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Sigurd
Saturday, March 4th, 2006, 07:29 PM
Now I am rather surprised that they do not mention the flask of whisky in the sporran! Without the whisky, the Highland Dress is not complete! :doh


Highland Dress

Highland dress describes the traditional costume worn by Scotsmen at various functions and social events. It has been observed by several individuals now that Scotsmen seem to wear skirts. Whilst not entirely inaccurate the correct name for this 'skirt' is a kilt. In addition to the kilt are several other items which are equally important to complete the outfit. Full highland dress is often worn in place of formal wear such as a tuxedo, and in my opinion gives much more individuality to the wearer than the standard 'penguin suit'.


The Kilt

The centerpiece of any Highland wardrobe, the kilt is the 'skirt' that non-natives refer to. It is an intricately patterned piece of material, tartan cloth, folded and pleated to form the kilt as it is now displayed. The sign of professionally tailored kilt is one that sits high on the waist, with a well balanced apron (the flat front bit), a continuation of the tartan pattern across the pleats, and a hem that just clears the floor when the wearer kneels on the ground.


Full Dress Kilt

(see attachment #1)


Semi Dress Kilt

(see attachent #2)


The Sporran

To replace the lack of pockets of the kilt (and to protect the wearer's modesty if he is genetically blessed), the kilt is complemented with the sporran, a form of purse. whether it is a casual, semi dress sporran (as pictured) or a full dress sporran that resembles a ZZ-Top member, depends upon the occasion. Generally a semi-dress sporran will be suitable for all occasions.


The Skean Dhu

Harking back to traditional times, the Skean Dhu is a 6" long sheath knife that is worn in the right sock with the handle showing. Used ceremoniously to serve the Haggis on special occasions, this knife is now redundant for most occasions, and blunted or plastic imitations are now common for safety's sake. Needless to say mine is sharpened just in case.


The Belt

Although it may sound self explanatory, the Belt is worn to add detail to the top of the kilt. The buckle may be chosen with a Celtic or Highland motif to match the Sporran and Skean Dhu handle. Note: the belt is not worn with the Bonnie Prince Charlie Jacket.


The Brogues

The brogues are the shoes worn to complete the lower half of the outfit. The long laces cross back and forth as they are wrapped up the leg and tied halfway up the calf. Kept ridiculously shiny, these shoes often feature metal heels to produce a loud tap noise when Highland Dancing


The Jacket

The choice of jacket is determined by the formality of the occasion. A day jacket may be any colour to suit the tartan, looking rather like a standard blazer. For dress and formal occasions, the choice is between the full length Argyll and Crail jackets or the short Bonnie Prince Charlie jacket which features tails and requires a waistcoat.

Source (http://www.fiu.edu/~rharp002/scottish_traditions.htm#Highland%20Dress )

Ryan Kirk
Saturday, March 4th, 2006, 08:06 PM
My prom pictures from a year ago might be some help in this thread :p

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v253/rykirk/RyanProm039.jpg

Scottish dress is still common in Nova Scotia for formal events and you'd be hard pressed to find an occasion where kilt and jacket isn't accepted as equivalent to suit or tuxedo.

Bhreac
Tuesday, May 5th, 2009, 11:31 PM
I am living in Amerika now,but was born in the Highlands(BenLomand area to be more precise ...I just wanted to say well done sir you're obviously familiar with the history and your presentation was excellent as well as well read! I'm wearing my kilt (skirt right now...) I swear Americans ignorance on the subject is quite amusing and often causes me to laugh. Hootsman brother

Galloglaich
Wednesday, May 6th, 2009, 12:17 AM
... I swear Americans ignorance on the subject is quite amusing and often causes me to laugh. Hootsman brother

With myself being a junior officer in Clan Donald U.S.A. and my daughter competing in various Highland Dance competitions, much of my Spring-Autumn period is spent coming from or going to Highland games/Celtic festivals. I am almost always attired in some form of Highland Dress for these occasions. I usually have a bout of fun before leaving by walking around the neighborhood before departing. It never fails to attract attention. Rarely have I ever encountered any outright hostility, but I've sure gotten more than a few sideways glances. It is kind of amusing.

Astrid Runa
Sunday, May 17th, 2009, 03:09 PM
In Highland dancing, we were required to wear a kilt for dances such as The Highland Fling, the Sword Dance and the Strathspey. For the Flora, we wore a Flora skirt and sash and for the Hoolahan, a knee-length white dress and a sash, too. Aswell as our knee-high socks and Highland dancing shoes.

