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View Full Version : Warning of Obesity Risks to Entire Generation



Praetorianer
Friday, January 26th, 2007, 11:49 PM
An entire generation of children now at primary school is heading towards increased rates of serious health problems, an influential committee of MPs says today.

It criticises the departments of Health and Education and Skills for doing too little to stem the "alarming" obesity epidemic. At least one primary school child in seven is now classed as obese.

The report from the Public Accounts Committee says obesity costs the nation around 3.5 billion, which will rise to 4.5 billion in three years if the trends continue.

Parents should be told when their children weigh in as overweight or obese, they say, overruling fears that children would be stigmatised.

"If a primary school finds that a child is overweight or obese then the parents must be informed," Edward Leigh, the chairman of the committee, said. "To do otherwise would be to keep parents in the dark about possible serious health risks to their children."

The report says obesity among two- to 10-year-olds rose from 9.9 per cent in 1995 to 13.4 per cent in 2004. Mr Leigh said: "Unless we act, the proportion of children who are obese will increase rapidly."

But changing the behaviour of children and their parents was "tricky territory", he added. "It is therefore all the more urgent that the departments involved work together to set a clear direction."

The Public Accounts Committee identified a "complex" chain for tackling childhood obesity which involved 26 different bodies and suffered from "confusion over roles and responsibilities".

The departments of Health, Education and Culture, Media and Sport set a joint target three years ago to halt the increase in obesity among under-11s by 2011.

Mr Leigh said: "It is lamentable that there is still so much dithering and confusion and still so little co-ordination."

It was revealed last summer that the Department of Health's nationwide survey to measure children had failed because less than half of parents gave permission for their children to be weighed.

The report says: "The department of health had initially decided not to tell parents or children the results unless they asked for them, because of concerns raised . . . about potential stigmatisation and bullying in schools."

The committee had told the department that "failing to tell parents that their child is dangerously overweight could lead to the risk of serious illness or death".

Tam Fry, for the National Obesity Forum, said: "The Department of Health was totally wrong when it decided to make it difficult for parents to find out about their children's weight.

"I am absolutely clear that the parents should get this information. It is essential that they should receive it as of right."

Some parents, he added, were in denial over their children's problem or ignorant of it. Mr Fry praised a system in Birmingham primary schools were all children were weighed and measured as part of learning about numbers as part of the curriculum.

"I want to see this idea rolled out across the nation," he said.

Andrew Lansley, the shadow health secretary, said the Conservatives shared the committee's alarm at the dramatic increase in childhood obesity and the apparently unco-ordinated way in which the Government was dealing with it.

"We are over two years on from the Labour's public health White Paper, with no sign of any progress in halting the rise in childhood obesity let alone reversing it.

"This report suggests that the Government is thrashing about with a series of loosely connected initiatives in the hope of it amounting to a strategy," he said.

Norman Lamb, the Liberal Democrat spokesman, said: "Unless action is taken now an entire generation will suffer increased rates of serious disease like Type 2 diabetes and heart disease."

Caroline Flint, the public health minister, said childhood obesity was a complex issue, as the Public Accounts Committee recognised.

"There are no easy answers or quick-fix solutions. Changing behaviour requires long-term action on a number of fronts and that is what we are putting in place.

"The evidence on which this report is based was gathered in 2005 and early 2006. In the interim we have achieved an enormous amount.

"What we are absolutely clear about is that overweight and obesity cannot be tackled by Government alone which is why we are co-ordinating action across Government, the food and fitness industries, retailers, through the voluntary and public sectors to target action where it can be most effective.

"The Government will consider the report carefully before making a full response," she said.

Calculations for measuring the ideal weight for children are more broadly based than for adults, with a wider range of Body Mass Index, because they are still growing and gain height and develop at different rates.

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/health/2007/01/26/nfat25.xml

ambiorix
Tuesday, March 27th, 2007, 03:34 AM
Obesity can definitely become a problem.

I believe it not only causes health concerns but can also cause psychological problems...
I work with a few guys who are very big guys and they are constantly putting down all of the people around them.... the tall fat one is always making fun of people for being "short" ... and the short fat one is constantly putting people down for being "weak."... basically their negative self-image is causing them to lash out at people who are healthy.

skyhawk
Saturday, March 31st, 2007, 05:36 PM
It can also work the other way.

For instance depression and anxiety can lead to " comfort eating " thus compounding the problems the depressed person originally had.

It's the same with bulemia/anorexia they are pschological disorders manifesting themselves in the physical, so to speak.

ambiorix
Sunday, April 1st, 2007, 01:41 AM
You are absolutely correct. Alcoholism is the same way, drinking too much can produce depression but some people when depressed feel the urge to drink.

