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Sigrid
Thursday, May 11th, 2006, 03:27 PM
I made my first batch of marmalade today from the citrus harvest of a few days back. I also have eight one litre bottles of lemon juice in the freezer and lots more work to be done as I still have two huge buckets of fruit and two more trees to harvest. Wish I could send you some marmalade to have with your morning toast, but here is a picture instead. :)

Ewergrin
Thursday, May 11th, 2006, 05:32 PM
I don't think I have ever eaten marmalade. But I would eat yours!

nordicdusk
Thursday, May 11th, 2006, 05:48 PM
I used to make jam myself not done than that for a few years now.My mother used to love marmalade she used to eat it every morning maybe she still dose dont see her that much.Its so much better tasting when you make something yourself.Thats also a great picture the way the sun is shinning on the end of the jar.

Sigrid
Thursday, May 11th, 2006, 05:59 PM
I'm powerfully impressed that you made jam, Nordic Dust! :)

nordicdusk
Thursday, May 11th, 2006, 06:02 PM
Thank you i used to love to bake but i dont get to do it anymore.I just do not have the time these days i really must make time.

Sigrid
Thursday, May 11th, 2006, 07:49 PM
I learned to bake when I was about eleven and went on from there. Self taught to start with as my mother died when I was eight, so I just remembered what I'd seen her do and taught myself the rest.

I was a proficient baker by about age fifteen and by twenty a proficient cook. I have been cooking and baking ever since. My favourites were flaky pastry and pastries of all kinds, apple and pear tarts, lemon meringue pies and in South Africa we have a great old Dutch original called milk tart (melktert) sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar. Oh, yum.

Also all kinds of other stuff, soups, pasta, herb cooking, you know how it is, the list is endless and there's always something new to learn and master ... And at Christmas/Yule the pudding and cake and my favourites the fruit mince pies. I confess to being a home crafts nut. I have been a housewife ever since auntie fell off the bus, lol.

nordicdusk
Thursday, May 11th, 2006, 10:43 PM
Yes i loved baking cakes with plenty of fruit.I am well able to cook aswel as bake something i was taugh from a very young age.Cooking is something i love to do.

Sigurd
Thursday, May 11th, 2006, 11:29 PM
Looks delicious! :)

But makes me miss home, since my gran makes such awesome Strawberry Jam, and my stepdad such awesome Peach/Apricot Jam...:(

nordicdusk
Thursday, May 11th, 2006, 11:31 PM
Looks delicious! :)

But makes me miss home, since my gran makes such awesome Strawberry Jam, and my stepdad such awesome Peach/Apricot Jam...:(
Apricot jam sounds so nice.

Sigrid
Friday, May 12th, 2006, 06:21 AM
Yes i loved baking cakes with plenty of fruit.I am well able to cook aswel as bake something i was taugh from a very young age.Cooking is something i love to do.

ND, if you like cooking, why not try it as a career?

nordicdusk
Wednesday, May 17th, 2006, 01:50 AM
ND, if you like cooking, why not try it as a career?
Dont think i would have the nerve to cook for alot of people at once.

Sigrid
Wednesday, May 17th, 2006, 06:22 AM
You would if you were trained and had the confidence to do it. Nerve is about 75% self-confidence and this comes with the knowledge that you can do something. :)

Nordblut
Wednesday, May 17th, 2006, 10:34 AM
I´ve never made marmalade before, but my gran did, and obviously every gran is an excellent marmalade maker :D. It´s such a pity that most of the old recipes and traditional food preparations are about to vanish, because modern women have no time to cook for their family. Even my mother, who is a fantastic cook, has no more the time to be there for me and my little brother, so I had to learn how to cook with about twelve. Well, at least it was profitable for me, cause when I´m away with my friends I am the only one who knows how to make something eatable.;)

nordicdusk
Wednesday, May 17th, 2006, 11:34 AM
Yes i must agree with Nordblut.There is nothing better than walking into a house and smelling home cooking or baking it give that homely feeling.When my mother lived with us there would always be cooking happening something i miss very much.Myself and my dad can cook but its not the same.My grandmothers house always had baking going on to and it was great to just sit and watch as everything came so easy to her and my aunts and they enjoyed it so much.I know that they still do it but its something that is dying fast and its a shame.

