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dst18
Sunday, April 18th, 2004, 09:45 PM
Green eyes are a sign for which race?
Perhaps a sign for mixing races?

greetings

cosmocreator
Sunday, April 18th, 2004, 09:55 PM
Melanin is yellow. So when there is only a small amount of pigment in the eyes, on blue eyes, the result is green. yellow + blue = green

Angelcynn Beorn
Monday, April 19th, 2004, 04:34 PM
I dont understand. You seem to be saying blue eyes are the default colour when non-pigmented, and that small additions of melanin (yellow) produce green eyes. If this is the case then how do certain animals, and a tiny minority of humans, have yellow eyes?

dst18
Monday, April 19th, 2004, 04:40 PM
Melanin is yellow. So when there is only a small amount of pigment in the eyes, on blue eyes, the result is green. yellow + blue = green
Are pigments sign of race mixing?
So can one pigment make a blue eye eg. brown?

johnnywalker
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 02:16 AM
Green eyes are a sign for which race?
Perhaps a sign for mixing races?

greetingsI suppose you have blue eyes? :D
I have seen people from my country (India) with light blue eyes..

Heck..my granddad has blue-grey eyes..

Awar
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 02:58 AM
I have grey-blue eyes........what sort of pigment is grey??

rusalka
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 03:01 AM
I have grey-blue eyes........what sort of pigment is grey??
I have doubts about that too, although gray actually looks lighter than most blue eyes, blue eyes seem to be the less pigmented. Then what is gray? Obviously not a mixture of blue and yellow, which gives out the green result. A lot of people in my family have gray or gray-blue, gray-green eyes, I'm curious too.

ScotchTape
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 04:05 AM
My eyes used to be blue but now they switch from grey to blue.
Green eyes can be found in MiddleEastern/South Asian countries quite easily if you count hazel as green. I think they are a sign of racemixing because I often see mullattos with green eyes.

Dr. Solar Wolff
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 04:31 AM
My observation is that green eyes are associated with UP types and with people from western Britian, Iberia, Ireland, Norway. But that is an unscientific observation.

Wolves and many other carnivors have yellow eyes as do some people. Perhaps yellow eyes, Coon mentions "beer eye", was the first color change from brown as Europe was populated.

NormanBlood
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 04:48 AM
Green eyes are a sign for which race?
Perhaps a sign for mixing races?

greetings

umm...no :P A white person with very dark brown to black eyes would be a sign of race mixing. There is nothing wrong or "mixed" about a greeneyed person ;)

Timo
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 05:09 AM
Green eyes are a sign for which race?
Perhaps a sign for mixing races?
Green eyes isn't a sign of any race.
No, it is diffinately not the sign of mixing races.


Here is my eye. There is a ring of brown in the center, blue on the outside and green on the inside. In my family there are blue, green and brown eyes, yet blue is the most prevailant. I seemed to have not inherited it though.

NormanBlood
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 05:19 AM
Such as mine?

lol..your eye doesn't look dark brown :P I meant as in almost black..making the pupil hard to distinguish..etc. ;)

Timo
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 05:27 AM
like hers?

http://www.tccandler.com/audrey_tautou_hs.jpg

Ewergrin
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 05:43 AM
Probably a good example of grey-green eyes:

NormanBlood
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 05:50 AM
Timo, yup :P

Esther_Helena
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 06:20 AM
I heard somewhere that eyes (irises) are basically composed of 2 layers. If one layers is pigmented you have blue eyes, if both are pigmented, you have brown. Green eyes were blue with the melanin covering. Maybe it was a bit more complicated than that, but that's all I remember. Both my parents have green eyes. My mom might have brown. I'll have to ask.

I don't know if it's visible in this pic, but mine are light brown around the pupil, and dark green ring around the edge of the iris. The middle portion, has some light brown "fibers" going through it. Depending on lighting, they can go from a light green to a mucky brown.

My eyes (sorry if the images are huge):

Graeme
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 01:43 PM
The iris is composed of three layers. The innermost layer in Europeans contains melanin. Melanin is not really yellow, it is brown and when thinly scattered in the innermost layer produces the optical illusion of blue eyes in the same way that dust in the upper atmosphere scatters sunlight and reflects blue light, so the sky looks blue. Green eyes are due to more melanin granules present in the inner most layer, blue is still reflected out, but the presence of more brownish melanin gives the appearance of green eyes. With more melanin, the brown effects become obvious giving light brown, hazel, chestnut to black eye colours. In European races the second layer does not contain melanin, in mongoloid and negrids, melanin may be present in that layer. The outer iris layer is more or less atrophied. The more atrophied the layer the greyer the eye.

