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Blutwölfin
Friday, November 17th, 2006, 06:44 PM
E.g. the English people, the American people, the Swedish people? Not necessarily the government or the humanoids occupying your nation's land, a lot of whom are probably aliens for most readers.

Tell me how you feel about your nation.

NatRev
Friday, November 17th, 2006, 08:02 PM
Difficult to explain.

I've always believed that despite elitist sneers at the masses, most ordinary people have more common sense than most of their so-called leaders.

I have a love for this land, yes. It is something sacred. This is why pollution and immigration are two fundamental concerns to me.

Do I love the Monarchy? No. I never have. I've never understood the need for such an antiquated notion. Of course I do believe in a social hierarchy; of talent, skill and competence etc. That is only natural, but to place one family above others simply due to birth is asinine and anachronistic.

Do I love the Government / Establishment? No. Not this current regime of politically correct Arab hugging toadies. Nor any mainstream political group for that matter.

Do I love my fellow English? Well the answer is difficult. As I do not KNOW every single English person and let's face it, there are some pretty nasty sorts in this country as there are in any other, I can't say that I love ALL of them. Ian Brady? Yes he's top of my Christmas card list. :eek so is Ian Huntley and Peter Sutcliffe. :mad:

Do I love English people more than say French or Dutch? Well of course I am concerned with English economy and English culture, homes etc. but no more or less than a fellow from a culturally similar nation, say France of Holland.

Of course there is a natural empathy with people who share a common language, culture and outlook on things, but in this day and age with TV, MSN and Internet etc. it's not that hard to develop close fraternal relationships with people who share similar ideals yet who are from different nations. Just look at this forum for example.

Although I wouldn't want to live in an introverted society that shuns outsiders and new ideas, I do like the idea of a more *tribal* society. I think this is natural. Whether I'd want this ideal *tribe* to consist of purely English types or a mixture of different types yet who share common ideals, interests and beliefs etc. is debatable. I'm sure there are many pro's and con's for both reasons. I think personally I'd opt for the latter option.

Does this answer your question or am I just talking waffles here? :rolleyes:

Walvater Wotan's Son
Friday, November 17th, 2006, 09:58 PM
I love the freedoms I have for now, I love the wilderness. California is more than happy to put you in jail or prison for anything you do even petty bullshit.

So I guess what I'm saying is that I dont love my country, but I like it allot more than I'd like living in israel, africa or korea.

NatRev
Friday, November 17th, 2006, 10:12 PM
I understand.

I'd love this country more if there was more a sense of social justice and cultural pride.

Pørdy Mountain
Saturday, November 18th, 2006, 01:39 AM
I have to say I do love my nation, even though I often find myself criticizing my country and fellow Norwegians. After my trip to America, I realized how rude and uncaring many of us are -we don’t greet our neighbours, and often we do not even know who they are until the day they move. We tend to care more about what others have, so that we can get it too, we complain about everything there is to complain about, but never try to do anything about it. We work lesser hours than our Swedish neighbours, we earn more money –and we’re still complaining. Our government has made it its goal to pass of Norway as a generous country who gives millions to poor children in third world countries, while it does nothing for its own homeless-, poor- and starving people. But, thinking about it - these characterizations could probably ring off as true to any other countries as well.

What is it that I love about Norway then? I love the fact that I don’t have to fight with 43600 other fools for leg room (not always true, but still). I love our nature, the fjords, and the mountains, the small and almost pre-historic cottages that lie miles away from people, far into the woods. I love snow, even though I tend to complain over the actual amount of snow from time to time. I love our history. I love my memories from my parent’s hometowns; I've had the priviliege to be out in rough weather fishing, stayed in a lighthouse on an island for a weekend, hunting, been on amazing trips up the mountain and experienced farm-life at close hand.

Most of all: I love the stories about faeries, trolls and warriors my grandfather and father told me when I was a child. I used to think they were true, and I often sat outside, just looking up to the mountains thinking about what the trolls were doing and if they ever would come down and say hello, or take me away.

