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View Full Version : Heathen with Christian name - would you change it?



Blutwölfin
Wednesday, September 21st, 2005, 10:56 PM
You're a Heathen, you believe in e.g. the Norse Gods. Or you are an atheist. Or something else. But you're not Christian. Unfortunately your parents named you "Samuel", "Joseph", "Mary" or "Christian". These names, which are Hebrew in origin, are extremely common for European descendants. Would you change your name or would you stick by your name for it was given to you by your parents which should be respected?

Weg
Wednesday, September 21st, 2005, 11:06 PM
I don't need to. Too bad for the others. :P Reminds me of something though... ;)

Blutwölfin
Wednesday, September 21st, 2005, 11:38 PM
I don't need to. Too bad for the others. :P Reminds me of something though... ;)


... but would you if you had a Christian name?

Weg
Thursday, September 22nd, 2005, 12:06 AM
... but would you if you had a Christian name?

Samuel or David? :doh Sure.

Blood_Axis
Thursday, September 22nd, 2005, 01:12 AM
Thankfully, I was given a beautiful name (http://www.loggia.com/myth/danae.html) that is derived from ancient Greek Mythology, of which I am very proud. :)

At the time I was "baptized" a christian name was mandatory alongside a non-christian name in order for you to be baptized, so I was given a christian second name that is only written on my ID and was never used. Most people don't even know it.

I feel very lucky about the choice of name my parents made: non-christian, ancient greek, rare and rather pleasant sounding in the greek language. I am very proud of it.

Should I had been given a Christian name I am not sure what I would have done, mainly for one reason: greek families have a strong tradition of passing on their names every two generations, thus I would have gotten one of my grandmothers' name. And if I was to change it, I would be in a very difficult situation as it would be perceived as disrespect towards my family.

It also depends on the name, of course. If it was a plain, common name like Maria or Helen, I'd probably let it be. If it was something more "extravagant" such as Rebbeca, Sarah or Judith, I'd either change it, or kill myself, or head for summer camp for the recently orphaned children :D :P

Aghis
Thursday, September 22nd, 2005, 01:35 AM
Same here. My name is ancient Spartan and my parents decided upon it with full knowledge and pride which makes me even happier.

If I were bearing a Jewish name, I would have been torn inside to change it about two years ago (at age 20 to 21), which is pretty late - but still.

Ryan Kirk
Thursday, September 22nd, 2005, 01:47 AM
Not an issue for me. Never will be. None of my family have Christian or Jewish names that I know of.

Blood_Axis
Thursday, September 22nd, 2005, 01:48 AM
Same here. My name is ancient Spartan and my parents decided upon it with full knowledge and pride which makes me even happier.
Yes, you have a beautiful and extraordinary ancient greek name as well. The kind to be proud of ;)

PsycholgclMishap
Thursday, September 22nd, 2005, 02:38 AM
My name is about as Christian as it gets: Christina, the feminine form of Christian.

I used to dislike my name as a child but now I have no qualms about it. I was named for my mom (Agatha Christine W.-B.) and both of my grandmas (Sylvia Rose S. and Sarah L. Rose).

My parents were Christian and so they named me as such. My mom Catholic and my dad a Catholic convert (in youth, when my grandma remarried a Catholic). My mom is a practicing Catholic but my dad is not.

More recently, I've often had religious discussions with both them and I am unwavering in my "lack of faith".

My name means nothing if I don't believe in the philosophy of the origins behind it. I am simply Christina, not Christina the annointed or Christina the pure Christian woman.

Different "origin(s)":

CHRISTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: kris-TEEN-a [key]
Extra Info: Popularity, Related Names, Namesakes, Name Days, Websites, Comments
Options: Contribute Information, Add to List
Feminine form of CHRISTIAN. This was the name of a Swedish queen of the 17th century who was interested in the arts and philosophy. She gave up her crown to become a Roman Catholic.


Gender: Female
Origin: Greek
Meaning: Annointed


NAME Christina
ORIGIN English
MEANING Variant of Christiana. Follower of Christ.

