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Slå ring om Norge
Tuesday, March 7th, 2006, 11:46 AM
He he, take this with a clip of S.A.L.T. (salt) please...

Some of them, at least those I have seen are elementals, of the element earth, but probably divided in subdivisions according to subelements as earth of earth, water of earth usw.

There are also various classes of <underjordiske>, "underearthlings", we have trolls, dwarfs and nisser. Nisser are in english translated with elfs, I am not sure that is correct, because alver (elfs) are known to be swift and rapid, and of light physical apperarance. More like of the element air.

Those I have seen, were grayish, and rough buildt, and a bit smaller than humans. On early morning at sunrise, I observed a family of trolls returning to their home. They just walked into the large rock, that in shape looked a little like a human house.

It seemed like a fathertroll, a mothertroll, and children, they were more cloudy and undefineable. They did not notice me, I think.

This were right outside of town, so they were used to humans, and relative civilized. The large trolls lives far away from the humans, and are not seen in town. In the shady clifts of faraway mountains for example, could we maybe find such, but they are shy to humans.

Lesser elementals, like socalled nisser and dverger, (elfs and dwarfs) may also live at farms, or in connection to houses that lies by themselves, and lightly near to natural places that attracts trolls, a large rock, a berg, a step hill, a clift or a cave.

Those living in town are from what I have seen dverger (dwarfs), grayish and rarely more than 1.20 tall. They are raw buildt, like they were carved with primitive tools. Sometimes their heads are quite large related to the rest of the body. Not all of them are too cheerful.

They respond to magical rituals, and have respect for runes, pentagrams, and such. They are normally not very willing to step forward, out of the walls, but magical rituals and formulars invokes them easy, and then one may appear at relative friendly terms.

Their temper may often appear to be a little a little grumpy and suspicous, but its their nature, that is not intended to insult. However, they are straigth to business, "they does not go around the porridge".

Some of them can hear very good, and only thinking of them can be enough to awake their attention.

Not by my intention, but since I started writing this, I have been thinking at them, and since I know what to think of, I have awaken the local nisse`s attention. He asks me to send you greetings! Believe it or not... Done.

This one has a large old key that he points at the PC screen with...Aha, he likes the S.A.L.T., a formular...of course, the key to magical salt...
Sonna-As-Lagu-Thurs, SALT, that is elementary.

Execuse me, I must interrupt now according to the unexpected effects of writing this posting...see you later.

Sigrid
Tuesday, March 7th, 2006, 12:14 PM
Hello Thore_Hund :)

My Icelandic grandmother used to tell my brother stories of little wights (I cannot remember what she called them) who could be heard grinding coffee in hollows or cave like places in the rocks and who would stop immediately anyone came too close (anyone they did not approve of or like, of course). Like the leprechauns of Ireland these folk have much time for those they like and no time at all for those they do not.

I wondered if you knew any of these stories' origins. Judging by the way you talk I think you may know more than just the literary side. :eek

I look forward to your response and maybe a response from one of your friendly wights.

Also my Norwegian mother told me the story of "the little man who made salt". The one where there was a little man who would make salt if you asked him "Little man make salt". But one day he refused to stop (I can't remember the reason) and they threw him in desperation into the sea and apparently he is still making salt and that is why the sea is salty to this day.

She also told me the story of Rapunzel in Norwegian. Then in English so I could understand. I just liked to have it in Norwegian sometimes so I could listen to the music of the language. It began with Rapunzel chasing a butterfly into the woods and then being caught by the old hag.

Best ønsker (is that right?) Glad to see you here.:thumbsup

Slå ring om Norge
Tuesday, March 7th, 2006, 12:29 PM
Hei Sigrid!

Thank you for inspiring post!

Hello Thore_Hund :)
Like the leprechauns of Ireland these folk have much time for those they like and no time at all for those they do not.

Neither have I, its either or.

I
wondered if you knew any of these stories' origins. Judging by the way you talk I think you may know more than just the literary side. :eek

I do`t know much of the literary side, but I had grandparents, I too, and I am a half savage close linked to the spirits of nature. I also have some Sami heritage, and those are wellknown as mysterious beeings...:D


I look forward to your response and maybe a response from one of your friendly wights.

Yes, let us see what we can arrange. A late evening, presumingly. :hide:


Also my Norwegian mother told me the story of "the little man who made salt". The one where there was a little man who would make salt if you asked him "Little man make salt". But one day he refused to stop (I can't remember the reason) and they threw him in desperation into the sea and apparently he is still making salt and that is why the sea is salty to this day.

It is a beautiful adventure. I love that one too.


