have light after they ran out of oil. They colored cut out clogs for Sinterklass. (I was there early so I taped candy to each child’s clog.)

My thoughts on the Kwanzaa are that it is the african american answer to eclectic wicca. Not my thing but better than rappers or gangland. I went to schools that have a high black minority and no ever mentioned doing Kwanzaa at home. I knew wiccans but not heathens.

ladybright
Monday, December 10th, 2007, 12:58 PM
Here is my long faced goat:suspect , starboy hat and St Lucia crown. They are going into class today.

ladybright
Monday, December 10th, 2007, 12:59 PM
Here are our long headed goat(get a hold of him with your calipers, eh ;)), St Lucia crown and starboy hat.