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Thulean Imperial Inquisitor
Monday, August 22nd, 2005, 12:09 PM
Háfrónska or High Icelandic is a work in progress to create an ultra-pure version of the icelandic language. Modern icelandic has only 16% foreign words (the lowest in the world, I think) but High Icelandic has 0% foreign words and is thus a 100% pure icelandic language.

http://users.telenet.be/Hafronska/
http://d8486.u24.triplus.be/online/index.php


The High Icelandic Language movement has its origin in the Icelandic hyperpuristic circles of the nineties. Its members were inspired by the puristic extremities of the nineteenth-century Fjölnismen and the fanatic translation of Goethe’s Faust by Bjarni Jónsson frá Vogi. Towards the end of the millennium the movement was nothing more than a few individuals who were unsatisfied with the ‘in their opinion’ moderately puristic endeavours of the Icelandic word-commissions. These men went further where the Fjölnismen had stopped. Lists of purely Icelandic geographical names, Icelandicized proper names and names of chemicals were collected. All these efforts culminated in the foundation of the ‘Language Laundry’ (Nýyrðasmiðja Málþvottahús), which brought hyperpurism into the spotlight. The notion that word-building has to be regarded as an art and that those who practise it should be regarded as scalds (nýyrðaskáld), inspired a lot of people and a fanatic circle of enthusiasts emerged. Nevertheless, the hyperpuristic attitude aroused a lot of destructive criticism from the side of the more moderate purists and the radical anti-puristic militants. The discussions were often heated and not particularily friendly. Hyperpurists were presented as a bunch of clowns who had lost all touch with the situation of the language within the framework of the Icelandic society. Some of the criticism went to the nerves of some wordscalds and some of them lost their temper. This, unfortunately, had a negative impact on the popularity of the movement and some members refused to cooperate any further. A year of silence followed and it was reflected upon what kind of strategy should be adopted in the future. The fear that none of their neologisms would ever gain acceptance by the general public combined with the constant rejection of the concept of linguistic purism forced the movement into adopting a different strategy: ‘linguistic separartism’. Criticizing puristic endeavours in an artificial tongue is meaningless since there’s no imposition on the population and every man has the right to create an artificial language and choose its vocabulary. Inspired by the very conservative variant of New Norwegian (Nynorsk), High Norwegian (Høgnorsk), the hyperpurists started the construction of the loan-word-lacking, metaphor-dense Hypericelandic language (Háfrónska).

The bulk of High Icelandic vocabulary is identical with that of present-day Icelandic. When word-frequency is taken into account, both languages differ only a 3%. It has exactly the same grammar, pronounciation, and spelling. The only difference lies in the fact that as much loan-words as possible are replaced by neologisms based upon the Icelandic vocabulary: gíraffi (gnæfingi), páskar (vorjól), etc.. Concepts like ‘málvöndun’ are unexistent in High Icelandic. The language is already as clean as possible from the start. The well-known generalization of the dative at the expense of accusative, the so-called ‘dative-sickness’ is also inexistent in High Icelandic. If one doesn’t master the cases, one simply can’t speak High Icelandic. Yet another characteristic is the strong tendency to replace words by metaphoric or kenning-like neologisms: e.g. ‘meitilskáld’ (myndhöggvari), eldblóm (skoteldur), málferjumaður (túlkur), stálhákarl (kafbátur), málmörn (orrustuflugvél), blökustorkur (flugeðla).


It goes without saying that the achievements by the word-commitees during the last decades spares us from a lot of work. We can fully concentrate on the part of the Icelandic vocabulary that has been left unpurified: geographical names, proper names, names of chemicals, minerals, ect.

