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Ulf
Wednesday, May 9th, 2007, 10:42 PM
I'm not paranoid, just prepared. :D


When the next world-crushing disaster strikes tsunami, quake, dirty bomb, whatever one thing is certain: You're on your own. As hurricanes Katrina and Rita showed, help may not arrive for 72 hours. Don't fret. Wired has your back with these shopping lists for your DIY emergency kit. Because when everything goes to hell, you'll want gear that gives you an evolutionary advantage over your less-prepared neighbors. Clip and save; lock and load.

The House Kit

Store all this gear in a sealed plastic trash can or containers. It won't cost as much as you think: You probably own most of this stuff already.

A. First aid You could buy the $25 kit from Red Cross. Or you could build your own: bandages, alcohol, cotton balls, antidiarrheals, anti-inflammatories like ibuprofen, and prescription meds.

B. Clothes A full change, including warm outer layers (wool or synthetic) and sturdy shoes, for each person under your roof.

C. Plastic sheeting Fiber-reinforced, laminated polyethylene film, 6 mm thick. You can buy 1,200 square feet of Dura Skrim DS2 for about $100. Or get a tarp for covering broken windows, roofs.

D. Zip ties Handy when you have to make splints, compression bandages, or tourniquets.

E. Water A gallon per person, per day. For a family of four, that's 12 gallons. If you have the space for that, great. If not, keep as much as you can manage. Have unscented bleach on hand, too 16 drops in a gallon and you've got potable H20. Tea bags make it taste OK.

F. Food Raid the pantry: dehydrated soups, canned tuna and veggies, nuts and candy. Peanut butter is high-calorie and has a long shelf life. You can also buy freeze-dried camping meals. (If you can afford it I would recommend honey and honeycombs, they'll never spoil and loaded w/ good sugars for energy -Einzel)

G. Flashlight We like the Inova X5 it's water-resistant, aircraft-grade anodized aluminum and uses LEDs. But a cheap drugstore version and some batteries will do just fine.

H. Protective wear Waterproof and cut-resistant Kevlar gloves and N95 face masks.

I. Tools A crowbar to pry debris that might stand between you and a loved one. An adjustable wrench. Screwdrivers. A staple gun. Rope.

J. Matches You're probably not a Boy Scout. Get the kind marked waterproof and windproof and store 'em in a ziplock bag. In another bag, hoard some dryer lint for kindling.

The Go Pack

Keep these items in a backpack that's readily accessible you know, in case you have to bail at a moment's notice. One bag per person.

K. Radio A cheap transistor set with batteries is fine. Or you could get something that'll pick up TV and NOAA bands and that has a hand crank, like the Eton Grundig FR300 it comes with a cell phone charging jack and built-in flashlight. If you want to splurge, see page 95.

L. Cash $500 in small bills. ATMs won't work when the power is out, and neither will credit card readers.

M. Documents A copy of your home insurance policy, plus contact numbers, medical insurance card, passport, driver's license, bank records, and photos of family members. (A local map and spare keys may come in handy, too.)

N. Mylar space blanket It's a super-compact means of both keeping warm and reflecting heatstroke-causing rays of sun.

O. Clothes Put spares in a waterproof bag. Remember a hat. Toss in a few basic toiletries, too, like a toothbrush and toilet paper.

P. Food Make room for sports nutrition or candy bars. Nuts and trail mix are good options, too. Include a bottle of water.

Q. Essential medicines Whatever you've been prescribed, plus sunblock and ibuprofen or acetaminophen.

R. Duct tape Well, duh.

S. Signal devices Roadside flares will do. Or you could get Greatland Laser's Rescue Laser Flare two AA batteries and you have 72 hours of 20-mile-visible brightness. Also try the Fox 40 whistle (115 dB!).

T. Multitool Whether you come down on the Swiss Army side or the Leatherman side of the greatest debate of our time, just have one with you. Make sure it has a can opener, a good knife blade, and both Phillips and flat-head screwdrivers.

Edenkoben
Wednesday, May 9th, 2007, 11:16 PM
Very fine list.

I would add that you should pre-plan a couple evacuation routes from your home to somewhere safer. And you should establish a meet-up area where all your family and folk should try to gather in case the Bad Thing happens while you are separated by work/school.

You might also want to consider some sort of defensive device, in case things got really hairy.

As for paranoia vs. preparedness: First, let 'em call ya paranoid now but they'll be the first to your door in a crisis. Second, wrapping foil on your head to keep out space demons is paranoid; watching one week of TV news, thinking about the things that really do happen to everyday people and seeing how very little the government or neighbors do for one another and you see that preparation is the only wise way.

