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freya3
Monday, January 30th, 2006, 02:55 AM
I was wondering who here was raised in the Odinist/Asatru Faith?

Since my hubby and I were both brought up in christian homes, we are trying to raise our kids differently, but want to instill the Faith for them in everyday living just as our parents did for us. Just wanting some more advice ;) Thanks!!

Ewergrin
Monday, January 30th, 2006, 04:10 AM
I was wondering who here was raised in the Odinist/Asatru Faith?

Since my hubby and I were both brought up in christian homes, we are trying to raise our kids differently, but want to instill the Faith for them in everyday living just as our parents did for us. Just wanting some more advice ;) Thanks!!

Growing up, my parents attempted to raise me as a Roman Catholic, which is odd because I found out much later in life that my parents were both Baptists (my dad was originally RC, and came from a RC home, but converted when he married his first wife.) I was baptized as a baby, but never went through confirmation. We hardly ever went to church on Sunday's, and on the rare occassions that we did go, both my sister and I threw such fits that in the end, my parent's stopped going altogether because it simply was not worth the hassle to them. Instead, they sent us to Catholic school for 5 years, hoping that we would get our "fix" of Catholocism and lessons in morality from there. Morality! Ha! The year after I was expelled, the Principal of the school was arrested for molesting students, dozens of them. I can assure you, he certainly never tried anything with us.

So that wraps up the extent of my Christian upbringing. I fought that institution tooth and nail since I was old enough to begin to understand what it was. I can vividly remember, in the third grade, asking Sister Helen the question, "Who made god?", To which she grew extremely irate and yelled at me, and forced me to make a trip to the office for a good lecturing. Imagine that, being scolded for asking such an innocent question, by a third grader no less! I have often pondered as to why an elderly woman, a Nun, no less, could be so threatened by the simple idea that a child could be inquisitive enough to ask such an innocent question, as though the very implications of the question would have the power to tear down her moral fiber like an axe through a tree!

It all went downhill after that.

I then spent many years hating "religion" in general, and vowing to be an angry atheist. Being as blasphemous as I could was a priority for many years of my adolescence.

I had always loved nature, but until then I never really thought to embrace it as a sacred entity. I loved being in the forest and observing nature, and would often ponder it on an existential level. During my time of pure rebellion, I was exposed to Woden and European Heathenism for the first time. This introduction happened when I read the book The Way of Wyrd, by Brian Bates. I had always loved fantasy books, and I discovered a world that was so much like that, but indeed was very real! I absorbed every word of that manuscript many times over. I began to feel a change in my heart. I had discovered the existence of a faith that I could believe in, and be proud of, on so many levels. A faith that I could relate to, as a person of purely European blood. I had found the faith of my ancestors, and it has been an ever evolving and growing journey since then.

My hatred for Christianity certainly has dimished. I learned that it is healthier on ever level, to focus on the things that I love, and to ignore, for as long as possible, the things that I do not love. I am no longer concerned with the world of Christianity. It simply does not apply to me any longer. Sure, I still get angry when I see outright lies being told by the Fundamentalists, especially when those lies are a detriment to, or an attack upon, things I believe.

But my anger subsides. I choose instead to focus on my family, spirituality, heritage, and preservation of our folkish values. These things bring joy to me and my family, and are all I need to worry about!

freya3
Monday, January 30th, 2006, 03:57 PM
I had always loved nature, but until then I never really thought to embrace it as a sacred entity. I loved being in the forest and observing nature, and would often ponder it on an existential level. During my time of pure rebellion, I was exposed to Woden and European Heathenism for the first time. This introduction happened when I read the book The Way of Wyrd, by Brian Bates. I had always loved fantasy books, and I discovered a world that was so much like that, but indeed was very real! I absorbed every word of that manuscript many times over. I began to feel a change in my heart. I had discovered the existence of a faith that I could believe in, and be proud of, on so many levels. A faith that I could relate to, as a person of purely European blood. I had found the faith of my ancestors, and it has been an ever evolving and growing journey since then.

My hatred for Christianity certainly has dimished. I learned that it is healthier on ever level, to focus on the things that I love, and to ignore, for as long as possible, the things that I do not love. I am no longer concerned with the world of Christianity. It simply does not apply to me any longer. Sure, I still get angry when I see outright lies being told by the Fundamentalists, especially when those lies are a detriment to, or an attack upon, things I believe.

But my anger subsides. I choose instead to focus on my family, spirituality, heritage, and preservation of our folkish values. These things bring joy to me and my family, and are all I need to worry about!

Your upbringing sounds EXACTLY like mine. I had the Catholic upbringing as well, but fortunately, my mother went to Catholic school and was not going to torture us the way she was for 12 years. They actually have always been open to any religion we chose to practice, but they wanted us to practice something.

I too found peace in nature and stuggled for years trying to find a religion to follow. My husband was the one who found Odinism and though he is not much more educated in it than I, we both feel this is what we want to practice and bring our kids up in this Faith as well. We have found more happiness as well, in our family and marriage. I am just thankful for finding the way now, instead of searching continously as I was...just have A LOT to learn!!!

Leofric
Thursday, February 9th, 2006, 04:12 AM
I was wondering who here was raised in the Odinist/Asatru Faith?