Languages free of foreignisms don’t exist. From a linguistic point of view, there is no such thing as a ”pure” language. All languages (even High Icelandic) have borrowings. But there is a difference between purity and originality. A word like ‘sinkbróðir’ for ‘cadmium’ contains a loan-word, but the compound as a whole is unique in the world. In a way, this kind of genuineness could be interpreted as a form of purity. Still the High Icelandics aim at reducing as much as possible the foreign words in Icelandic that were borrowed after the first written texts. The exclusion of many words won’t necessarily lead to language impoverishment. In order to avoid that, a large part of obsolete Old Norse vocabulary will be resurrected. The result will be a hyperpure variant of modern Icelandic.

Top (http://d8486.u24.triplus.be/online/load.php?page=preface_eng#top_preface)

It goes without saying that the achievements by the word-commitees during the last decades spares us from a lot of work. We can fully concentrate on the part of the Icelandic vocabulary that has been left unpurified: geographical names, proper names, names of chemicals, minerals, ect.

Languages free of foreignisms don’t exist. From a linguistic point of view, there is no such thing as a ”pure” language. All languages (even High Icelandic) have borrowings. But there is a difference between purity and originality. A word like ‘sinkbróðir’ for ‘cadmium’ contains a loan-word, but the compound as a whole is unique in the world. In a way, this kind of genuineness could be interpreted as a form of purity. Still the High Icelandics aim at reducing as much as possible the foreign words in Icelandic that were borrowed after the first written texts. The exclusion of many words won’t necessarily lead to language impoverishment. In order to avoid that, a large part of obsolete Old Norse vocabulary will be resurrected. The result will be a hyperpure variant of modern Icelandic.

The similarity between Icelandic and its extreme twin-sister is reflected in the design of their flags. Both are characterized by a sky-blue background-colour with in the middle a fiery-red symbol outlined in snow-white. Since speakers of High Icelandic lay special emphasis on language archaization, the representive symbol dates from the prechristian era. The thunderhammer, widely accepted as thé symbol of the Old Norse culture, was an obvious choice. The symbol is stylized in the same way as the cross in the existing flag. Every vexillologist should immediately recognize the Icelandic nature of the flag.

It is, however, unfortunate that present-day use use of ancient pagan symbols is immediately linked up with the fascistic world of thought. In this respect, the Old Norse hammer-symbol would excellently fit Scandinavian neo-nazism, which is regrettably already an afterstatement. The maculation of beautiful ancient symbols by totalitarian regimes is a disgrace and people should continue to appreciate this cultural inheritance for what it really signified before it was abused. A healthy form of nationalism that does NOT require contempt of other cultures DOES exist and there’s no reason why these symbols couldn’t be part of it.

Top (http://d8486.u24.triplus.be/online/load.php?page=preface_eng#top_preface)

We emphasize that we are completely neutral as regards politics and religion. We have not in the least anything against the christian faith or whatever religious faith or political ideology. The High Icelandic language movement is merely a linguistic one and devoted to the creation of a puristic stronghold within the Icelandic speaking community.

The future speakers of hypericelandic won’t necessarily be Icelandic. Every speaker of a Scandinavian language and last but not least every human being on this planet who is interested in Old Scandinavian culture is a potential student of Háfrónska. Geographical dispersion is no obstacle anymore in this era of mass media. It is uncertain whether we will equal the popularity of Nynorsk, but the phenomenon will be noticed.

Although many Icelandic scholars doubt the future success of High Icelandic, their will be a small community of speakers well before the end of this decade. A famous software engineer stated that 99 percent of the Icelanders would be uninterested. If we have to take his words literally, they sound very encouraging. It means that 2750 people would be willing to make the effort to learn Hypericelandic. If you compare this number with those of some endangered linguistic communities, the situation of High Icelandic isn’t that lamentable. We would be a considerable minority. More numerous than the Icelandic Ásatrú.