Ulf
Thursday, May 10th, 2007, 12:58 AM
Very fine list.

I would add that you should pre-plan a couple evacuation routes from your home to somewhere safer. And you should establish a meet-up area where all your family and folk should try to gather in case the Bad Thing happens while you are separated by work/school.

You might also want to consider some sort of defensive device, in case things got really hairy.

As for paranoia vs. preparedness: First, let 'em call ya paranoid now but they'll be the first to your door in a crisis. Second, wrapping foil on your head to keep out space demons is paranoid; watching one week of TV news, thinking about the things that really do happen to everyday people and seeing how very little the government or neighbors do for one another and you see that preparation is the only wise way.


Good suggestions. A rifle or "powerful" handgun, preferably .357 mag or larger would be good in case small game or deer were around, also good for defense.

More "lists" I have bookmarked.

10 day survival pack for $25 (http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/yago104.html)

How to tie the 10 Most useful knots (http://www.motherearthnews.com/gallery.aspx?id=113446)

Outdoorsman
Thursday, May 10th, 2007, 01:01 AM
Found a list of lists on the 'net.

http://www.windsofchange.net/archives/005071.php

Ulf
Thursday, May 10th, 2007, 01:14 AM
Also consider there will be no power, so try making your own solar power generator for $300.

Source (http://www.rain.org/~philfear/how2solar.html)

armourdis
Friday, May 11th, 2007, 03:52 PM
Good advice! My one qualm is the $500 in cash suggestion... while I understand that ATMs don't function without power, I also think that if it has come to the point where you absolutely need to use such a WTSHTF bag/box, having cash is likely the least of your worries. I would consider packing in its place extra water purification and protection.

Up until this point I've only kept tools, flares, and an extra weapon in my vehicle. How many folks have such a bag/box in home and car? Has anyone ever had to use it?

-hadley

Ulf
Saturday, May 12th, 2007, 04:50 AM
I go camping a lot and have a pack with all my essential gear needed for camping. It's not an emergency kit, but it has everything I would need if I needed to disappear for a little while. :D

SmokyGod
Saturday, May 12th, 2007, 06:18 AM
ah, a SHTF situation, eh?

Its good to have food and water handy, i've got HDR's (Humanitarian Daily Rations, 2200 calories each), lots of water in old soda bottles, guns, ammo, a respectable amount of canned foods, and, most importantly, chickens! Chickens are a great (and low-maintenance) way to produce food. I've got crank powered radios, an old CB, a small solar panel with an AC/DC adaptor, several acres of arable land, a pond (fish tastes great!) forest (firewood is important for upstate NY winters!), a fairly good medical kit, several combat knives and multitools, tons of camouflage, milsurp backpacks, canteens, helmets, gear, etc, and a few vehicles to boot!

I would say, in a REAL emergency, gold or valuables would be far more viable than paper money. I suggest, in a long-term breakdown of society, that one grows tobacco, marijuana, opium, or runs a still to generate income.

SmokyGod
Saturday, May 12th, 2007, 06:26 AM
Good advice! My one qualm is the $500 in cash suggestion... while I understand that ATMs don't function without power, I also think that if it has come to the point where you absolutely need to use such a WTSHTF bag/box, having cash is likely the least of your worries. I would consider packing in its place extra water purification and protection.

Up until this point I've only kept tools, flares, and an extra weapon in my vehicle. How many folks have such a bag/box in home and car? Has anyone ever had to use it?

-hadley

I have what is called a "Bug-Out Bag" (BOB) in case i need to get out quick, it consists of South African web gear, which has two large pouches that rest on the butt, each large pouch has two smaller pouches on it, in one large pouch i have medical supplies, the other large pouch contains face paint, a field manual for my rifle, a collapsable 1-liter water bottle, water purification tablets, hooks and line for fishing, and a firestarting kit. The web gear also comes with a clip-on backpack, which i have loaded with a very tiny Coleman cook stove and propane/butane fuel pack as well as an MRE and some Powerbars. I can detach and throw away the backpack if necessary (its non-essential). On the belt i have a combat knife, binoculars, a compass, and a multitool, as well as a pouch with 50 rounds of ammo for my SKS. This is my emergency reserve ammunition, my combat ammo is in a ChiCom chest rig which holds 210 rounds on stripper clips. I can choose from several different kinds of camouflage depending on the weather/season, and i have a fairly sturdy pair of boots.

