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Blutwölfin
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 03:03 PM
Where do you come from, where are your roots? Are you still connected with the customs and traditions of your ancestors or do you have adapted the lifestyle of the place where you live now (if you don't live anymore in country where your forefathers come from)?

Pellonpekko
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 03:23 PM
As far as i know, i am 100 % finnish. Ancestors from western and eastern Finland. Born and raised in southern Finland ;) Lifestyle? Well i´ve pretty much adapted the ways of the "big" city.

nordicdusk
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 03:43 PM
Im 100% Irish and 100% proud.I try to be as much up on my heritage as i can possiably be.

Blutwölfin
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 03:46 PM
Half German (Northern Germany, Schleswig Holstein), half Swedish (Southern Sweden). Born on a small island in the Northern Sea, raised there, in Sweden and on the North German mainland (most of the time), and spent most of the time in these beautiful places. Since my father is Heathen (and my mother "got into it" when they met) I was taught by him a lot about Runes and Northern Mythology.

In my early 20's I moved away from that beautiful place (no idea what made me to) and settled down in Austria, which is also nice (love the mountains), but does not take away the homesickness from me. Still have to say here for some time until I earned enough money to buy a tiny little house with a stable for the horses somewhere faaaaaar more North. :)

Adapted some Viennese dialect through the years. :runaway :D

The Horned God
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 03:57 PM
I was born and raised in the midlands of Ireland as are all of my blood relations that I know of. Some are paupers some are veritable tycoons but none are currently living abroad and all live together within an area less than 100 miles in diameter, only one family lives in the city. :runaway :D

As far as traditons go, unfortunately outside of commercial and pub entertainment and the regional and national competitions a lot of the old traditions and especially the traditional lifestyle has died out. This involved storytelling, music, dance and a culture of calling uninvited at neighbors houses expecting either to be taken in to entertain and be entertained with the above activities, (until their drink ran out) or else be shown the mop, in which case the revelers moved on to the next house hoping for a better reception.

That type of traditional village life which probably persisted unchanged in rural Ireland from the beginning of agriculture, largely died out with my grandparents generation and the introduction of radio and television, electric light and everything else of the modern age which allows people to roam over the planet but lose the authentic connection with their neighbours and the place where they are from.

Sigrid
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 04:24 PM
I live in Africa and so no longer live anywhere near the homelands of forefathers. I am English in culture but as I'm half Scandinavian and Odinist and have a brother well into Scandinavian culture and family trees and so on the ways and people of the homelands remain very much with us in spirit. There are others here who are Heathen and they adapt well the Heathen spiritual view to the landscape here. The ferocious summer lightning storms of the interior they relate strongly to the power of Thor and the runic mystery of Thurisaz. The raging winter storms of the Cape Province they relate to Odin as Storm Lord of the furious hunt. The powerful winds of that lash cape Town are giant powers, the mountains all over the country and the woods and sea and rivers, the open grasslands, the big skies etc all seem to go well with Heathen spirituality, much the way I think it does in America and Australia where there are many Heathens.

Personally, I feel none of their joy at these aspects as I love rain and forests and valleys and lots of undergrowth and inland pools (elf kind, lol). I come to life spiritually only when the fire giants depart and the Vanir rule, which isn't often here unless you deliberately find a place where this is prevalent. I constantly long for England and for the British Isles because of the climate and vegetation that is my natural habitat. Here I feel a bit like an exotic animal out of its habitat. But almost everyone else has none of these feelings and the Boers consider themselves to be no longer European. They admire the heat and complain bitterly when its cloudy and rainy. They have adapted and I have not. :runaway

I want to go home. :~( :~( :~(

Ælfhere
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 05:14 PM
50% German: Baden-Wurttemberg, Alsace
25% Scotch-Irish: northern Ireland
12.5% English
12.5% Scottish: Kintyre

Weg
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 05:44 PM
Well, my heritage is... "Other" (French). I live in the city while my forefathers probably came from the countryside and might have been peasants; so yes, I've lost my roots and I know few on my ancestors' customs and lifestyle. We speak no dialect in my family, we've no special tradition of any sort.