Melanin is protective against UV penetration to sensitive tissues. The eye can be damaged by excessive light and it is not surprising that people, Europeans included, tend to be brown eyed in bright, sunny climates.

Frankly as far as my aesthetics are concerned I think green eyes are unattractive. Reptilian like. My fathers eyes are blue-green. It may have something to do with my dislike to greenish eyes.

Milesian
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 02:03 PM
Everyone knows that green eyes are a sign of good breeding :D

My eyes sound similar to yours, Timo.
Basically green, but tending to blue on the outer iris (which shows best in strong sunlight), and tending to a light brown near the pupil.
In dim lighting, my eyes can seem brown, but direct sunlight will show them to be in fact, quite lightly coloured. Overall in normal light, green would be the colour most likely to be seen

Seems to be a mix between my father's blue eyes and my mother's green/light brown eyes.

rusalka
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 02:46 PM
Everyone knows that green eyes are a sign of good breeding :D
:highfive :)


My eyes sound similar to yours, Timo.
Basically green, but tending to blue on the outer iris (which shows best in strong sunlight), and tending to a light brown near the pupil.
In dim lighting, my eyes can seem brown, but direct sunlight will show them to be in fact, quite lightly coloured. Overall in normal light, green would be the colour most likely to be seen
Sounds rather similar to mine, my eyes change appereance with light and also with what I wear and the weather. They can appear more bluish, more grayish or greenish but basically they're green.


Seems to be a mix between my father's blue eyes and my mother's green/light brown eyes. I think I've got my father's eyes more or less directly, his are a gray-green very similar to mine whereas my mom has hazel eyes. As a child I had often wished I had inherited my grandfather's eyes though, they were pure gray and he had blue spots on his eyes and I thought it looked so unique (which they did, of course). Ah well, we all know green eyes rule. :P

I'm attaching two photos taken in different lighting conditions to show the difference. In the first one I'm wearing black mascara so that might have made a difference in the color too.

Milesian
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 04:23 PM
rusalka! You eyes in that first pic look stunning! I'm impressed!
You and I should get together and compare eye colour sometime..... :naughty

Your 2nd pic looks quite like mine from this thread, which of course doesn't do them justice ;) - http://www.forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=7125&page=2&pp=31

Green Power! :D

rusalka
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 04:41 PM
rusalka! You eyes in that first pic look stunning! I'm impressed!
You and I should get together and compare eye colour sometime..... :naughty

Aww, thank you. :fcurtsy:


Your 2nd pic looks quite like mine from this thread, which of course doesn't do them justice ;) - http://www.forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=7125&page=2&pp=31

Green Power! :D
Whoa! You shouldn't have showed me that photo! Have pity on this girl, you have adorable eyes you Gael. Living up to the name of Emerald Isle, aren't you? ;)

Green Power!

Timo
Saturday, April 24th, 2004, 03:30 AM
Yes, Rusalka has beautiful emerald eyes.

Taras Bulba
Saturday, April 24th, 2004, 03:35 AM
Yes, Rusalka has beautiful emerald eyes.

Indeed she does. Yet that doesnt suprise me, since many of the most beautiful women I've met had green eyes. :D

Dr. Solar Wolff
Saturday, April 24th, 2004, 06:27 AM
The iris is composed of three layers. The innermost layer in Europeans contains melanin. Melanin is not really yellow, it is brown and when thinly scattered in the innermost layer produces the optical illusion of blue eyes in the same way that dust in the upper atmosphere scatters sunlight and reflects blue light, so the sky looks blue. Green eyes are due to more melanin granules present in the inner most layer, blue is still reflected out, but the presence of more brownish melanin gives the appearance of green eyes. With more melanin, the brown effects become obvious giving light brown, hazel, chestnut to black eye colours. In European races the second layer does not contain melanin, in mongoloid and negrids, melanin may be present in that layer. The outer iris layer is more or less atrophied. The more atrophied the layer the greyer the eye.

Melanin is protective against UV penetration to sensitive tissues. The eye can be damaged by excessive light and it is not surprising that people, Europeans included, tend to be brown eyed in bright, sunny climates.

Frankly as far as my aesthetics are concerned I think green eyes are unattractive. Reptilian like. My fathers eyes are blue-green. It may have something to do with my dislike to greenish eyes.

What about grey eyes?