This, of course, is absolute last-ditch. I plan to "bug-in" if a SHTF scenario happens. Plenty of land to farm, fish, and hunt on. Plenty of guns to defend it with. ;)

SmokyGod
Saturday, May 12th, 2007, 06:29 AM
Good suggestions. A rifle or "powerful" handgun, preferably .357 mag or larger would be good in case small game or deer were around, also good for defense.

More "lists" I have bookmarked.

10 day survival pack for $25 (http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/yago104.html)

How to tie the 10 Most useful knots (http://www.motherearthnews.com/gallery.aspx?id=113446)

As far as guns go, i imagine Springfield's M6 Scout rifle would be the most versatile. It is a break-open .410 and .22LR over-under. As far as pistols go, a large caliber revolver would be best from a defense standpoint, really you can take anything (absolutely ANYTHING) with a .22 .410 combo, so the pistol would be for wild animal attacks or unfriendly visitors. Something in .45 Long Colt would be nice :D

Outdoorsman
Saturday, May 12th, 2007, 06:27 PM
Good advice! My one qualm is the $500 in cash suggestion... while I understand that ATMs don't function without power, I also think that if it has come to the point where you absolutely need to use such a WTSHTF bag/box, having cash is likely the least of your worries. I would consider packing in its place extra water purification and protection.

That's a good point, but you may still need that cash when things have not hit the fan. Parts of the Northeast of the United States had a power outage that lasted a while. Undoubtedly it knocked out ATMs. It didn't distabilize into a "hit the fan" situation, but having some cash on hand probably would have been helpful.

Personally, I would suggest keeping in cash one month's expenses. I know that can be a lot for people, but that could really cover the bills for a month.

Ulf
Sunday, May 13th, 2007, 09:05 AM
I don't know how much space you think $500 would take up, but it certainly wouldn't take up as much space as a bottle of water. People will still value money during a disaster.

I think the only gun I would take with me would be either a .22 rifle or handgun, just for the shear amount of ammo you can pack into such a small place. Large caliber ammo would take up too much space to be really useful over a long period of time. That is if you are mobile, otherwise, large caliber all the way.

SmokyGod
Monday, May 14th, 2007, 01:13 AM
I don't know how much space you think $500 would take up, but it certainly wouldn't take up as much space as a bottle of water. People will still value money during a disaster.

I think the only gun I would take with me would be either a .22 rifle or handgun, just for the shear amount of ammo you can pack into such a small place. Large caliber ammo would take up too much space to be really useful over a long period of time. That is if you are mobile, otherwise, large caliber all the way.

A .22 brick of 550 rounds from Federal costs $10 and is only a few inches x a few inches.

Henry's AR-7 Survival Rifle is on my shopping list, for sure!

Edenkoben
Thursday, May 17th, 2007, 05:11 PM
A .22 brick of 550 rounds from Federal costs $10 and is only a few inches x a few inches.

Henry's AR-7 Survival Rifle is on my shopping list, for sure!

I think all you nice country-folk (and I mean that) are forgetting that we city dwellers won't be doing as much hunting as defending, perhaps even escaping. We can't expect any help from police, but a rifle peeking out of our backpacks is damn sure going to attract unwarranted attention.

That's why I recommend that city dwellers keep farm-friendships intact, devise a couple back-roads-out-of-town escape plans (police will shut down major roads in order to keep control) and be prepared to deal with all the degenerates who think that you have the emblem ATM on your forehead, ripe for a 'withdrawal.'

Personally, expecting urban unrest and breakdown this summer, I've found a new place outside of the city; can't wait to hear coyote and see badgers soon.:)

Ulf
Thursday, May 17th, 2007, 07:00 PM
Well then forget the rifle and get a nice .22 handgun!

I would recommend knowing some trails to walk on foot if going by car is improbable. This of course depends on the size of the city and how near it's edges you are.

Yngve
Thursday, May 17th, 2007, 11:16 PM
In my old church they stressed preparedness. I used to think they were just being paranoid, but like I had a revelation.

I started watching zombie movies and about the end of the world and how everything gets eaten and how the last humans fight for survival. Then I got to thinking I would be screwed if a earthquake hit my town. I would die or go insane because of my lack of preparedness.

I realized this like 5 minutes ago. I didn't think being prepared had anything to do with me and it was just hyped up paranoia, but now I see the truth.

Once again thank you for showing me the truth and probably saving my life.