My grandfather was fascinated with history, and introduced me to the Eddas. I remember him talking of Dovre. Dovre is home of the Mountain king, the troll that Ibsen’s Peer Gynt parties with. Dovrefjell represents the ancient, the eternal, the unchanging, the grounded. In 1814, when Norway wrote its constitution, the founding fathers formed a circle, held hands and proclaimed: “United and true until Dovre falls.”

For me, that part of history means a lot and makes me proud.

Gorm the Old
Saturday, November 18th, 2006, 04:06 AM
YES. With a population as heterogenous as ours, it is impossible to love every element of it, but I've travelled widely in this lovely country and I have found that, on average, most of us Americans are good-natured well-meaning people. We are sympathetic and we are generous to a fault, the fault being that, moved by journalism, we are often more generous to the needy of other nations than to our own needy.

I don't think that this is publicity-seeking. It's just that, when the media drum it into our eyes and ears that the poor Bangladeshis, for example, are cold and starving, we forget, for a moment that the Navahos are cold and starving also. Our intentions are good, but we're often exploited by pressure groups.

The rural families of the heartland are as good, kindly, decent people as you could want to meet. The urban sophisticates of the East and West coasts can often be as callous, self-indulgent, and obnoxious as those of any other
over-sophisticated urban culture.

Despite urban blight, this is a breathtakingly beautiful country. Its natural wonders are among the most glorious and spectacular on this planet. Do we appreciate them ? Yes, so much so, that we're loving them to death. Limits have to be set on visitation to reduce the impact of tourism on the wonders of nature.

Our history is short, but it has left some very moving monuments. Constant effort is made by the National Trust for Historic Preservation (of which I am proud to be a member) to save as many as possible of them for the enjoyment and edification of future generations. Conservationists have laboured long and earnestly to preserve our natural wonders from degradation by pollution and vandalism.

We are aware of our heritage and, brief though it be, we cherish it. Yes, we have major social problems; we have major economic problems, we fall sort, sometimes woefully so, of "liberty and justice for all", but it cannot be said that we have not made earnest efforts to right these wrongs and correct these problems. I could name a half dozen countries which have done nothing for the welfare of their own people or any others for centuries, but you know who they are.

We're far from perfect, but we're working on it. We are very far from all, or even most of us, stereotypical "ugly Americans. Don't forget that the richest man in the world is not only an American but an outstanding example of generosity who has retired recently to devote his entire time and effort to distributing his wealth where it will be of the greatest benefit to others.

Philanthropy is not exactly an American invention, but we have a better track record in that area than most other nations. John Harkness, a now-forgotten American millionaire, inherited an enormous fortune from his father who was in the railroad business. He never worked a day in his life nor earned a penny. He devoted his entire lifetime to giving away his fortune to charity. Andrew Carnegie, a dour auld Scotsman, instead of being a miser, regarded his fortune as a public trust to be donated to worthy causes.

Before World War II, the Nizam of Hyderabad was the richest man in the world. The standard of living in Hyderabad was wretched. How much money have the wealthy families of Europe, throughout its much longer history than ours, given away for the benefit of others ?

Are we, then as greedy and materialistic as we are said to be ? I think not. Despite very ill-advised presidential military adventuring, this is still a great country able to subsidise other countries who show us no gratitude and to extend our philanthropy beyond our own borders.

America IS beautiful and her people are, at worst, well-meaning. However short we may fall of our own aspirations, WE TRY.

Ælfhere
Saturday, November 18th, 2006, 07:00 PM
If my nation is defined by my folk who live in North America (Vinlanders) then yes, I love them 100%. I consider Negroes, Asians, and Hispanics living amongst us to be separate nations entirely.

As for the United States, it was once a nation but is increasingly just an economic unit or umbrella organization trying to keep the smaller nations together within its borders. Our leaders stupidly trying to make us as diverse as possible yet looking for some common bond we all share to make us one. Freedom usually being the value we can all agree on, but this is not enough since different groups and religions define freedom differently.