I've hardly tried to trace my family tree so I'm just aware that they were of different traditions and came from different regions of my country; as it's rather varied (but still French) I'll spare you the details...

PS : Er, who's Italian on BuB? I wonder if I have ever seen any one here... :suspect

leonidas
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 06:14 PM
Hellenic with some Italian heritage here!

Alice
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 07:36 PM
My mother was born in north of England, and my father is an American of predominantly British descent, with a small percentage of German ancestry. I was born in the United States, but no matter where I've lived here, I've never felt at home. I live in the desert (!) right now, and while I appreciate its own brand of beauty, it's simply not home. Growing up, I always longed for cold, rainy weather instead of a neverending succession of sunny days. I enjoy magical spring mornings in northern England and relish the gentle rain of an English summer. I totally empathize with Sigrid. :~(

Ryan Kirk
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 08:05 PM
No Scottish option?

Culturally I'm all Nova Scotian (ie. Scottish). By blood I'm half English.

Blutwölfin
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 08:18 PM
Advanced poll now that I found out how I can bypass the limit of maximum 10 answers.. ;)

Weg, I changed your vote from "Other" to French. :)

freya3
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 08:42 PM
I am 100% German, even though I am American. I was adopted as a baby and even though I have not met my birth parents in person, I have their heritage and other info personal information. My adopitve mother(real mom :) ) is 100% Italian and my adopitve father(real dad :)) is a Heinz 57 mix of Irish, German, Scottish and Swedish. I have taken their heritage as my own as well and have made it a part of my daughter's ...

Ryan Kirk
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 09:45 PM
Ach! Sure I'm not the only of Scotch descent?

Alkman
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 11:08 PM
Fully Greek here. Fully Pireot as well, since both sides of my family come from the city of Pireaus (the huge city-port near Athens,due to the expand of both they re considered today as one) for the last 3 generations.

Blood_Axis
Wednesday, March 29th, 2006, 01:23 AM
3/4 Greek, 1/4 English for me :)

Gagnraad
Wednesday, March 29th, 2006, 02:02 AM
100% Norwegian ;)

SouthernBoy
Wednesday, March 29th, 2006, 03:41 AM
I am 15/16th English and 1/16th Irish. :)

newenstad
Friday, March 31st, 2006, 12:54 PM
German. ;)

Gorm the Old
Friday, March 31st, 2006, 03:37 PM
My mother's side of the family is Norwegian. My mother was born in Stavanger, but most of the family came from the village of Ytre Arne near Bergen.I am a Life Member and Past President of Lodge 474 of Sons of Norway and have cherished my Norwegian heritage, For example, I try always to attend, and I used to march
in the Syttende Mai parade in Brooklyn, NY. I always celebrate Christmas in the Norwegian fashion as we did at home (in Connecticut) in my childhood. My father's side of the family originated in Wales long ago but spent so long in Massachusetts that no aspect of their Welsh heritage has survived. Except for me, that side of the family is now extinct.

Allenson
Friday, March 31st, 2006, 09:01 PM
Well, my surname is Scottish but other than that, I have little Scotsman in my background.....call it the direct paternal line. ;)

Otherwise, I am predominantly of English (New England) and Dutch (New Netherlands--now known as New York State [upstate]) heritage. I also have a smidgen of Danish, a dash of Norwegian, three tablespoons of German and one tablespoon of Irish. ;)

Typically white American, really.

Siegfried
Monday, April 3rd, 2006, 07:45 PM
Dutch. Born, raised, and living in the Netherlands. :)

Mathieu
Monday, April 3rd, 2006, 10:47 PM
Where do you come from, where are your roots? Are you still connected with the customs and traditions of your ancestors or do you have adapted the lifestyle of the place where you live now (if you don't live anymore in country where your forefathers come from)?

My family has been in Canada since the late 1600s. Almost all of them came from Normandy (my mother's family name has Scandinavian origins), plus some from Germany in the 1800s.