Gender: Girl
Pronunciation: kris-TEEN-ah
Origin: Latin
Meaning: "Anointed, Christian."
Notes: Simplified form of Christiana, feminine of Christianus (see Christian), or a Latinized form of Christin (Middle English) "Christian." See also Christabel. Christine and Christiane are French.


Origin
Latin
Meaning
Form of Christopher. Christ-bearer.
Gender
Female


Gender: Female
Origin: Greek
Meaning: annointed, follows Christ

CHRISTINA (English) Anointed one

Christine
Language of origin: Latin
Meaning/translation: Christian woman
Info about origin: See male form Christian
Variants: Christine German, French, English (#101 in US popularity)
Christa German (#447 in US popularity)
Christel German
Christiana German, English (#738 in US popularity)
Christiane German, French
Christina German, English (#36 in US popularity)
Kirsten German, Scandinavian, Low German (#175 in US popularity)
Kirstin German, Scandinavian (#687 in US popularity)
Krista German, Scandinavian (#182 in US popularity)
Tiana German, English (#332 in US popularity)
Christen English (#728 in US popularity)
Christie English (#630 in US popularity)
Christin Scandinavian (#825 in US popularity)
Christy English (#444 in US popularity)
Cristina Italian, Spanish (#208 in US popularity)
Kerstin Scandinavian
Kiersten English, Scandinavian (#526 in US popularity)
Kirstie English, Scottish (#728 in US popularity)
Kristen Scandinavian (#58 in US popularity)
Kristi English (#416 in US popularity)
Kristian English (#830 in US popularity)
Kristie English (#638 in US popularity)
Kristin Scandinavian (#111 in US popularity)
Kristina Scandinavian (#115 in US popularity)
Kristine Scandinavian (#375 in US popularity)
Kristy English (#436 in US popularity)
Kristyn English (#748 in US popularity)
Krysta English (#805 in US popularity)
Tianna English (#555 in US popularity)

After all, all of us are who we make ourselves to be not what others name us.

Weg
Thursday, September 22nd, 2005, 06:30 PM
Christina is OK. It does sound Christian sure, but not typical jewish. Besides it's not of hebrew origin. Catholics are luckier than Protestants I think, at least they don't have to support those typical jewish surnames.

Alizon Device
Thursday, September 22nd, 2005, 07:23 PM
I'm thinking of Joseph Goebbels and Eva Braun etc. who seemed to have no qualms with retaining their Christian names.
I think a few of these names of jewish origin have become so esconsed in the Aryan culture and psyche that they have lost any cultural/ religious meaning they may once have had.

But if I had a name like Nathaniel, Judith, or Isaac, I would change it, I think.

My dad had a thing about Kings of England when it came to naming me and my brother; between the two of us we have the names: Richard, George, Harold, Charles, Edward and Colin. (No, there has been no King Colin, my dad obviously couldn't resist giving his eldest son his own name!)

Having said that, I can see some cases where I would feel compelled to change my name if it was a perfectly respectable, ancient Anglo-Saxon one.

I'm just glad, for instance that my dad wasn't reading a book about King Cnut in the maternity ward. :rolleyes:

Allenson
Friday, September 23rd, 2005, 02:55 PM
Well, as many know, my name is Peter and it has obvious Biblical connotations. Apparently, it's origin is from Greek--Πετρος (Petros) meaning "stone". I'm sure that BA can comment on this. ;)

Anyway, I don't think that I would ever change my name legally and it's not too bad--at least it is of Indo-European origins. As opposed to Aramaic....

alphaknave
Sunday, October 16th, 2005, 03:32 AM
My name being "Adam", which is Hebrew for "man", I plan to change it. Don't know to what yet, or when I'll do it, but I can't have a Jewish name.

Ryan Kirk
Sunday, October 16th, 2005, 03:26 PM
I liked what someone said about the names basically becoming European. When I hear someone talk about a girl named Mary I think of a nice Scottish girl...not a Jewish woman giving birth in a stable somewheres on the other side of the earth.