Democracy is another valued American tradition. I tend to think democracy is a temporary thing, only useful when a population is hard-working and independent-minded, which ours is becoming less and less.

Politics, borders, and governments change with the times but the folk remain... hopefully.

NatRev
Saturday, November 18th, 2006, 09:01 PM
I think we've all contributed valid points to this discussion.

However, I would call myself a Volkist more than a Nationalist, but I do understand and empathise with the validity of sacred soil.

Yes, the west can seem both too altruistic and at the same time too egotistic. The media seems to concentrate on only one charity and that's the Third World, most notably Africa, instead of alerting people to the poverty on their own doors steps.

Pørdy, Norway sounds awesome! I saw a TV show a few days ago about this guy that reared bear cubs in the wilds of Canada. I have to admit I fell in love with that place immediately, but the idea of mist on fjords... wow, man may build great feats of architecture and send himself into space but he'd be hard pressed to even try to compete with the beauty of Nature.

I feel almost angry at times when I go into the country, odd as that may seem. It's not the country that saddens me, on the contrary, it's the ever increasing Human population* that will soon concrete over this beautiful land that has probably not changed since before the first Human landed here.

*mostly comprising of immigrants and the sort.


Politics, borders, and governments change with the times but the folk remain... hopefully.
Amen, brother. ;)

nordicdusk
Saturday, November 18th, 2006, 09:24 PM
I love my country but i only love half of the people in it.I love the country folk but the city folk i can not stand.Country folk even now live a simple life and never forget the importance of culture family friends and hard work.City folk are ignorent and very few care for anything other than money and personal gain.I was born in the city and thats were i live now but i spent most of my childhood with family in the countryside (the happiest days of my life) and i was raised to appreciate the simple things that make life good and to respect nature.Some city folk live like that too but its very rare where im from anyway.

Gagnraad
Monday, November 20th, 2006, 09:25 PM
I have to say I do love my nation, even though I often find myself criticizing my country and fellow Norwegians. After my trip to America, I realized how rude and uncaring many of us are -we don’t greet our neighbours, and often we do not even know who they are until the day they move. We tend to care more about what others have, so that we can get it too, we complain about everything there is to complain about, but never try to do anything about it. We work lesser hours than our Swedish neighbours, we earn more money –and we’re still complaining. Our government has made it its goal to pass of Norway as a generous country who gives millions to poor children in third world countries, while it does nothing for its own homeless-, poor- and starving people. But, thinking about it - these characterizations could probably ring off as true to any other countries as well.

What is it that I love about Norway then? I love the fact that I don’t have to fight with 43600 other fools for leg room (not always true, but still). I love our nature, the fjords, and the mountains, the small and almost pre-historic cottages that lie miles away from people, far into the woods. I love snow, even though I tend to complain over the actual amount of snow from time to time. I love our history. I love my memories from my parent’s hometowns; I've had the priviliege to be out in rough weather fishing, stayed in a lighthouse on an island for a weekend, hunting, been on amazing trips up the mountain and experienced farm-life at close hand.

Most of all: I love the stories about faeries, trolls and warriors my grandfather and father told me when I was a child. I used to think they were true, and I often sat outside, just looking up to the mountains thinking about what the trolls were doing and if they ever would come down and say hello, or take me away.

My grandfather was fascinated with history, and introduced me to the Eddas. I remember him talking of Dovre. Dovre is home of the Mountain king, the troll that Ibsen’s Peer Gynt parties with. Dovrefjell represents the ancient, the eternal, the unchanging, the grounded. In 1814, when Norway wrote its constitution, the founding fathers formed a circle, held hands and proclaimed: “United and true until Dovre falls.”