More Info:


Dress

In Highland dancing competitions, female dancers wear a velvet jacket with gold or silver braid edging and gold or silver buttons, over a white shirt with lace ruffles at the neck. They wear a kilt and tartan hose, and black laced gillies, or dancing shoes. Men wear the kilt and sporran, with a jacket and bonnet, with tartan hose with a sgian dhubh. For the National dances either a national costume is worn, or the costume appropriate to the dance such as the hornpipe costume, or the Irish Jig costume, which is worn with jig shoes. The national costume consists of a tartan style gathered skirt, a velvet jacket of a different style, laced up the front with silver laces and decorated with silver buttons. There is a plaid which is attached at the waistband at the back, and then comes up and over the right shoulder and is fastened with a brooch onto the shoulder of the jacket. Men wear the kilt and sporran, with a jacket and bonnet, with tartan hose with a sgian dhubh. They can wear tartan trews or Highland dress for national dances, and the hornpipe outfit, and a male version of the Irish Jig costume.

frippardthree
Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009, 09:22 PM
I have a friend who's daughter is a very accomplished Highland dancer. It is becoming very sad how Americanized many traditional dance styles are becoming. It's becoming harder to enjoy the real thing in America. Everything is becoming so watered down.

http://www.highlanddancer.ca/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_highland_dance

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/75/Aboyne_05SV_002.jpg/200px-Aboyne_05SV_002.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/95/05_Bel_002_crop.jpg

skyhawk
Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009, 09:30 PM
To be honest I think that having a skirt on with no undies in a country whose national emblem is a thistle and whose armies of midgies could bring an elephant down should show people how brave they are ( or stupid :-O:D )

Zombiehunter
Friday, June 15th, 2012, 03:04 PM
Wearing a kilt gives you definetely more space on whatever you do at parties or any kind of social gatherings.

What do you think of non-scottish persons wearing a complete Highland dress?

twiggie
Saturday, June 16th, 2012, 05:48 PM
I've never had the occasion to wear full Highland dress but I suppose I could at my upcoming wedding. I wear casual and semi casual kilts fairly regularly, much more comfortable than any bifurcated garment.

Angus
Sunday, June 17th, 2012, 05:47 AM
What do you think of non-scottish persons wearing a complete Highland dress?


I'm not very fond of the idea. It's in poor taste, in my opinion. Most countries have some form of their own traditional dress, so they should stick to it.

The only instances I can think of where it'd be acceptable was if someone of compatible ancestry was adopted in by a Scottish family and adapted to our culture or if said compatible person was widely accepted by the locals as something of an honorary Scotsman.

hornedhelm
Saturday, April 9th, 2016, 09:46 PM
I know most would consider it tacky, but for Highland Games here in the US most competitors just wear a Sportkilt. Not traditional by any means but who wants to destroy a $300 custom wool kilt with cabers, sheaf toss and weight over bar? A lot of games here are pretty informal as well and unless youre part of a piping band or dance troupe you can get away with it.

That said, I would like to eventually get a bonnie prince charlie, custom made kilt and the works for the more formal events.

Catterick
Saturday, April 9th, 2016, 11:38 PM
Sorry guys bu the traditional Highland dress was, and is, the belted plaid not the newfangled kilt. ;)


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/5/58/GrantPiper_by_Waitt.jpg/300px-GrantPiper_by_Waitt.jpg

Angus
Monday, April 11th, 2016, 03:46 AM
Sorry guys bu the traditional Highland dress was, and is, the belted plaid not the newfangled kilt. ;)


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/5/58/GrantPiper_by_Waitt.jpg/300px-GrantPiper_by_Waitt.jpg

In almost all cultures, traditional dress does undergo changes at some point in time. ;) :)

hornedhelm
Monday, April 11th, 2016, 04:33 AM
Angus, do you have any kilt maker/ tailor recommendations for when I do make the investment?

Angus
Monday, April 11th, 2016, 04:35 AM
Angus, do you have any kilt maker/ tailor recommendations for when I do make the investment?

Depends on how much you're looking to spend, the usage of your kilt, and etc. I personally have two, one for formal events and the other for informal / festivals. Feel free to send me the details via PM if you'd like. I'm happy to help either way.

Hammish
Monday, April 11th, 2016, 06:26 PM
My family comes from the non-kilt wearing part of Scotland for the most part...

Not one picture of anyone wearing Highland dress going back 200 years, as you would expect, since there were no Highland members...

And the only actual Tartan items we owned were from a Regimental Tartan...

Still I found this strangely disturbing:

http://www.jewishtartan.com/

ManofMann
Monday, April 11th, 2016, 07:40 PM
I find it odd that there's this 'traditional' Manx dress being pushed that includes a Manx tartan and kilt, despite neither existing in Mann before the 1920s and having absolutely nothing to do with the culture.

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2015/08/06/19/2B26724500000578-3186977-image-m-3_1438886488677.jpg

That's also the American who claims to be the King of Mann despite having no decent claim to the title.

hornedhelm
Monday, April 11th, 2016, 08:56 PM
Lets just all declare ourselves King of Mann