SmokyGod
Friday, May 18th, 2007, 01:11 AM
I think all you nice country-folk (and I mean that) are forgetting that we city dwellers won't be doing as much hunting as defending, perhaps even escaping. We can't expect any help from police, but a rifle peeking out of our backpacks is damn sure going to attract unwarranted attention.



Ah! therein lies the beauty of the AR-7! Perfectly compact!

http://www.henryrepeating.com/h002_survival.cfm

Not good to store your main defensive weapon dissassembled in your backpack, though, so i reccomend a good knife like the SOG Trident folder or a Ka-Bar or Pilot's Knife.

If worst comes to worst i reccommend buying a single-shot break-open .410 shotgun and sawing the barrel down to about 6 inches and chopping the stock down into a pistol grip to create a "boot gun" like bikers use. Good guns, but very short range. 000 Buck or #4 are my favorite .410 loads FYI.

Europa
Friday, May 18th, 2007, 12:54 PM
Great list. However it mentions canned food. You will cursing up a storm later though, if you find you didn't manage to remember a can opener slipped in next to that firearm. :D

ladybright
Friday, May 18th, 2007, 02:10 PM
Practical Europa:thumbsup. Army navy stores sell those tiny ones that you can attach to a keychain or whatever.

Food banks appreciate them as well because some homeless people cannot affoard to easily replace their if they break and the army ones almost never break.

Ulf
Friday, May 18th, 2007, 06:22 PM
BAH! Who needs a can opener when you have a 12 gauge?!:D

Edenkoben
Friday, May 18th, 2007, 08:29 PM
BAH! Who needs a can opener when you have a 12 gauge?!:D

Because picking pellets out of one's baked beans is a bit of a buzzkill;)

Providing, of course, you could find any of the beans after the smoke cleared.

Outdoorsman
Saturday, May 19th, 2007, 12:08 AM
Ah! therein lies the beauty of the AR-7! Perfectly compact! http://www.henryrepeating.com/h002_survival.cfm

Now that is cool. :D


If worst comes to worst i reccommend buying a single-shot break-open .410 shotgun and sawing the barrel down to about 6 inches and chopping the stock down into a pistol grip to create a "boot gun" like bikers use. Good guns, but very short range. 000 Buck or #4 are my favorite .410 loads FYI.

Quite illegal to saw long arms that short, but in a SHTF situation, that will be the least of law enforcement's concerns.

Ulf
Saturday, May 19th, 2007, 01:12 AM
Because picking pellets out of one's baked beans is a bit of a buzzkill;)

Providing, of course, you could find any of the beans after the smoke cleared.

Haha alright, who need a can opener when you should have a Ka-Bar? :D


Quite illegal to saw long arms that short, but in a SHTF situation, that will be the least of law enforcement's concerns.

I was thinking the same thing. Just saw it off as SHTF, not before, you don't need that sort of trouble! See: Ruby Ridge.

SmokyGod
Saturday, May 19th, 2007, 05:41 AM
oh yes, Ladybright just reminded me that i should have put a big disclaimer on that. Although when i said "if worst comes to worst" should be sufficient, but... Yes, it will land you jail time. If you are in a SHTF situation i would say jail is the least of your worries, hell, they give you 3 meals a day and shelter! It could be better than roughing it by yourself!

The tiny can opener Ladybright is referring to is called a P-38, and i have a couple of them. Go to the next military show and ask them for P-38 can openers, they have a million uses and cost about 50 cents a pop.

I would shy away from actually carrying canned foods. Stockpile them, but take jerky or powerbars with you on short trips, MRE's or HDR's (Humanitarian Daily Rations, the same size as an MRE but with a whole day's worth of calories) for longer trips. The big sacks of rice and beans are a must, canned vegetables, canned fruit, Spam, anything with a decent shelf life. Diversify, therin lies the key to good health. Long-lasting multivitamins are a good idea, too.

For those of you who are city dwellers i suggest getting a cheap break-open airgun and a few thousand hunting pellets for it. Airguns are great for smal game (pidgeons) and totally silent. Also they can be lethal if used at a short enough range with enough accuracy (aim for the head).

SmokyGod
Saturday, May 19th, 2007, 05:47 AM
may i also add that while $500 cash may seem like a good idea, when paper money devaluates like the Deutschmark after War 1 (and it will), i would much rather have gold or, ideally, $500 worth of .22 Long Rifle cartridges. All transactions after SHTF will be in bullets, gold, tobacco, whiskey, gasoline, opium, etc. Paper money will be little more tha intricatley decorated toilet paper.

A Katadyn Hiker Pro would be a much better investment.