For now, we are still but a handful of enthusiastic icelanders who are working hard to give shape to our new language. We call upon every compatriot who is interested to join us and to help us in our neologistic endeavours. Search your dictionaries and target every unicelandic word you find. Many times you will be disappointed and unable to find a good native replacement. However, if you don’t succeed at first, try again later. Search the web for information about the term you want to translate. You will find many interesting links on this web-site that will spare you a lot of time. If anyone has original ideas or can provide us with interesting links, please don’t hesitate to inform us. Every neologism will be listed along with the name of the author, if she or he asks for it.

To end up with, we want to thank all those people who have made this possible who morally supported us.
Nýyrðaskáldin

Thulean Imperial Inquisitor
Sunday, September 18th, 2005, 09:22 PM
Hi. He calls himself Timbur-Helgi (carpenter-saint) Hermansson. He is a very interesting person.

http://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=39503&stc=1&d=1127074912

Oskorei
Sunday, September 18th, 2005, 09:57 PM
Nice initiative. I think a similar attempt in Sweden would be futile (the number of loan-words is already too big), but with Icelands unique situation it should hopefully have a greater chance of success.

Nice pictures also. ;)

Weg
Sunday, September 18th, 2005, 10:54 PM
Interesting. But it means they'll have to invent new words to name "things" that your Icelandic forefathers didn't know? Afterall that's the reason why all languages have foreign words in their vocabulary. So will the resurrection of Old Norse vocabulary sufficient?

Thulean Imperial Inquisitor
Monday, September 19th, 2005, 12:16 AM
Interesting. But it means they'll have to invent new words to name "things" that your Icelandic forefathers didn't know? Afterall that's the reason why all languages have foreign words in their vocabulary. So will the resurrection of Old Norse vocabulary sufficient?

You are correct, they have to invent new words to name "things" that my Icelandic forefathers didn't know. That is the way to keep the language pure. That's why those guys call themselves nýyrðaskáld (new word creators). :)

Weg
Monday, September 19th, 2005, 01:06 AM
Should we call you þjóðherji or nýþjóðherji? ;)

Thulean Imperial Inquisitor
Monday, September 19th, 2005, 01:30 AM
Should we call you þjóðherji or nýþjóðherji? ;)

Yeah, sure! It's a good word for a good cause! :thumbup
Blóðverji (blood guardian) is also good.

Fenris
Monday, September 19th, 2005, 02:47 AM
An interesting proposition, and one I support wholeheartedly, it's a shame so many Scandinavian languages are riddled with loan-words from other cultures from outside our geographical region, because pure versions of each would be a grand thing indeed.


Also, on a side note, I approve of the new username and such ;)

Lundi
Monday, September 19th, 2005, 02:49 PM
Interesting. But it means they'll have to invent new words to name "things" that your Icelandic forefathers didn't know? Afterall that's the reason why all languages have foreign words in their vocabulary. So will the resurrection of Old Norse vocabulary sufficient?



We already have a Government branch whose sole duty is to fabricate, new, purely Icelandic words for new inventions etc (in fact we are the only country in the world with such an organisation) Íslensk málstefna is becoming ever more popular and rightly so :)

Weg
Monday, September 19th, 2005, 03:22 PM
We already have a Government branch whose sole duty is to fabricate, new, purely Icelandic words for new inventions etc (in fact we are the only country in the world with such an organisation) Íslensk málstefna is becoming ever more popular and rightly so :)

And yourself, are you learning Íslensk málstefna?

slettusleggja
Tuesday, September 20th, 2005, 07:35 AM
Dear People,

After 15 years of hard work the neologistic skalds of the High Icelandic language movement have succeeded in reducing the amount of loan-words in Icelandic a hundredfold.
The difference in vision between the Icelandic language preservationists and the ultrapurist nÿyrðaskáld is

1) The main reason for the puristic endeavours of the Icelanders is to hold the tread with the old language. But this means that they consider the loan-words (mainly latinisms) in that old language as immune to puristic intervention.