I'm now living in France, as I came here to rediscover my European heritage. Well, I hoped to, but what I found here is sadly not too different from what I knew in Canada. There is simply almost nothing traditional here anymore. I can't say I have adapted to the French lifestyle, and through my travels, I felt much more at home in Scandinavia, and especially in England/United Kingdom. As a French-Canadian "nationalist", it was less a shock to discover that we are mentally close to the British (normal, we have lived together since the last 250 years or so) than to find out how little French we are. Its probably because we are more Norman than French.

An interesting remaining tradition in French-Canada is the summer solstice feast : we still celebrate it, with huge fires, each village or family having its fire. Its a dead tradition in France.

Now, I long for my country... All this time away from there made me realise that its my real home, and that my roots are also there.

Eisenmann
Monday, April 3rd, 2006, 11:49 PM
Dutch. Born, raised, and living in the Netherlands. :)
I second that. :)

Mead Devourer
Tuesday, April 4th, 2006, 12:02 AM
German
Lithuanian
Polish
Austrian

very little Irish, Italian, 1/16 Cheyenne Native American

Weg
Tuesday, April 4th, 2006, 01:14 AM
Almost all of them came from Normandy (my mother's family name has Scandinavian origins)

Hmm, I've read something similar about one of my great grand mother's... What seems strange to me given that lastnames, in France, began to appear in the XIth century (but moslty in the XIIIth), a time at which the norse language had disappeared already (from what I've read it had been replaced by Romance after two generations). But I keep in mind Scandinavian names like Surcouf do exist. In fact I've read the two opposing versions...


There is simply almost nothing traditional here anymore.

We're waiting for a revival. Wait and see...


and especially in England/United Kingdom.

Quite interesting.


As a French-Canadian "nationalist", it was less a shock to discover that we are mentally close to the British (normal, we have lived together since the last 250 years or so) than to find out how little French we are.

French persist in believing Québecois (or French-Canadian, as you wish) are our cousins. They indeed are, but overall Americans to me. You are certainly closer to A-S than modern Normans are to A-S.


Its probably because we are more Norman than French.

Or because you are simply Americans?


An interesting remaining tradition in French-Canada is the summer solstice feast : we still celebrate it, with huge fires, each village or family having its fire. Its a dead tradition in France.

Hmm, most of the time it is; however, the "Feux de la Saint-Jean" (solstice for other members) still survive here and there in France. I went in one of those popular gathering in Eastern France a few years ago (a festivity organized by a small town, nothing to do with a solstice organized by right-wingers), so say it's at the point of death rather than literally dead (even though there is few religious/spiritual meaning left, still it is seen as traditional by the locals). Besides good people there were some young ethnomasochists among the locals...

brian
Tuesday, April 4th, 2006, 04:06 AM
I am around 7/8 Norwegian and 1/8 Lappish (my great grandmother on my father's side was quite noticeably Lappish.) My family came from around Kristiansand, Norway (my father's side) and from around Mandal, Norway (my mother's side.) They were mostly farmers, except my great grandfather on my father's side, who was a fisherman. Both came here to New York during the 20's.

My grandfather on my father's side came to America with his farm name. However illustrious it sounded, someone, somewhere could not pronounce it, or something of the sort, requiring him to drop it for a more common surname. It is sort of nice my mother's side didn't have to drop the farm names. :)

My parents (particularly my father) has kept that little flame of heritage alive, where he could, during my childhood, with the occasional delicacies, Norwegian Christmases, etc. Unfortunately, all my grandparents died either before I was born or died when I was young, so I couldn't extract bits of their knowledge and spirit of the old country in a way that would be meaningful to me.

I still have some distant relatives there, on both sides of the family. I only met a few of them, but it was quite awhile ago.

(To Egil Skallagrimsson: I live a short walk away from where the annual May 17th parade ends up. ;) )

Mathieu
Tuesday, April 4th, 2006, 06:56 PM
French persist in believing Québecois (or French-Canadian, as you wish) are our cousins. They indeed are, but overall Americans to me. You are certainly closer to A-S than modern Normans are to A-S.

[...]

Or because you are simply Americans?



Probably. I have never really talked to a Norman. But from reading Lucien Musset's essays in which he compares the "modern" (60-100 years ago or so) Normans and the Scandinavians, it seems we are/were still quite similar to the Normans. But for sure the North American/Brittish influence has also shaped us.


