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View Full Version : World War I in Color



Theobald
Friday, August 12th, 2005, 01:05 AM
These pictures are either original French archives which have been digitally colourised or Tournassoud colour photos (only the French used colour photography during WW1 but it was very expensive, hence the high quality photos).

http://tinypic.com/a4vqjd.jpg

http://tinypic.com/a4wf0j.jpg

http://tinypic.com/a4wf93.jpg

http://tinypic.com/a4vrb4.jpg

http://tinypic.com/a4vrkw.jpg

http://tinypic.com/a4vsxf.jpg

http://tinypic.com/a4vt4x.jpg

http://tinypic.com/a4vtcm.jpg

Theobald
Friday, August 12th, 2005, 01:06 AM
http://tinypic.com/a4vtic.jpg

http://tinypic.com/a4vtll.jpg

http://tinypic.com/a4vtsm.jpg

http://tinypic.com/a4vu45.jpg

http://tinypic.com/acwneu.jpg

http://tinypic.com/acwnm0.jpg

http://tinypic.com/acwnrs.jpg

Theobald
Friday, August 12th, 2005, 01:11 AM
Also interesting pics there : http://www.greatwar.nl/frames/default-color2.html

A French line in Belgium :

http://tinypic.com/a4wsar.jpg

A French hospital camp on the banks of the river Yser :

http://tinypic.com/a4wsn4.jpg

Prayer on a wall in France ( ;) ) :

http://tinypic.com/a4wt1h.jpg

A battlefield in Northern France :

http://tinypic.com/a4wt4j.jpg

http://tinypic.com/a4wtc8.jpg

http://tinypic.com/a4wtiq.jpg

http://tinypic.com/acwqiw.jpg

No Man's land seen from a French observation post :

http://tinypic.com/acwqcm.jpg

Gorm the Old
Friday, August 12th, 2005, 01:34 AM
These do not look like original color photographs to me. If I could see the originals, I could tell immediately. The French invented practical color photography with the patenting of the Autochrome process in 1907. However, Autochrome produced only transparencies, not prints. If the originals are prints, they were not photographed in color but were probably "colorized" by hand tinting, a very popular technique which was applied both to transparencies and to prints. This much cheaper way of producing color pictures continued to be employed by some companies, such as Keystone in Media, PA, as late as 1956. If the original photographs are on glass plates, examination with a high-power magnifier (at least 10 X) will reveal the image to be made up of red-orange, green, and indigo dots of somewhat irregular shape and random arrangement. Though Autochrome plates are rather dark, the colors are usually much more vivid than those in these photographs.