For me, that part of history means a lot and makes me proud.
I think my sister sums up about everything :)

And I remember our grandfather telling us wonderfull histories and myths, and father as well... Those good old times, right sis? :rolleyes:

Ewergrin
Tuesday, November 21st, 2006, 01:04 AM
Do I love the United States of America, as a nation? That's a hard question for me to answer. I suppose the answer is yes, but I voted "other" in this poll. I loathe my countries politicians. "Democracy" is a machine that is fueled by innocent blood. Have I benefited from the machine? In certain instances, I'm sure I have, as all Americans have.

I love my countrymen and I love my country. It's the political machine that governs this great land that I despise. I have traveled all over this great nation and met many genuine, hard-working, honest, pleasant folks. I am proud that they are my fellow countrymen.

Uí Fiachrach
Tuesday, November 21st, 2006, 03:15 AM
I love my Country, but not my Nation... As it stands my Country is divided and the majority of the "Nation"(As defined by it's leaders) more or less excepts or could'nt care less about the division.
I am a Nationalist, and until a Nation exists that encompasses the entire Country, i.e. A nation that will fight for the unification of the Country as well as removing the mass of immigrants(who benifit those that rule the "nation" but not the Country as a whole) I will despise the current "nation" I live in.

Mathieu
Tuesday, November 21st, 2006, 03:24 AM
I said "no". But 5 minutes later I thought "yes". I really dislike the way we have become, like many have said before me : selfish, anglicized/americanized, rootless. Social demotratic/leftist to the bone. Even our nationalism is leftist Still, we have alot of qualities ; we will welcome warmly the visitors, help a stranger willingfully and I am sure we would show the same courage than our ancestors if it was needed.

It is just that I get very angry or sad when I see what we have become now...

Arlette
Tuesday, November 21st, 2006, 12:54 PM
I voted other, as it depends on who exactly one would consider to be my "countrymen". When it comes to the rural population of my nation, many of them take interest in their culture and ancestry. The rural population of the central to eastern regions of this country is primarily whom I consider to be my true countrymen, and I do indeed love them. However, there is definitely no love lost between myself and the majority of the brainwashed city dwellers of this nation, its politicians and destructive activists who seem dead-set on subduing and killing off all that I love, and all that my forefathers worked for. There are also, of course, those neighbours in rural areas who have nothing on their mind but greed, and are willing to screw over and sell off their neighbours (many of whom whose grandparents and greatgrandparents were friends or neighbours also) to make more cash; buy, sell, and infringe on small traditional farms for a quick buck. As Mathieu has said, it is both saddening and maddening to look at what's become of things, today. One thing that makes me proud, though, is that the majority of my family opposes these things, and that, little by little, I'm finding more and more people around me who agree with me on these things. Speaking with family members and neighbours lately, it seems there is more and more hope for the future. As the government and immigrants begin to overstep their bounds by giant leaps, people (particularly those of rural populations, who typically will complain about such things but won't do too much outside their social circles) are more willing to oppose the "rights" the government has claimed to have over them, and seem more willing to tell these people where to shove it. When these things were far off "city problems" people didn't care as much, but now it's threatening everything they've grown up with, and what they're fathers have grown up with. Threaten some of the last bastions of rural "sovereignty" and the shit may just hit the fan.

Sifsvina
Tuesday, November 21st, 2006, 09:38 PM
And many people will be suprised just how big that fan is;)
I'm a nationalist, I love my nation, but as it once was and could be again not as it is now. Now it digusts me. There alot of people with the essential qualities still in them but so many are blinded by the media/goverment and the pursuit of comfort. I've gone to websites because they had some item with a really great message and then in another section they have all these Bush worshiping items. :doh Well, I guess I'd rather have Bush than Hillary:eek And then the people who bitch about lack of jobs, the enviroment, outsourcing, and everything made in china and then go down to WAL-MART and buy cheap, empty calorie, shoddy goods. How many of these people actually have the guts to make the hard choices and take this country back to what it was ment to be? Quite alot I think, once they wake from their slumbers. I think the crumbling fantasy of the easy life will force the issue here soon.