Hmm, most of the time it is; however, the "Feux de la Saint-Jean" (solstice for other members) still survive here and there in France. I went in one of those popular gathering in Eastern France a few years ago


I'm quite pleased to read this. Last year i've searched for real activities like that (ie not organised by right-wing orgs) but I've found nothing. Sadly in Québec is less and less nice, as now we have very interesting St-Jean parades lead by africans, followed by amerinds and gay pride participants, but is it surprising?

Sigrid
Wednesday, April 5th, 2006, 06:35 AM
Probably. I have never really talked to a Norman. But from reading Lucien Musset's essays in which he compares the "modern" (60-100 years ago or so) Normans and the Scandinavians, it seems we are/were still quite similar to the Normans. But for sure the North American/Brittish influence has also shaped us.



I'm quite pleased to read this. Last year i've searched for real activities like that (ie not organised by right-wing orgs) but I've found nothing. Sadly in Québec is less and less nice, as now we have very interesting St-Jean parades lead by africans, followed by amerinds and gay pride participants, but is it surprising?

Have you ever looked at the Norman Heathens? They are based in America.

http://normannii.org/

Mathieu
Wednesday, April 5th, 2006, 08:39 PM
Have you ever looked at the Norman Heathens? They are based in America.

http://normannii.org/

I didn't know them, thank you for the link, I will visit their site now :)

BSLW
Tuesday, August 22nd, 2006, 01:52 AM
I'm a mutt.

Mom's side- Serbian, Russian, Latvian, Georgian, German
Father's Side- Cornish, Serbian, Latvian, Russian, German,

Loyalist
Friday, July 13th, 2007, 02:58 AM
My paternal grandfather was Scottish, Irish, and German (family came here in the late 19th century), while my paternal grandmother is completely English (her family emigrated before World War II). My maternal grandfather was completely Irish, all of his grandparents having come with a large wave of settlers from Monaghan, Ireland. Finally, my maternal grandmother was mostly Welsh with distant English and German roots.

Huzar
Friday, July 13th, 2007, 06:17 PM
OCCITAN.............Gallo-romance

Schlosser
Thursday, February 19th, 2009, 10:34 PM
I am Swiss, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish, and also Lapplandish.

xamarth
Sunday, April 11th, 2010, 01:45 AM
My mother's family is very English. There apparently are some Austrian relatives way back that she talks of every now and then.

My father is Swiss, from Zürich. His entire family has lived in the region since he can remember and doesn't recall having any relatives (besides a French step-brother) who don't come from Germanic Switzerland.

So that makes up my blood. I was born in South Africa and raised here and so haven't had much contact with my European heritage. My grasp of German isn't too bad (I can survive easily in a German-speaking country) but I guess my culture is South African though admittedly I don't like the culture here too much. When I went to Switzerland last year for a holiday I felt a lot different and happier. I know that as soon as I get my degree I will leave Africa for Europe. I know I belong there even though I will always be a little wanting for South Africa.

Morke Herulf
Friday, April 1st, 2011, 03:00 AM
I am Canadian, of predominantly French heritage, with a dash of British and Scottish and a pinch Algonquian.


There are traditions that remain in French Canadian culture ( mostly in Quebec), the Feux de la St-Jean is one. And it is interesting to note that several normanisms ( words of Norman origin) have survived in joual ( French Canadian popular language). But I definitely note a difference between my generation and my grandparents' generation. To my grandparents who baked their own bread, made their own preserves and served traditional cooking to my generation who goes at the pataterie ( a corner restaurant that serves fries) to get a poutine. I even see a difference from my childhood, from when my mother made preserves from the raspberries we picked from our garden, the stew she made when I was a child with cabbage, carrots, turnip and a boiled hen. I remember the cipaille ( a meat pie filled with meat and potatoes, my grandmother would often add goose or deer my grandpa hunted) my grandmother would cook for the New Year, always served with homemade bread, vegetable soup and pickled beets, yummy!!! Much better than poutine!