Cuchullain
Wednesday, November 23rd, 2005, 12:25 PM
I would consider it to be highly disrepectful to my parents to change the name that they had given me, but it is up to each person to decide for themselves.

Slainte

Vanir
Wednesday, November 23rd, 2005, 01:45 PM
I would consider it to be highly disrepectful to my parents to change the name that they had given me, but it is up to each person to decide for themselves.

Slainte
Even if they'd called you Moon Unit? (http://www.nndb.com/people/420/000025345/)

If parents were more educated about their own cultures & heritages, I think there is about as much chance of them giving their children Hebrew names as there is of them giving them Eskimo names, or Japanese names. All equally absurd.

To the question though, perhaps in such a situation when one becomes culturally reawakened, and wishes to be scourged of the Jew name marring them, perhaps they should approach their parents and ask them to "re-name" them, choosing a new name for them of an appropriate origin (ie, Sigurd, Torgils, Hildebrun, etc)

You have then given your parents a chance to correct the unfortunate & misguided choice they made, whilst respecting their new culturally aware choice at the same time, and the "ritual" would also genuinely feel legitimate to the parents & the re-named, rather than them just doing it themselves.

Thankfully I haven't had to worry about that one. My children shan't either, my first daughter is going to be called Freja, and my first son, still not sure, but perhaps either Angus or Britnoth.

Gagnraad
Wednesday, November 23rd, 2005, 09:14 PM
Well, My name is Arnt Christoffer, and when I was born my parents couldn't decide what they should name me... So they decided they would have one name each, my father named me Arnt, after my great-grandfather. And my mother named me Christoffer... And I have since I can remember, hated the Christoffer part of my name. So yes, I will change my name just to Arnt.

freya3
Saturday, November 26th, 2005, 02:00 AM
Being new to Odinism, I have been reading how important it is to honor your ancestors. Is it not a honorable gesture to be named after an ancestor even if they had a christian-based name? I named my daughter after my grandmother, Josephine, and was somewhat distraught to find that it is a Hebrew-based name, but it was something I had always wanted to do.

My name is Teutonic-based- Carla- so I have nothing to worry about ;)

Sifsvina
Saturday, November 26th, 2005, 04:54 AM
If parents were more educated about their own cultures & heritages, I think there is about as much chance of them giving their children Hebrew names as there is of them giving them Eskimo names,

LOL! My original name was an Eskimo word! That's what you get when your parents are hippies living in the Alaskan wilderness with an Eskimo dictionary. I was happy with it for awhile because it was so unique but that was when I thought being unique was a reason for being. My taken name is an ancient Greek goddess name. (Greek gods were the first that fascinated me -exposed through school- but I never thought to worship them:-) It was taken before I was clued into heritage. I would take something more northern in origin and I will if I find one that really suits me but a new name is not something that I'll just take on a whim. I won't be upset if I stay with this one as I am quite happy with it and I have researched that it was not so unique in Victorian England/America. I met someone who said it was an old family name of theirs from England.
Changing names is kind of a tradition in my family so no problem there:-) Despite it being a little hippie my sister hit the jackpot with Willow Rose Lightening! Though except for the Lightening part it wouldn't suit me.
:valkyrie

Ewergrin
Saturday, November 26th, 2005, 04:57 AM
Despite it being a little hippie my sister hit the jackpot with Willow Rose Lightening! Though except for the Lightening part it wouldn't suit me.
:valkyrie
Lightening, or lightning? :)

Sifsvina
Saturday, November 26th, 2005, 05:37 AM
Lightening, or lightning? :)
:doh Well, either is appropriate for me for different reasons (you know my name and hair color) but I meant Lightning! Spell check doesn't work for everything:-)

Sigurd
Saturday, November 26th, 2005, 06:01 AM
Wait...Sifsvina...is the town you are from really called Na Strand? :D

Sifsvina
Saturday, November 26th, 2005, 06:31 AM
Wait...Sifsvina...is the town you are from really called Na Strand? :D

Yup, snakes all around and they are breeding! I must have messed up really bad in my above ground life. San Francisco used to be a much nicer place.
LOL! You guys are cracking me up tonight!