Best &#248;nsker (is that right?) Glad to see you here.:thumbsup

Beste &#248;nsker er helt korrekt! Tusen takk, og alle beste &#248;nsker til deg og!

Sigrid
Tuesday, March 7th, 2006, 12:40 PM
Hei Sigrid!

Beste ønsker er helt korrekt! Tusen takk, og alle beste ønsker til deg og!


Oh hey, I'm so pleased with myself now. I actually understand that straight off. I'm trying to learn Norwegian. My mother died when I was young and didn't get a chance to teach me Norwegian or Icelandic. She could speak both. I have a little book and a tape and I am trying to find the time and also to get the pronunciation right. Scandinavians are rare where I am, so I will be watching you.

Yes, Saami are magical. I believe they taught us a lot of shamanism. I am one of these, but no Saami blood. I like your soul. Liked it when I first saw it on another forum. A sense of humour too. :D A kind lovely visitor you are from way back. Sometimes when we come back we get into the wrong places and suffer and sometimes we are lucky and find souls that know. ;) Of course I am talking in space and time now, not in forums.:)

Slå ring om Norge
Tuesday, March 7th, 2006, 12:59 PM
Hei Sigrid!


Oh hey, I'm so pleased with myself now. I actually understand that straight off. I'm trying to learn Norwegian. My mother died when I was young and didn't get a chance to teach me Norwegian or Icelandic. She could speak both.

I am sorry to hear, that must have been very tough....The sea become a bit saltier I guess. I can barely imagine, but my deepest symphathy. On the other hand, it should be a pleasure to look down at earth, and see that ones beloved child is doing well.


I have a little book and a tape and I am trying to find the time and also to get the pronunciation right. Scandinavians are rare where I am, so I will be watching you.

If I can help you on learning Norwegian, it is a pleasure. I am at both Yahoo/MSN messengers, and I have a microphone. If you have a mic, I can help you with the pronouncion. Just send me a PM...


Yes, Saami are magical. I believe they taught us a lot of shamanism. I am one of these, but no Saami blood. I like your soul. Liked it when I first saw it on another forum. A sense of humour too. :D A kind lovely visitor you are from way back. Sometimes when we come back we get into the wrong places and suffer and sometimes we are lucky and find souls that know. ;) Of course I am talking in space and time now, not in forums.:)

Hmmm...Believe me, I like you too. Thank you for the kind words.:)

Sigrid
Tuesday, March 7th, 2006, 01:51 PM
Well I had a dream (I was eight) the night after my mother died and I was standing in a courtyard holding a broom, sweeping leaves. I looked up and drifting across the sky I saw in a crowd of clouds this woman's face smiling. I watched them go by. She came, I think, to say both hello and goodbye.

My father saw her early hours of one morning about a year before he died at age about 81. She was standing in the doorway of his room, still young as she looked when he first met her. She smiled. He said he woke up staring at the door and then couldn't be sure if he had been dreaming or not. He believed she had come to say "Soon ...".

----

Thank you for the offer of Norwegian help. I'll definitely let you know when I have enough words for a simple conversation. ;)

Slå ring om Norge
Tuesday, March 7th, 2006, 02:38 PM
When I was 12, I came home one day after scool, and I feelt unexplainingly tired and sleepy, like drowsy. I went into my room and fell immediate in deep sleep.

I was not conscious , but my father told me after, how I scared him. A while after I went into my room to sleep, I came out in the livingroom again, sleepwalking. Still in sleep, I told my father that his mother had died, and then I went in to sleep again. Ten minutes after, the phone was ringing, it was my grandfather, and he told his son that his mother, my grandmother had died.

When I woke up , I did not remember anything, but my father and his wife looked scared at me, and told me the sad news. Well not so sad, she was 81, and died after been fishing, by draging the boat ashore.

10 years later, I died, and came out in a terrible chaos, and I had noone to help me.

Who came through that storm, and took care of be, by leading me to, and through the famous tunnel of light. There is more, but not in public.

I know what is after, but I cannot tell, its impossible. But I do certainly not fear "Death", ha ha. Death cannot kill us, just transform us.

Well, I do not expect anybody to believe me, but I could not care less. This is not possible to discuss. Either seen, or not seen. Such knowledge (Gnosis) is not transferable. But enjoy yourself, before the birdflu takes us all...:D

Sigrid
Tuesday, March 7th, 2006, 04:05 PM
You are a shaman. That experience would, for me, mark you as at least shamanic by inheritance. You should share your near death experience. It's amazing how many people have them. I agree with you that we are transformed constantly, I believe by the worlds of the Tree, through the Doors of the Tree, in a wheel of cycles and we have connections to the dead and that the ancestors are one of the most important parts of our religion and of our life. And so it is with most native religions.