Vicious cycle:doh

skyhawk
Sunday, April 1st, 2007, 02:06 AM
The reason , by far , imho, is the ridiculous pressures people are put under in the modern world.
Work pressures.
Financial pressures.
Social acceptance pressures.
Social and domestic pressures>

the list is endless . no wonder everyone seems to be falling down or on the verge thereof.

The media , consummerism , social status etc are very damaging to self esteem and self worth . The lowering of either are main causes in the epidemic of depression sweeping the planet. It's all very sad .:(

ambiorix
Sunday, April 1st, 2007, 02:11 AM
Our world is losing it's sense of tradition, it's sense of direction, and it's sense of reality.

skyhawk
Sunday, April 1st, 2007, 02:20 AM
I am currently reading the book " Affluenza " by Oliver James , a great read on this very subject.

He reckons there are 5 stages people endure before they revolt and that we ( in the western world ) are already at stage 4 !! :O

Gagnraad
Sunday, April 1st, 2007, 12:55 PM
Believe me, it may not be because anyone are depressed or anything that they are "fat" or obese. They may just simply be big. Many people are born "fat".

Look at me, for example: I have been quite big all my life, untill a year/two years ago, when I started to lose my weight, and the reason is depression, that's how I lost it.

So don't blame overweight/obesity mainly on psychology, depression. Some people just are overweight, with no special reason.

skyhawk
Monday, April 2nd, 2007, 12:45 PM
Believe me, it may not be because anyone are depressed or anything that they are "fat" or obese. They may just simply be big. Many people are born "fat".

Look at me, for example: I have been quite big all my life, untill a year/two years ago, when I started to lose my weight, and the reason is depression, that's how I lost it.

So don't blame overweight/obesity mainly on psychology, depression. Some people just are overweight, with no special reason.

A valid point Gagnraad , maybe someone will come up with the " depression diet " , worry yourself thin. :D

Kith of woden
Monday, April 2nd, 2007, 01:22 PM
I think there are various factors for this generation being fat, most have already been discussed on this thread, but hears my opinion. Kids dont play outside as much nowerdays, they are on computer games all the time, there is a 24 hr fast junk food culture among us. Children arnt learnt any self esteem in schools, and the celebrity greed lifestyle is subliminaly bombarding them every day with millions of images, promoting these ethics. We waste food at a tremendous rate that our Grandparents would find alarming.Because we over eat. Much wants more, springs to mind, a concept our ancestors would frown upon when it came to eating.

Kith of woden
Monday, April 2nd, 2007, 01:26 PM
A valid point Gagnraad , maybe someone will come up with the " depression diet " , worry yourself thin. :D


HHHHHAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!!!! Imagine they could bring a dvd out, and it would just be some celebrity reading the News!

Gagnraad
Tuesday, April 3rd, 2007, 12:52 AM
A valid point Gagnraad , maybe someone will come up with the " depression diet " , worry yourself thin. :D
Actually, I think it's allready "popular".

I think a person said that instead of eating etc when you are depressed, you walk or work out.

Me, I usually just eat breakfast and nothing else, and I walk alot.

Let me rephrase that: I spend my waking hours walking, when not on internet.

Since my times of depression, I have lost my appetite and fell in love with something as simple as walking, that's how I have lost my weight. And the "worst" part is that I lost weight without thinking about it. I have never cared about how I look or my health, I just find myself more healthy now than I used to be.

But don't worry, there are times where I eat alot, like Yule etc ;)

skyhawk
Tuesday, April 3rd, 2007, 02:17 AM
Since my times of depression, I have lost my appetite and fell in love with something as simple as walking, that's how I have lost my weight. And the "worst" part is that I lost weight without thinking about it. I have never cared about how I look or my health, I just find myself more healthy now than I used to be.



I am glad you have found something you love to do . That in itself will help to ward off any return to depression.

It's a funny old world !

Kith of woden
Tuesday, April 3rd, 2007, 11:44 AM
Since my times of depression, I have lost my appetite and fell in love with something as simple as walking, that's how I have lost my weight. And the "worst" part is that I lost weight without thinking about it. I have never cared about how I look or my health, I just find myself more healthy now than I used to be.


As some of you are probably aware, when something makes you happy, whatever it is, a chemical reaction takes place and Endorphins (spell?) are released in the brain that "make" you happy. Science has proven that even mild excersise over a prolonged period can release these endorphins, plus getting some fresh air and natural daylight will make you feel better anyway.
I try and walk in the fresh air everyday, whatever the weather, and I work out for an hour 5 days a week. One of the 9 noble virtues in Odinism is discipline, and if I dont go to the gym on a week day, I dont use the Internet. This is my motivation.