Heidenlord
Saturday, November 26th, 2005, 06:42 AM
Thankfully somehow I got a good Irish name even though I come from the "Bible Belt" and all my immediate and not-so-immediate ancestors were deeply religious; protestants that is. From what I have read my name means roughly "little king". So literaly translated to english my name is something like "little king boot " and I have never heard what my last name means; but it is a good english name.

Sigurd
Saturday, November 26th, 2005, 05:42 PM
Yup, snakes all around and they are breeding! I must have messed up really bad in my above ground life. San Francisco used to be a much nicer place.
LOL! You guys are cracking me up tonight!

Ah, I knew it was used that way. :doh
Best townsname remains "Heidenheim" (heathen home) in Germany. Well, of course there's "Fucking" in Austria, but, well... :D

Weltschmerz
Sunday, November 27th, 2005, 12:47 AM
My name is Henrik, a germanic name that have no christian meaning what so ever. I'll keep it to my grave! :)

Ælfhere
Saturday, March 25th, 2006, 04:42 PM
I'm proud of my family ancestry but both my first and last names are thoroughly Christian.:doh

First Name: Tom


Greek form of the Aramaic name Te'oma which meant "twin". In the New Testament he was the apostle who doubted the resurrected Jesus. According to tradition he was martyred in India.

Last Name:

In Gaelic my last name means: "Son of the Tonsured Servant of God" the progenitor of my Scottish clan being a bishop of Dunkeld.

Alkman
Monday, March 27th, 2006, 11:20 AM
Should I had been given a Christian name I am not sure what I would have done... If it was a plain, common name like Maria or Helen, I'd probably let it be. Haven't you heard of Helen of Sparta before? :P :doh

Sigrid
Monday, March 27th, 2006, 11:56 AM
Mine are mine and not Christian. I am the "winning adviser", lol. My first name is not Hebrew but I prefer my second name which is my mother's first name. A family habit of my Norse family. Surnames are Saxon and Norse.

If I had a Christian first name I would change it as I am a pagan. Africans in South Africa are all getting rid of these Hebrew names and naming themselves and their children from tribal sources. Before that everyone was a Joseph, Ezekiel and Mary. No longer, now they all have native first and second names. And they are changing their dress preferences to reflect ethnic tastes and customs.

klokkwerx
Saturday, April 22nd, 2006, 12:13 AM
Having a X-ian name is like wearing the X-ian yoke!

BSLW
Friday, August 18th, 2006, 03:39 AM
I was given a Christian name Nicholas, but I perfer to go by my middle name Joseph. Those names are pretty Christian so I think it only makes sense to change my name to a non Christian name.


So yes I plan on changing my name to best suit my ancestry and religion.

Gorm the Old
Friday, August 18th, 2006, 04:28 AM
It depends on how strongly one feels about it. "What's in a name ? That which we call a rose, by any other name, would smell as sweet." I was named Martin after a very dear uncle. I know that there was a St. Martin and that, probably, Uncle Martin was named after Martin Luther, but I wasn't named after them. I was named after Martin Olsen and was his favorite nephew.

My middle name was supposed to have been Hendrick, (which ought to have been Henrik). However, the mess which appeared on my birth certificate (Even making allowances for physicians' stereotypically atrocious handwriting, I think the Dr. must have been drunk.) was "Hruncle". I had to have that changed inasmuch as I'd been using Hendrick for 57 years before I applied for Social Security.

Henrik was my grandfather, Ole Henrik, who changed his surname from his father's name + "sen" to the name of the farm where he was born. That's a good Norse name. If I'd been given a biblical name, I might very well have changed it, even though I'm an agnostic, not an Asatruar or an Odinist.

brian
Friday, August 18th, 2006, 05:06 AM
I would not change my name. My parents decided on the names I have, and I will stick with them.

Obviously, you can guess my first by merely looking at my username. Though I don't know of any Celtic blood in my bloodline, the name is good enough. Most Biblical names are overused anyway, for what it is worth.