Tigernmas
Wednesday, November 29th, 2006, 04:43 AM
I love Ireland and I love her people, my people. So that's a yes.
I often criticize my fellow countrymen for the disgusting, servile, consumerist and ignorant lifestyle of the current generation but I get very wound up if foreigners do the same. It's like with family I suppose, I often complain about mine but if anyone who wasn't a family member bad mouthed them I'd want to knock them out.

Edenkoben
Thursday, April 26th, 2007, 07:59 AM
Like others who posted, I have mixed feelings. This turns out to be a really hard question.

I toured Bayern and felt at home. I've been in Texas and felt totally alien. I've been to S. California and I'm not even sure I was still on earth (same though for Key West).

I love the Great Lakes region--US and Canada equally. And that's what I think of when I think of 'America.' In Wisconsin, something like 80% of us trace our blood back to Germany, Scandinavia, so there's a home-feel here that I didn't sense when visiting NJ, Vermont, Mass., Louisiana or Tennessee. The country is too big to make sense to me; but I could see a Great Lakes Nation.

Gonna have to spend a lot more time thinking this out.

SmokyGod
Friday, April 27th, 2007, 02:54 AM
i didn't vote because i don't like the current crop of Americans, my generation, who, in a few short years, will be the ones making the decisions, but i consider myself to be a Libertarian/Nationalist and i love America, i firmly believe that it is STILL the greatest nation in the world and it STILL has the best political foundation (our glorious Constitution) but the people are hit or miss, depending on where you go.

Stars and Stripes Forever!

Blood_Axis
Friday, April 27th, 2007, 01:22 PM
I am proud of my heritage and History but I loathe and despise what "my" people has turned into.

Edenkoben
Friday, April 27th, 2007, 03:09 PM
I think the crumbling fantasy of the easy life will force the issue here soon.

I strongly agree with you. I keep expecting civil unrest at the hands of those who suddenly lose cable tv or who run out of Oreo cookies (as opposed to those who worry about losing the protections for their human freedoms).

Who would think that the next revolution would come from the enslaved demanding that the enslaving keep up the good work?! And then I think, 'Heck, they're probably too lazy and out of shape to bother with 'forcing the issue.'

Strength comes through simplicity--adding to the 3 F's another: food. Always keep your storehouse full. :jera:

Bridie
Thursday, July 19th, 2007, 04:32 AM
I do love my fellow Australians, and feel a sense of kinship with them and as well as a sense of loyalty to them... although its not something I'm always consciously aware of (its easy to "forget" when one is in one's own home environment)... these patriotic feelings become especially obvious when I'm overseas (as it does with a lot of people).

However, this sense of kinship and loyalty, to a degree, extends to those who I consider "my people" ;) from other nations too. :) (Ie, Celto-Germanics.) So if, for example, I was overseas in India, and surrounded by Indians, if I were to meet an Englishman, or German or Dutchman, I would feel a great sense of relief or comfort, and immediate "connection" with these people, regardless of whether or not I actually liked their personalities. But if I were to meet an Australian, obviously the "connection" would be stronger. Everything is relative...

Ulf
Thursday, July 19th, 2007, 06:32 AM
I love, LOVE!, the tenets my nation was founded on. Freedom of religion is the reason my ancestors came to America. William Penn is one of my heroes. Same with Thomas Jefferson. After learning and reading about the struggles of my ancestors, both in the Revolutionary and Civil wars, I can NOT fathom how far America has fallen from the founding principles of this "Democracy".

I feel greatly saddened and sorry for the things America has done in the past half century, they are not acts our founders would have approved. IMO, at least. :thumbsdow

I can only hope we can change America and make it the great RESPECTABLE nation it once was...

Not everyone in this nation is a dumb ignorant stereotypical "Amerikan!".... A lot of us only want Freedom.

Schmetterling
Sunday, March 16th, 2008, 11:43 AM
We've seen that some members here are critical of their people (http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=5607). So as a contrast, I would like to ask the following question: Are you proud to be a member of your nation? What are you proud about? Can you be both critical and proud of your nation?