I recently read a book about near death experiences. it was very interesting. Each experience was interpreted by the individual in terms of what he or she already thought they knew. Christians always thought that what they saw was Christ. Atheists saw a light and had various other experiences and a native American had one of eagles and his grandfather. I think we have enough left of our functioning brain to make things conform so some people do. But then you get those who don't conform and just see things and have experiences that seem similar to many others without the cultural overlay.

And then there are the dream travellers ... :runaway

Slå ring om Norge
Tuesday, March 7th, 2006, 04:54 PM
in a wheel of cycles and we have connections to the dead and that the ancestors are one of the most important parts of our religion and of our life. And so it is with most native religions.

When in need, I sometimes use to call on my grandmothers. They comes. But it must be when I really need them, and from the bottom of the hearth.


I recently read a book about near death experiences. it was very interesting. Each experience was interpreted by the individual in terms of what he or she already thought they knew. Christians always thought that what they saw was Christ. Atheists saw a light and had various other experiences and a native American had one of eagles and his grandfather.

Sounds like the title "Life after Life" by R.Moody?, I know that one, and can only recommend it. I recognized the descriptions from the book immediately.
I agree that the experience is cultural related when leaving the earth, but getting the earth at more distance, "things" becomes more abstact, and less infuenced by earthly circumstances. More like universal, or "cosmic" than earthly.


And then there are the dream travellers ... :runaway

I am a traveller, and I sometimes love to visit people in their dreams. Sometimes I manifest distinct wonderful physical sensations. :D Quite ...thrilling.

Sigrid
Wednesday, March 8th, 2006, 06:25 AM
I agree that when in deep trouble they come. Visitors have come to me. But you're right it isn't for every little mishap, it's often only when you are standing on the edge of Ginnungagap.

Incidentally, they are right when they have written that Alfheim has a violet tinted light. I go in dreams often to a pristine landscape whose light is palely violet tinted. I always wondered why this was so until recently I read that this is traditionally an Elf landscape feature. I can fly in these visits, often moving across the landscape very low. It is beautiful, sometimes like parts of Scotland with heather-like covering and placid lakes. Once I came home tumbling down a spiral staircase with many others and landed under a pile of people. I panicked for a minute that I would be suffocated and struggled to get out. I had overstayed the time allotted. :eek

Often if that happens a massive black storm brews and I know it's on the verges of the changing lines and if I don't move and go back (wake up) I will be caught.

Gefjon
Saturday, November 3rd, 2007, 01:42 PM
Trolls are an interesting part of mythology. If what I read's correct, some people in Nordic countries still believe in trolls. :)

Kurtz
Saturday, November 3rd, 2007, 03:51 PM
Here are some others I find nice.

Dr. Solar Wolff
Sunday, November 4th, 2007, 05:25 AM
Could dwarfs, trolls and kobolds be folk memories of Neanderthals?

Leof
Sunday, November 4th, 2007, 06:07 AM
The word 'troll' actually comes from a type of sorcerer. During Christianization the archetype of the sorcerer, dwarf and giant were homogonized as an ambiguous 'bad' thing. That is a good distinguishing factor considering trolls share so much in common with both dwarves and giants. The mountain where the last pagans worshiped in Swden was called the "troll church".

Huzar
Sunday, November 4th, 2007, 09:38 AM
Could dwarfs, trolls and kobolds be folk memories of Neanderthals?


Good observation Solar Wolff. I was going to ask the same thing.

I often wonder the Psychanalitic meaning of myths and legends or their more concrete point of origin...............


In the past i thought all the legends about Vampyres and their prince Vlad Tepes, originated from an atavic fear of the Tall, slander, and violent Dinarid type.............


The Red-haired TITANS of Scandinavian legends (VANIR) could be a residual memory of ancient rugged and unreduced red-haired cromagnoid inhabitants of those regions, while the victory of the GODS (Aesir) charachterized by more human traits blond hair and major intelligence, rapresent the final prevalence of the more evoluted I.E. nordid types...........

Ensomheten
Sunday, November 4th, 2007, 10:50 AM
Actually this is Nøkken http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nix (http://forums.skadi.net/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikip edia.org%2Fwiki%2FNix)

And this is Draugen, the modern version of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draugr (http://forums.skadi.net/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikip edia.org%2Fwiki%2FDraugr)

Boche
Sunday, November 4th, 2007, 07:01 PM
some people in Nordic countries still believe in trolls. :)

Actually alot of german villages do too. My family has put the whole garden and walls full of wooden-made "Waldgeister" (Wooden Ghosts) who hang there to protect from gnomes, trolls and faunus.