Sigrid
Thursday, May 18th, 2006, 07:37 AM
I know what you mean as my mother was a housewife and a grand cook before she died and so I grew up peering over her knitting and sewing and cooking and baking all my life. I used to play under the washing while she hung it up. I can still see her ankle length black boots in winter with the furry lining sticking out of the tops as she walked up and down the line. She taught me most of what has got me through my life and she only lasted till I was eight. Then I had to use what I had seen and learned to go on alone.

It would be wonderful if nuclear families and stable marriages could come back but a lot of work would need to be done in helping modern people to cope with relationship dynamics and family dynamics and I think the educational system would need adjusting so certain important life skills subjects like woodwork and machine shops and home economics could maybe make a comeback where they were needed. Maybe one would need special schools for this initially, which is a pity as private schooling is very expensive. On the other hand if the government could be changed to be more traditionalist and to pay attention to the welfare of individuals and families inside sovereign nation states then these things could be brought back and I am certain that "yob culture" and hooliganism would begin to disappear from the streets and drugs and crime and alcohol abuse would return to more normal statistics.

At the moment the brave new world of the global socialist is causing human societies and communities and even nations to implode everywhere they try and implement their unworkable and dependency-creating policies.

Just my opinion. But many of us have seen both sides of the coin, I'm sure, and this is why we advocate a return to certain principles and ways of life for those who want them. These should be encouraged and rewarded. Also just my opinion.

nordicdusk
Thursday, May 18th, 2006, 09:01 AM
Just my opinion. But many of us have seen both sides of the coin, I'm sure, and this is why we advocate a return to certain principles and ways of life for those who want them. These should be encouraged and rewarded. Also just my opinion.[/QUOTE]
Iagree 100% with you on this one.

Nordblut
Thursday, May 18th, 2006, 12:46 PM
Just my opinion. But many of us have seen both sides of the coin, I'm sure, and this is why we advocate a return to certain principles and ways of life for those who want them. These should be encouraged and rewarded. Also just my opinion.

Just your opinion? Especially for me, as a German, whose society is getting older and older and the families break because the burden of bringing career and family together, this is existencially important, not just for me but for the whole German folk.

Vanir
Sunday, May 21st, 2006, 05:37 PM
I made my first batch of marmalade today from the citrus harvest of a few days back. I also have eight one litre bottles of lemon juice in the freezer and lots more work to be done as I still have two huge buckets of fruit and two more trees to harvest. Wish I could send you some marmalade to have with your morning toast, but here is a picture instead. :)

Exquisite looking batch of marmalade there. Marmalade on toast in the morning with a nice cup of tea is an enjoyable breakfast commonly enjoyed by many I know.

You should try to make some Lemon Butter if you have any lemons left over, that stuff is addictive on toast. My better half has an awesome recipe from her Grandmother that she makes.

Sigrid
Sunday, May 21st, 2006, 06:30 PM
I have no lemon butter recipe, V, :~( but I will try some lemon curd and a lemon scone ring with the marmalade and currents. I used to bake these for a home industries shop. I used to bake milk and pear tarts, French Onion tarts, fruit scone rings, chocolate layer cakes, cinnamon loaves and bacon and cheese quiches for them. I am a cook freak, but I particularly like the old home made kind of stuff.

Nordblut
Tuesday, May 23rd, 2006, 03:54 PM
Well lemon marmalade tastes excellent, though I also like traditional German fruits such as currants and strawberries, which still grow in the forest. In my garden, I have some trees with apples and cherries and hazelnuts, so I do not need to buy them when they´re seasoned :). I´ve got some winter apple trees among them who give small but tasty apples who grow in winter.

Gorm the Old
Wednesday, May 24th, 2006, 03:40 PM
Concerning grandmother's recipes, I have a number of my granny's recipes. They were written with the tasting spoon in mind. Quantities are vague at best: "Just enough so it should taste right" Gee thanks, granny. How much is that ? "Cook it just long enough. " Yipe ! How will I know ? I often watched her cook, so I have some idea how much nutmeg she put in her kjöttkaker, for example. Otherwise, I'd have to taste the mixture of raw meat, raw egg, and bread crumbs to get any idea of whether it would taste right. :<(