The Lawspeaker
Sunday, March 16th, 2008, 12:02 PM
I think that criticising your nation is the consequence of being very proud and patriottic and as a consequence having high expectations of your nation.
I believe that I am one of that type; I love my country and culture most dearly and therefore I have to criticise it's slow downfall and fight it in order to preserve our greatness.

Boche
Sunday, March 16th, 2008, 12:05 PM
Germans invented the most useful Things in Technology on the World. At all, we invented the most Things which are worth mentioning.

Just a few Examples:

- Konrad Zuse invented the Computer
- Semi Joseph Begun invented Magnet-Recording
- Martin Behaim invented the first Globe
- Karl Benz invented the first Car in 1885 for practical Use.
- Emile Berliner invented a system of recording which could be used over and over again and many copies of the original recording could be made.
- Karl Ferdinand Braun invented the cathode ray tube oscilloscope in 1897.
- Otto von Guericke invented the Vacuum
- Johannes Gutenberg invented the Gutenberg press, an innovative printing machine that used movable type.
- Felix Hoffmann invented Aspirin
- Wilhelm Röntgen invented the X-Rays
- Graf Ferdinand von Zeppelin invented the Zeppelin

We Germans also invented the first Wide-Range-Rockets and the Ones used for Space Exploration - and of course the Nuclear Bomb (Although the Nuclear Bomb is nothing we need ;))

In our History we were one of the Best concerning Battles and War. Even nowadays Historial Researchers from around the Globe say that the German Soldier is the best worldwide throughout History.
(And now don't come up with the silly Argument that we lost 2 World Wars - we lost 2 World Wars because we were outnumbered by Millions.)

Germany was the first (or one of the first) Land settled by the Vikings and Norsemen, and it wasn't left by Germanics until today, Germanic Culture and References in German Language to old Germanic Languages still exist in our Culture until today.




Gruß,
Boche

Tauroggen
Sunday, March 16th, 2008, 02:55 PM
National pride is an euphemism for the despite on other nations.

I can see no reason and I can see no need to feel proud of something like "my nation". Furthermore national pride is more or less an underclass phenomenon. Those people try to decorate themselves with the great achievements of mostly single individuals so that they can enjoy the feeling to be in a kind of "traditional line" with those and claim these achievements as their own, just because these people are nothing by themselves and will ever stay being nothing...

Thrymheim
Sunday, March 16th, 2008, 05:56 PM
We've seen that some members here are critical of their people. So as a contrast, I would like to ask the following question: Are you proud to be a member of your nation? What are you proud about? Can you be both critical and proud of your nation?

Of course my point is that while I am critical in private I would never do so in public

Bridie
Sunday, March 16th, 2008, 06:10 PM
Can you be both critical and proud of your nation?As with my family... my children, my parents, my siblings etc... I am both critical and proud of my nation and my country. But also, as with my family members, while I feel free to criticise them, I don't like others doing it. ;) :D Insiders can... outsiders can't. :p Well, maybe that's an exaggeration... I quite like to hear outsider's points of views and observations (especially when asked for their opinion directly), and these include negative ones... but I don't tolerate insults for the sake of trying to make me or my countrymen feel like shit... especially if the outsider is only doing it to make themselves feel superior (which I find is oftent the case).

So, constructive (diplomatic) criticism? Yes. Rude and insulting behaviour masked as constructive criticism? No.

Hierwend
Thursday, January 22nd, 2009, 11:02 AM
I love what America was and what it is supposed to be but not what it is and is likely to become, so no as of this moment I don't love my country.

Dagna
Thursday, January 22nd, 2009, 11:25 AM
I love my nation but I hate my government.