2) The ultrapurists want to eliminate the old loan-words too. In their eyes it is the purism of the last 200 years that has made the language unique. Icelandic is special but not unique in having an old literature. There are other languages in the world that have an old literature. Icelandic isn't special because it has changed the least of all languages in the last millenium. There are a few languages who have resisted change too. So even in this, Icelandic isn't unique.
Icelandic is unique in that it has the world record of puristic excesses. And only in this it differs from every other language on the planet
As a result of this, the purists consider the last two centuries as important as the golden age of Icelandic literature. It is no surprise that the birthday of Jónas Hallgrímsson, a poet of the 19th century has become a holiday.
Purity has become a goal in itself and it is a nobel goal
Holding the tread with the old language is important, but not with its loan-words.

slettusleggja
Wednesday, September 21st, 2005, 01:28 AM
Dear People,

There are many powerful people in Iceland that want to shut us up. The insults at the address of the sympathisants (always from antipurists) of High Icelandic are innumerable. Some scholars of the Íslensk Málstöð like the initiative but must keep their mouth shut because it would be bad for their careers if their publicly admit their ultrapurist sympathies.

Antipurist Icelanders want to send mails to people to remove the link to our web-page until google give no results for háfrónska.

Journalist with antipurist ideas ridiculize our movement in the press.

We need to counteract quickly. And for that reason I must ask you a favour. Can you help us to spread the High Icelandic message? You can do this by asking your friends to put the link to the High Icelandic language centre on their web-page and ask them to tell their friends to do this as well. In this way we can get as many google results for háfrónska than for Icelandic.
But this has to be done swiftly, like a blitzkrieg.
Thulian Imperial inquisitor, Lundi, Fenris, Oskorei, Weg and all the others. Could you help High Icelandic message to on the internet?

Thorvar
Monday, January 16th, 2006, 10:33 PM
Dear People,

My name is Þorvar Grímólfsson, and I'm one of the nýyrðaskáld (neologist poets) of the High Icelandic langauge movement (háfrónska málhreyfingin). High Icelandic is the purest form of a Germanic language and of language in general. We are currently publishing information about this new variant of Icelandic on wikipedia. see:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Icelandic

We need to get the article translated in into Nynorsk, Bokmål and Finnish.
But we need help from Norwegian and Finnish people.

Could anyone of you help us?

Regards,
JEf

Thulean Imperial Inquisitor
Monday, January 16th, 2006, 10:45 PM
Good to see you here sir. I support your interesting project! I am an Icelander and I love my language! ;)

I have aldready started a thread on Háfrónska here at Skadi and at other forums.

http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=38548

I hope you get the help you need! :thumbup

Frans_Jozef
Wednesday, February 15th, 2006, 07:25 AM
The High Icelandic Language movement has its origin in the Icelandic hyperpuristic circles of the nineties.

Although many Icelandic scholars doubt the future success of High Icelandic, their will be a small community of speakers well before the end of this decade. A famous software engineer stated that 99 percent of the Icelanders would be uninterested. If we have to take his words literally, they sound very encouraging. It means that 2750 people would be willing to make the effort to learn Hypericelandic. If you compare this number with those of some endangered linguistic communities, the situation of High Icelandic isn’t that lamentable. We would be a considerable minority. More numerous than the Icelandic Ásatrú.



For now, we are still but a handful of enthusiastic icelanders who are working hard to give shape to our new language. We call upon every compatriot who is interested to join us and to help us in our neologistic endeavours. Search your dictionaries and target every unicelandic word you find. Many times you will be disappointed and unable to find a good native replacement. However, if you don’t succeed at first, try again later. Search the web for information about the term you want to translate. You will find many interesting links on this web-site that will spare you a lot of time. If anyone has original ideas or can provide us with interesting links, please don’t hesitate to inform us. Every neologism will be listed along with the name of the author, if she or he asks for it.




http://d8486.u24.triplus.be/online/

Thulean Imperial Inquisitor
Saturday, March 11th, 2006, 11:40 PM
The High Icelandic language centre has a new website


www.hafronska.org (http://www.hafronska.org)