French Canada ( particularly Quebec) has however a lot of artisanal products. Artisanal cheeses, beers, meads and preserves are very good. Also, mead lovers, it is much easier to find mead in Quebec than in Ontario and there are more varieties on the market. I live in Ottawa and often go to Gatineau to shop for products I cannot find in Ottawa

TXRog
Friday, April 1st, 2011, 04:26 AM
I am exactly 50% German and 50% Irish.
My father's father was German and his mother Irish.
Conversely, my mother father was Irish and her mother was German.
If I may be so bold as to ask, I would welcome any of my learned Germanic brothers and sisters here on the forum to "classify" me. (see photo attached).
No disrespect to my good friend Anlef (who has already classified me).
I would just like to obtain additional information on this matter and see what the concensus is among you.
Thank you very much.

Linden
Sunday, April 3rd, 2011, 05:24 PM
My ancestry is entirely English on my fathers side. My mother has a small amount of Norwegian influence dating back to the 18th century, but other than that, entirely English. A little boring when you compare it to the American members of this forum I guess :D

Hamar Fox
Monday, April 4th, 2011, 06:34 PM
My ancestry is entirely English on my fathers side. My mother has a small amount of Norwegian influence dating back to the 18th century, but other than that, entirely English. A little boring when you compare it to the American members of this forum I guess :D

Why do people always say this? How is purity boring? I'd rather be pure than have any Eastern or Southern European in me. Americans are lucky if they only have North-Western European heritage.

Although the perceived 'boringness' of English ancestry is probably the reason that I've noticed a lot of English people lie about their heritage these days, much like Americans who lie about having Native American ancestry.

Linden
Monday, April 4th, 2011, 07:05 PM
Why do people always say this? How is purity boring? I'd rather be pure than have any Eastern or Southern European in me. Americans are lucky if they only have North-Western European heritage.

Although the perceived 'boringness' of English ancestry is probably the reason that I've noticed a lot of English people lie about their heritage these days, much like Americans who lie about having Native American ancestry.

To a degree you're right, but I cannot even say I'm pure English because of the small Norwegian influence. My ancestry is pretty dull. One half were farmers for as long as records go back...perhaps not the most interesting story.

Hamar Fox
Monday, April 4th, 2011, 07:54 PM
To a degree you're right, but I cannot even say I'm pure English because of the small Norwegian influence. My ancestry is pretty dull. One half were farmers for as long as records go back...perhaps not the most interesting story.

Well, that's the thing. People think that having ancestry from different parts of the continent or even the world is interesting in and of itself. I'd hate to have ancestry outside of Western Europe, and when people tell me they have some (no doubt with the intention of impressing me) I just think to myself "yuck."

Nothing made me happier than finding out my ancestral heritage was really 'undiverse'. Basically, Irish and a drop of Welsh is exotic as my ancestry gets, and that's enough for me.

Linden
Tuesday, April 5th, 2011, 06:33 PM
Well, that's the thing. People think that having ancestry from different parts of the continent or even the world is interesting in and of itself. I'd hate to have ancestry outside of Western Europe, and when people tell me they have some (no doubt with the intention of impressing me) I just think to myself "yuck."

Nothing made me happier than finding out my ancestral heritage was really 'undiverse'. Basically, Irish and a drop of Welsh is exotic as my ancestry gets, and that's enough for me.

Don't get me wrong, I'm very proud of my heritage. I find it quite interesting how so many Americans have 'pure' Germanic ancestry, and I like to discuss it. However, I also think to myself ''yuck'' when people seem to think they have ancestors from pretty much every country.

Granraude
Tuesday, April 5th, 2011, 07:27 PM
I just think to myself "yuck."


Am I icky then? =P

Norwegian, possibly some Swedish, and Italian (from the 1800's or so)

Linden
Tuesday, April 5th, 2011, 07:42 PM
Am I icky then? =P

Norwegian, possibly some Swedish, and Italian (from the 1800's or so)

I think what he means by this is that an individual may believe their ancestry is better than an other individuals because their heritage is more diverse?