Sigrid
Wednesday, May 24th, 2006, 04:26 PM
Oh wow, Egil, kjöttkaker. Brings back memories of when my mother used to make these. They were a family favourite to the point that my English father used to pack away about six at each meal. I no longer eat red meat. But she used to make fiskeballe as well (Don't know if I got that spelling right, probably not.) :)

Gorm the Old
Thursday, May 25th, 2006, 03:43 AM
I used to eat six kjöttkaker at a meal also. If you still ate red meat, I'd send you my reconstruction of my grandmother's recipe. There was a secret ingredient which I kept secret as long as she lived (until 1966) which made the texture much smoother than most other kjöttkaker....My granny never made fiskeboller. Though she was a professional cook, she considered them too difficult and tricky. She always said "Det ta en kunst" ("It takes an art.")...However, we always had fiskeboller at Christmas. Husmor in Norway puts up excellent fiskeboller in cans. My grandmother pronounced them as good as homemade. (She may, however, have had an ulterior motive in praising them.) They are very good, though. I still buy them to serve på Julaften. I heat them in undiluted condensed cream of mushroom soup with a dash of nutmeg.

Sigrid
Saturday, May 27th, 2006, 02:26 PM
That really sounds very tasty.

I didn't get a chance to learn to speak Norwegian or Icelandic because my mother died so soon (she could speak them both as well as English and some French and Zulu). So all my memories of these dishes and other things are through having heard them and I tend to say them as I heard them. There are letters still in my camphor chest to her from her cousins in Norway and all in Norwegian. One of my ambitions is to learn this so I can understand these old letters. Once one of them came with an embroidered cloth for Christmas saying "Hilse fra Norge!" and she put this under the glass sheet on the table along with her favourite prayers.

Nordblut
Thursday, June 1st, 2006, 11:48 AM
You have an interesting family, Sigrid. Why do you live in South Africa?

Sigrid
Thursday, June 1st, 2006, 12:10 PM
I was born here, Nordblut. Have wanted to go back to England ever since but so far no go. So many problems before because one was white (go figure!) and now problems because one is considered too old and too white and also because there are members of families still here who cannot be abandoned. There are old people who are struggling to walk, being attacked, etc. But we have managed to get almost all of the young people out and many of their parents, now it is just us here left in what I can only say is a constantly deteriorating situation.

Still, I am not going to give up on the idea that things can happen and will happen when their time comes. We must just be able to take hold of them as they go by or we get left behind. Whether we get left behind or not, I am still never going to stop supporting the homeland communities so that at least they may have a chance.

My family is full of characters. My Icelandic grandmother was the illegitimate daughter of a canning factory girl in Iceland whose lover deserted her before my grandmother was born. My grandmother grew up in very hard circumstances and was orphaned at the age of twelve. She managed to educate himself and learned to speak English by reading cheap romance novels. She had a whole collection in an old camphor chest. She decided to take a job as a companion to an older woman in South Africa and so set sail alone and came here where she met my Norwegian grandfather who had left his farm home in Norway and come to join the Norse community in the tropical coastal city of Durban. They married and because the Norwegian Lutheran church here refused to marry an Icelander my grandmother lied about her origins and gave a Norwegian name to the minister and they were married. She and my grandfather went on to have seven children of which one little girl died from eating green mangoes. The rest went to war and survived and are now all over the world, as well families in the home countries.

The English family were all from Norfolk and were agricultural labourers, house servants, laundresses, dressmakers and there was a blacksmith and a railway stoker. My English grandfather was first in the Queen's hussars between the ages of about seventeen to twenty and then married my grandmother and came out to South Africa because he got a job caring for the horses of a brew master. And so the circus rolled on and on and more volatile characters appeared along the way, one of which is yours truly lol. :P

Nordblut
Thursday, June 1st, 2006, 12:32 PM
Wow.
You´ve got a fascinating family history... Mine isn´t that exciting. My father´s father served in the Wehrmacht until he got very seriously hurt on the eastern battlefields. He nearly died but a German assault squad found him and though they didn´t give him much chances, he survived, keeping a stiff leg for the rest of his life. He returned to Germany and married my grandmother, and he worked hard and became quite rich. In 1950 my father was born.
My mother comes from a family with a tradition of butchery, her dad died early of cancer and her mother led the butcher shop until he retired. And she´s still alive, I visit her twice a year.

I think my family history is typical for Germans, because our ancestors have all fought in the great war, there was none who were not affected.