Since my hubby and I were both brought up in christian homes, we are trying to raise our kids differently, but want to instill the Faith for them in everyday living just as our parents did for us. Just wanting some more advice ;) Thanks!!

I hope that some of the folks here have been raised in Odinism/Asatru. I commend you, freya3, for your intention to bring up your children in the faith.

Though a Christian, I can offer perhaps a valuable perspective here. I think the way to instill faith in children is to have it yourself. When I think back to my parents, it was obvious that their faith permeated their entire experience with life. Life and spirituality were more than inseparable for them — they were one and the same. Religion for them wasn't just one more obligation in life, like sending the kids to school or taking them clothes shopping or paying the bills. It was life. And that just naturally spread to me and my brothers and sister. For all of us, spirituality (not just religion) is the great unifying force of the universe, and we just can't imagine life without it. And it's always been that way for us.

At our church, they would always tell us all sorts of things to do to teach our faith in the home. We'd try those things once or twice, but they always seemed so artificial and staged. When spirituality is in your bones and in the air you breathe and in the whole world around you, gathering around the table to study the holy writings at a set time every night (whether anyone actually wants to right then or not) seems so silly. When you want to read them, you will — but you don't have to do it on some sort of train-station timetable to live your faith (except perhaps for living in accordance with our natural rhythms). What really teaches the kids isn't that sort of staged event, but really living a spiritual, faith-filled life for them to see as the model.

I was lucky — I think Odinists/Asatrúar are much abler to do this than most Christians. Most of Christianity wants to deny that this earthly life with all its vicissitudes can be inherently spiritual. They look at so much of life and say "Sin!" "Abomination!" To that I say "Hogwash!" Any god that's good enough to worship is too smart to make a wonderful world inherently sinful. Most Odinists/Asatrúar know this — they don't try to lie about what all of us can plainly sense from deep within and throughout our whole being — they embrace it. This means that they're more likely to see spirituality all around them, and as they see it, their children will naturally and inevitably see it as well.

Seeing life and spirituality as the same thing will make it so your faith is always on the tip of your tongue — and it will be there not because you've trained your tongue to put on a good show, but because it wells up from within (kind of like when you eat something really yummy and your belches carry hints of pleasant sweetness, as opposed to, say, chewing a stick of gum after eating garlic but still having the garlic odor jumping out past the minty façade). They will learn the lore because it fills your heart and spills out in your words, and they will connect it not just to Snorri or Hollander, but to everything around them every day — which is how it's supposed to be. Their faith will be their life, and their life will be their faith.

nordicdusk
Thursday, February 9th, 2006, 05:51 PM
I had the same RC childhood by my grandmother forced to go to church every weekend for years.School took it very serious also whish didnt help hated every minute of it.Being from ireland the whole bible thing and love god was always in your face.Been made fear somthing and feel wrong about all that you do is no way to be brought up.Well thats in my experience.

freya3
Thursday, February 9th, 2006, 07:37 PM
I hope that some of the folks here have been raised in Odinism/Asatru. I commend you, freya3, for your intention to bring up your children in the faith.

Though a Christian, I can offer perhaps a valuable perspective here. I think the way to instill faith in children is to have it yourself. When I think back to my parents, it was obvious that their faith permeated their entire experience with life. Life and spirituality were more than inseparable for them — they were one and the same. Religion for them wasn't just one more obligation in life, like sending the kids to school or taking them clothes shopping or paying the bills. It was life. And that just naturally spread to me and my brothers and sister. For all of us, spirituality (not just religion) is the great unifying force of the universe, and we just can't imagine life without it. And it's always been that way for us.
At our church, they would always tell us all sorts of things to do to teach our faith in the home. We'd try those things once or twice, but they always seemed so artificial and staged. When spirituality is in your bones and in the air you breathe and in the whole world around you, gathering around the table to study the holy writings at a set time every night (whether anyone actually wants to right then or not) seems so silly. When you want to read them, you will — but you don't have to do it on some sort of train-station timetable to live your faith (except perhaps for living in accordance with our natural rhythms). What really teaches the kids isn't that sort of staged event, but really living a spiritual, faith-filled life for them to see as the model.


Seeing life and spirituality as the same thing will make it so your faith is always on the tip of your tongue — and it will be there not because you've trained your tongue to put on a good show, but because it wells up from within (kind of like when you eat something really yummy and your belches carry hints of pleasant sweetness, as opposed to, say, chewing a stick of gum after eating garlic but still having the garlic odor jumping out past the minty façade). They will learn the lore because it fills your heart and spills out in your words, and they will connect it not just to Snorri or Hollander, but to everything around them every day — which is how it's supposed to be. Their faith will be their life, and their life will be their faith.


Thank you for the post! I have found so much more spiritual awareness in following Odinism and enjoy it so much! Where when I was going to church it was a chore. I want my kids to feel the same, and if they grow up and become whatever, I feel as long as they have a spiritual guidance of some sort, their lives will be richer!

freya3
Thursday, February 9th, 2006, 07:38 PM
I had the same RC childhood by my grandmother forced to go to church every weekend for years.School took it very serious also whish didnt help hated every minute of it.Being from ireland the whole bible thing and love god was always in your face.Been made fear somthing and feel wrong about all that you do is no way to be brought up.Well thats in my experience.

I know the feeling :(

Why does the Catholic church do that?! I have NEVER understood that...:doh