When i was a little boy the older people from the village told about a troll in our forest, and believe what you want, when we went walking there there was a huge man who threw stones after us and had debris-looking things on his head and arms (probbaly cysts or tumors), he was around 2,10m tall.
The people tell stories about him and call him "Hahlho".


Of course he probably was not a "troll", more like a diseased hermit, but that's how folklore gets created and i also have "Waldgeister" for protection. ;)




Gru&#223;,
Boche

Dr. Solar Wolff
Monday, November 5th, 2007, 07:03 AM
Good observation Solar Wolff. I was going to ask the same thing.

I often wonder the Psychanalitic meaning of myths and legends or their more concrete point of origin...............


In the past i thought all the legends about Vampyres and their prince Vlad Tepes, originated from an atavic fear of the Tall, slander, and violent Dinarid type.............


The Red-haired TITANS of Scandinavian legends (VANIR) could be a residual memory of ancient rugged and unreduced red-haired cromagnoid inhabitants of those regions, while the victory of the GODS (Aesir) charachterized by more human traits blond hair and major intelligence, rapresent the final prevalence of the more evoluted I.E. nordid types...........

I have thought the same thing myself concering your last paragraph.


Actually alot of german villages do too. My family has put the whole garden and walls full of wooden-made "Waldgeister" (Wooden Ghosts) who hang there to protect from gnomes, trolls and faunus.


When i was a little boy the older people from the village told about a troll in our forest, and believe what you want, when we went walking there there was a huge man who threw stones after us and had debris-looking things on his head and arms (probbaly cysts or tumors), he was around 2,10m tall.
The people tell stories about him and call him "Hahlho".


Of course he probably was not a "troll", more like a diseased hermit, but that's how folklore gets created and i also have "Waldgeister" for protection. ;)




Gruß,
Boche

This is very, very interesting. In England they called this type of person a Wodewose or something like this in Anglo-Saxon. Perhaps the monster Beowulf faced, Grindel, was one of these. I do believe these creatures are real as they have and currently are seen in Northern Europe all the way into Russia. To me they may very well be Neanderthal holdovers inspite of their tall stature. Does anybody else have a report like Boche's?

Aragorn
Sunday, March 23rd, 2008, 12:10 AM
Anyone actually believe in the existance of trolls? And please, dont be shy:D

For me, to a certain extent, yes I do, but not the way they are pictured in books.

Brynhild
Sunday, March 23rd, 2008, 12:31 AM
In Australia, they are called the Yowie. Legend has them inhabitting the Blue Mountains region of NSW and probably other rugged landscapes.

I would believe in trolls inasmuch as I believe in the other deities/supernatural beings, but I'm not sure about their portrayal as dim-witted ugly beings - only because I hadn't given them a great deal of attention.

For Boche - Gnomes are actually perceived by the Celtic folk as being bringers of good fortune and protection, representing the element of Earth - much like dwarves. We have one at our front door. :D

Soldier of Wodann
Sunday, March 23rd, 2008, 10:21 AM
Anyone actually believe in the existance of trolls? And please, dont be shy:D

For me, to a certain extent, yes I do, but not the way they are pictured in books.

Pygmies?

Berlichingen
Tuesday, March 25th, 2008, 05:06 AM
There's a town in Southern WI called Mount Horeb that has troll statues everywhere. http://www.woodenchicken.com/staff/ It's also in the vicinity of Little Norway.

Let me know if anyone visits it and wants to meet up. :D

OneEnglishNorman
Tuesday, March 25th, 2008, 08:59 AM
Always liked this

http://lios.apana.org.au/%7Ecraig/trolls.jpg

Rik
Saturday, April 5th, 2008, 09:50 AM
In England they called this type of person a Wodewose or something like this in Anglo-Saxon. Perhaps the monster Beowulf faced, Grindel, was one of these. I do believe these creatures are real as they have and currently are seen in Northern Europe all the way into Russia. To me they may very well be Neanderthal holdovers inspite of their tall stature. Does anybody else have a report like Boche's?

I suspect there is a Wodewose in the forest close to me.
Because everytime I go there with a friend , he (or they) always say they feel like being watched . And when going to the part of the forest that we never visited , my friend(s) always want to turn around and go back because "there is something strange about that place , and although you see nobody , you feel there must be something".When I'm walking in the forest , alone , I also get this feeling , and I often see a quick , green , plantlike figure with long hair and a beard running before me . I mostly see the figure when I'm looking at the ground or at the sky , and when I look forward to see what passed me , it's gone.