:thumbup

Theudiskaz
Sunday, March 12th, 2006, 12:26 AM
I've seen this before. Very Interesting project. Linguistic purism is definitely an effective way of bolstering ethnic identity and promoting nationalism. I have been working on a similar but far humbler project with English, attempting to create a purely Anglo-saxon derived vocabulary by reviving dead words and creating new words for technical or political subjects etc. I have done my best to modernize the revived words by observing the phonological shifts that have occured in English since the Norman conquest, with one major exception. I have preserved in many cases the gutteral ch and gh fricatives of Old and Middle English.:)

óðinn
Sunday, May 14th, 2006, 06:46 AM
The High Icelandic project looks nice though cause Swedish sucks because the amount of latin/greek/lowgerman loanwords is so high that one could write a text with the words in SAOL (Svenska Akademiens OrdLista) which would be uncomprehendable to swedes. It is also possible to write full sentences in swedish with by using words of lowsaxon origin. Fortunately those words are comprehendable since swedish and low saxon are relatives.

Icelandic words looks nice though since it is easy to understand them in some cases cause of their describing form.

Háfrónsku má mæla yfir allur á jörðu!:D

But I guess ON (Old Norse) would'nt be wrong either.
At tala á Norrœnu es mjök gaman fyrir hver Norðmaðr.
If there are, or I mean since there is a whole bunch of people here whom has knowlodge in ON/Icelandic I'd like to add that I begun learning four days ago.

Best Regards
óðinn

crymogaian
Sunday, June 25th, 2006, 11:15 PM
The High Icelandic language movement is the furthest you can get with regard to language purism. I found a these new websites about High Icelandic:

http://loanwordterminator.blogspot.com (The blog-site of Timbur-Helgi Hermannsson.)

http://users.telenet.be/Hafronska/fjallbarn (The site about Fjallbarn, the child of the mountains. It tells a lot about High Icelandic symbolism)

http://is.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A1fr%C3%B3nska (The wikipedia article in Icelandic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Icelandic (The wikipedia article in English)

http://www.hafronska.org (The High Icelandic Language centre)

Rollo
Thursday, November 16th, 2006, 11:56 PM
Sounds like an interesting project. I've heard that the Icelandic in the North-West is very conservative.

Linda Trostenhatten
Saturday, June 28th, 2008, 09:31 PM
Ölvun minnkar blóðflæði til heilans

LÆKNISFRÆÐI
Það eru ekki ní
tíðindi að ölvaþ fólk verði óstirkt á
fótum og reikandi í göngulagi. Sú
skjíring sem vísindamenn hava nú
fundiþ á firirbrigðinu er afdur á móti
ní. Það er sem sje ekki eínúngis sú
truflun á jafnvaíjisskjininu sem áfengiþ
orsakar sem þessu veldur. Vísindamenn
hava nebnilega komist aþ því aþ áfengi dregur
ennfremur úr eðlilegri gjetu aíðanna til
að dragast saman.
Það er eínmitt þessi samdraúttur
aíðanna sem aþ ödlu eðlilegu kjemur í
vech firir aþ blóðiþ streími rakleítt
niður í faíturna þegar viþ rísum aú faítur.
En þegar ölvaður maður stendur upp
af barstoúlnum eru aíðarnar orþdnar svo
lamaðar af völdum aúfengisins aþ ehgjert
er því til firirstöðu að bloúðiþ leíti úr
heílanum och niður efdir líkamanum.
Þannich gjerist þaþ tildaímis oft aþ menn
drehga sich undir borðiþ.

þetta er tveggja ára gamalt í dag

Aniketos
Sunday, June 29th, 2008, 01:02 PM
It sounds like a good project every nation should purify it's language, its just a part of national identity. In Russia many Heathens learn Old-Slavic Russian which itself is much cleaner then the modern version.