Hesse
Wednesday, April 6th, 2011, 04:49 AM
Well, that's the thing. People think that having ancestry from different parts of the continent or even the world is interesting in and of itself. I'd hate to have ancestry outside of Western Europe, and when people tell me they have some (no doubt with the intention of impressing me) I just think to myself "yuck."

I'm here with ya, Fox. While I don't think that ancestry in other parts of the continent are so bad, I really fail to see what's so "interesting" about having ancestry outside of Europe, to me it's kinda disgusting and I yea, I also do think "yuck" (especailly with black ancestry), and its not at all something to be proud of. Why people think like that I have no idea. Whats so impressive about being descended from inferior people and cultures?


I think that political correctness is to thank for that.

I'm proud to be pure European and proud to say I have a rather dull heritage and can't impress certain people with the "ever so great" coloured mongrel ancestor. I have ancestry in several corners of Europe, nothing east of Sudetenland though, and that's Germanic.


Am I icky then? =P

Norwegian, possibly some Swedish, and Italian (from the 1800's or so)

Italian I don't find gross, but non european ancestry especially african ancestry would be quite gross I think.



I think what he means by this is that an individual may believe their ancestry is better than an other individuals because their heritage is more diverse?

Diversity is evil!

Ælfrun
Wednesday, April 6th, 2011, 05:07 AM
Norwegian/Irish Canadian ^^

Melisande
Wednesday, April 6th, 2011, 06:00 AM
The poll isn't clear to me. Is it linguistic, nationalistic, cultural or other? I have lots of different strands - as do most people who actually have DNA or genealogical research to go by. How far back should we go?

The most common ancestry on my tree is Frankish. English (whatever that is - Anglo-Saxon-Keltic?) is next. Bretagne/Aquitane barely ahead of Langobard and Neustrian.

You tell me.

The Aesthete
Wednesday, April 6th, 2011, 06:05 AM
Granraude I wouldn’t put so much emphasis on your distant Italian ancestry, you certainly don’t look it

Personally besides Northern Italians like the Lombards I identify little with them, wishing they preserve their own cultural and racial identity and not ruining ours.

Stanley
Wednesday, April 6th, 2011, 06:24 AM
The poll isn't clear to me. Is it linguistic, nationalistic, cultural or other? I have lots of different strands - as do most people who actually have DNA or genealogical research to go by. How far back should we go?

The most common ancestry on my tree is Frankish. English (whatever that is - Anglo-Saxon-Keltic?) is next. Bretagne/Aquitane barely ahead of Langobard and Neustrian.

You tell me.

I'd say, for Americans, this poll is best answered with the nations your ancestors emigrated from.

1/2 Irish, 1/4 English, 1/4 Swedish here.

Granraude
Friday, April 8th, 2011, 01:38 AM
Granraude I wouldn’t put so much emphasis on your distant Italian ancestry, you certainly don’t look it

Personally besides Northern Italians like the Lombards I identify little with them, wishing they preserve their own cultural and racial identity and not ruining ours.

Oh, I don't put much emphasis on it ^^

Stated the icky stuff as a joke, hehe.

Melisande
Sunday, April 10th, 2011, 07:11 PM
If it's about which nations my ancestors immigrated from, then I'm English, German, French and Scot.

The English ancestors came rather early (1620s and 1630s) and were themselves of mostly Norman and Bretagne ancestry, as were my French ancestors. They identified exclusively as English, though, and did a remarkable job marrying only other English people (not even a bit Irish) until grandma hooked up with German grandpa.

Schubert
Sunday, April 10th, 2011, 07:29 PM
63% English, 19% French-Swiss, 12% Italian-Swiss, 6% German.

karlstar
Tuesday, April 19th, 2011, 06:40 PM
My grandparents are both Flemish although they were both born in England.
My Grandmother has no knowledge of Dutch however my Grandfather could speak Dutch and Afrikaans fluently and served in Suid-Afrika in WW2 because of his knowledge of the language. My mother doesn't speak any Dutch and was raised in London.
On my father's side my grandmother is Protestant Northern Irish and my grandfather is English.

I guess that makes me mostly Flemish and Anglo-Irish. :)