Hauke Haien
Thursday, January 22nd, 2009, 12:21 PM
I have come to despise nationalism and its euphemistic sibling, patriotism, because it is now heavily polluted with American concepts of nationhood, worst of all the top-down approach that defines a people as the citizens of a state. I also happen to hate the values this "nation" was founded on, i.e. liberalism, Westernism and our spiritual enslavement to humanity. This does not mean that I would ever claim to love the Holy Reich or any other political structure, which should only ever function as the nervous system of a pre-existing people that is the source of its sanctity.

I do, however, love those who are my people and I especially love our sacred soil and the wealth of traditions and monuments we imprinted on it.

Kriemhild
Tuesday, January 27th, 2009, 06:54 PM
I can only hope we can change America and make it the great RESPECTABLE nation it once was...
I wholeheartedly agree. I love the roots and original ideals of my nation, especially the sense of individuality and freedom on which it was built, but what it has become nowadays is another story. We need leaders like the ones we had 200+ years ago. :|

beowulf wodenson
Friday, February 6th, 2009, 12:44 AM
The country I live in today, the USA, is not a nation in any meaningful sense any longer if ever it was. The U.S. is an increasingly a Balkanised, multi-racial morass, a 'cultural Marxist' third-world colony held together by a usurping federal government.
That said, I love the idea of the decentralized American Republic as it was intended by the Founders (Jefferson esp.), our Liberty won by them.
I feel a natural affinity for the "truest" Americans: those descended from the Northwestern European colonists and pioneer founding stock like myself, especially the people of the South in both an ethnic and cultural sense.
The descendants of the Founding stock are my nation.
I love what my nation was meant to be, not what it now is.

TheGreatest
Friday, February 6th, 2009, 01:32 AM
My nation is balkanized. I was at the bus stop.... the man in front of me was clearly a semite. The woman who kept staring at me (and flirting with her eyes) was a Greek.


Seriously wtf (sorry I have been drinking)

Papa Koos
Friday, February 6th, 2009, 02:13 AM
The U.S. is too large and diverse to love, and Americans have become a mishmash people, most of whom are strange to me.

I'm a Southerner and cannot relate to New Yorkers, Californians, Floridians, Oregonians, or Nebraskans. Put me in a room full of [European derived] folks from Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and the Carolinas and I'm at home with my people.

In summary (and I'm sad to say) my nation was invaded and utterly destroyed in the 1860s.

Atlas
Saturday, February 7th, 2009, 02:46 AM
Yes and no. I'm more worried about white people around the world than white only in my own country. I don't care if France sinks into the oceans. White first, anywhere.

Mrs. Lyfing
Saturday, February 7th, 2009, 03:17 AM
I love, LOVE!, the tenets my nation was founded on. Freedom of religion is the reason my ancestors came to America. William Penn is one of my heroes. Same with Thomas Jefferson. After learning and reading about the struggles of my ancestors, both in the Revolutionary and Civil wars, I can NOT fathom how far America has fallen from the founding principles of this "Democracy".

I feel greatly saddened and sorry for the things America has done in the past half century, they are not acts our founders would have approved. IMO, at least. :thumbsdow

I can only hope we can change America and make it the great RESPECTABLE nation it once was...

Not everyone in this nation is a dumb ignorant stereotypical "Amerikan!".... A lot of us only want Freedom.

I would kindly agree. It seems you can not only look at the bad...there is to much good involved to do that. There are many aspects of being American I am proud of. If you don't value your nation and find pride in it you can't offer much to improve it.

EQ Fighter
Saturday, February 7th, 2009, 04:17 AM
I think that any large empire will became a Multiculturalism at some point. Simply because the politicians run out of ethnic people they can use as a support base. The Soviet Union was a Multiculturalism and so is the US. But the US and the former USSR share one thing in common, that being a elite groups of very determined Trotskyites that will stop at nothing to introduce and force world wide, their versions of Family, Gender, Race. The current US government has become a complete model of Trotskyism and has no connection to the original constitution.

So no I do not support the current US government, because they are illegitimate, and are propped up by American Leftist.

I would also say that the current US is held together not by patriotism, but by resources, mostly cheap oil and petroleum. That is the real Tie that binds, not nationality.