My middle is Peder. "Peder" comes from my mother's father. Yep, this is a cultural import, probably transmitted through missionaries with their Bibles in hand.

If I were so tempted to change my name, it would be Egil, since my grandfather on my father's side was named that.

Alkman
Saturday, August 19th, 2006, 12:38 PM
I was given a Christian name Nicholas, but I perfer to go by my middle name Joseph. Those names are pretty Christian so I think it only makes sense to change my name to a non Christian name.


So yes I plan on changing my name to best suit my ancestry and religion.
Nicholas is an ancient Greek name, especially common amongst the ancient Spartans. It means "from victorious people".
Joseph is a Hebrew name.

Leofric
Monday, August 21st, 2006, 07:09 AM
Since I'm a Christian with a heathen name and feel no desire whatsoever to change it, I would guess that if I were a heathen with a Christian name, I would also feel no desire to change it.

Either that or it just feels better to have a heathen name than a Christian name, no matter what your religion is. ;)

Bodi_Donarsson
Monday, August 21st, 2006, 08:11 AM
I *am* going to change my legal name to my heathen name, just as soon as life slows down a little bit for me and mine. My reasons are that I was given a name that does not reflect my root culture, and since returning to my ancestral faith, I do not feel any connection to it. For me, its a simple matter, really...my birth/legal name is hebraic in origin, and I am not. I, of course, had no say in the matter, but by the same token, I don't begrudge my parents for it.

My wife and I gave our daughter a good Celtic name, to reflect on her mommy's rich Scots-Irish heritage. When #2 gets here in April, he'll be given a good germanic name, to reflect my heritage. And just to cover all the bases, our dog's name is Bjorn...:fejllkong

We both feel that it is often the little things that help out in the long run, and this is a seemingly small, yet significant way to further cement our return to our Elder Troth.

Wolfsong
Thursday, February 1st, 2007, 12:42 PM
i feel like my name despite having christian ties to be the one my parents gave me so i wouldn't want to change it i might have another name added in between my fore and surnames which reflects my heritage and any heathens could call me if they so wish to but not at the moment it doesn't feel right atm

ladybright
Thursday, February 1st, 2007, 05:10 PM
I was named after a viking so am glad that my parents wanted to remember my mothers heratiage. But they decided not to name me Edith or Olga after my relitives for witch I am grateful. My daughter's middle name is Marie but that is after Marie queen of the sea and my father's sisters all had the middle name Marie.(Anglicans) I can imagine going by a nickname but not changing the name my parents gave me. My brother is Micheal Jonathan but he is named after Micheal Valintine Smith and Johnathan Livingston Seagull from two of my parents favorite books..

Pørdy Mountain
Friday, February 2nd, 2007, 10:14 PM
My name obiviously means something like this:
Servant for the temple; Free-born; noble. It is a feminine form of the latin name Camillus and may possibly be traced back to the young girls who assisted at pagan religious ceremonies
I didn't like the name when I was younger, basically because it sounded boring and because I ALWAYS ended up in a class with two (or more!) other little Cammies.. So much for feeling special :P The fact that both my brothers were given middle-names, and that I was stuck with only one, didn't exactly help either.

Today, I really don't mind. I have never put much thought into the real "meaning" behind the name, and would probably not have changed it only because I suddenly found out that it was a Christian name.

Kith of woden
Friday, March 2nd, 2007, 01:42 PM
I dont want to sit on the "fence" here but would use both. Hopefully i will be professed into Odins holy nation sometime in the near future, and would like to take on a heathen name of my choice. I would however only use that name when moving or conversing in heathen circles. When im with my parents who are supposed to be christians then i would use my name given to me at birth, as not to offend them.

Thusnelda
Monday, July 16th, 2007, 07:25 PM
Besides the fact that it is nearly impossible to switch the prename, I think I would try to change it only if my hypothetical name would be really extreme - "Sharon" for example. :doh

I´m totally okay with my prename "Julia", its not even Christian (it´s a Roman name...from the gender of Julians), but I think that some Christian names sound quite good, anyway. I find "Anna" or "Theresia" quite beautiful names.