Vestmannr
Saturday, April 24th, 2004, 07:01 AM
I was given to understand that grey eyes had melanin largely only in the back layers of the iris. I'd like confirmation of that as well, as I have grey eyes: though my mother was green eyed, and my father brown eyed. His father had ice blue eyes, and his mother brown ... and my mother's parents had blue eyes both. My wife has light blue eyes, like sky blue ... and her parents also had green eyes and brown eyes. Accordingly, I would have expected us both to have green eyes: or our children. However, our children so far have only light blue or light grey eyes. I have yet to see a clear explanation for the presence of green eyes from a mixture, or grey/blue eyes in spite of a mixture. Otherwise, I had always assumed that grey eyes were only common with Slavs, and amongst some Celts.

Awar
Saturday, April 24th, 2004, 02:55 PM
As someone said long ago on this forum, grey eyes are the eyes of a warrior :P

Graeme
Monday, April 26th, 2004, 06:27 PM
Grey eyes are the same as blue eyes except for one thing feature. The iris has three layers and the outermost layer is usually atrophied. In grey eyes the iris has the full thickness of this outermost layer. So, an atrophied outer layer gives blue eyes, intact outer layer gives grey eyes. The difference is physiological and due to the structure of the iris and not the amount of melanin in the innermost layer. Grey eyes are a feature of the Finnic peoples hence by mixing of Slavic speakers and East Baltics. Blue eyes are more common among Scandinavians, Anglo-Saxons and Irish.

As for warriors I would have expected dark icy blue.

Awar
Monday, April 26th, 2004, 08:19 PM
Yay, I have Finnic blood :)

So, since my eyes are dark-blue with grey areas, what ancestry could that suggest?

Taras Bulba
Monday, April 26th, 2004, 09:04 PM
Nay, I'm proud and content with my brown eyes! :D :P

Vestmannr
Tuesday, May 4th, 2004, 04:03 AM
Somehow I doubt the Grey eyes amongst us Celts is 'Finnic'. If so, there would be genetic markers. The construction of the iris noted must also be a characteristic amongst some of us Atlantic peoples: I've met Galicians, Asturians, Irish, Scots, Welsh, English, and northern French with grey eyes.

Euclides
Tuesday, May 11th, 2004, 11:17 PM
Green eyes are a sign for which race?
Perhaps a sign for mixing races?

greetings


The genetics of eye color are complicated. Eye color is polygenic. It is determined by multiple genes. The eye color genes include EYCL1 (a green/blue eye color gene located on chromosome 19), EYCL2 (a brown eye color gene) and EYCL3 (a brown/blue eye color gene located on chromosome 15). There are clearly other genes that influence eye color. The once-held view that blue eye color is a simple recessive trait has been shown to be wrong. The genetics of eye color are so complex that almost any parent-child combination of eye colors can occur.

Graeme
Wednesday, May 19th, 2004, 02:59 PM
It is nigh on impossible for two blue eyed parents to have a brown eyed child, a mixed eye colour maybe, green or yellowish spots excepted. Grey eyes are not Finnic; it was Coon who linked grey eyes with East Baltics, Finns etc. In reality blue and grey are basically the same and have little to do with ethnic groups across Europe. Also females tend to have more brown eyed or hazel eyed individuals than blue or grey eyed. Dominance in eye colour is not complete, there are many cases of blue eyed individuals one of whose parents was not caucasoid and had black irises.

bocian
Wednesday, May 19th, 2004, 03:50 PM
A little off topic...Below are two sets of eyes, mine (guess which :D ) are obviously blue and I only posted them for comparison.

The other set is also blueish but definitely different from mine, My question is; What exact colour is it? They don't really appear grey, or green.

The pics are cropped from one source, sorry for the quality, hopefully the colours show up as intended.

rusalka
Wednesday, May 19th, 2004, 04:14 PM
The other set is also blueish but definitely different from mine, My question is; What exact colour is it? They don't really appear grey, or green.

I don't know what exact color that is but my grandmother has the almost same color of eyes and I've always thought of it as a greenish blue with gray. I'm not sure if there is a specific name for that color but it definitely looks gorgeous. :)

bocian
Wednesday, May 19th, 2004, 04:25 PM
I don't know what exact color that is but my grandmother has the almost same color of eyes and I've always thought of it as a greenish blue with gray. I'm not sure if there is a specific name for that color but it definitely looks gorgeous. :)

Thanks, Rusalka.

That's what I was thinking, a blue/grey/green mix.

As far as I know, it's not very common.

People have actually stopped us on the street, and even in supermarkets to inquire about them.

rusalka
Wednesday, May 19th, 2004, 04:32 PM
Thanks, Rusalka.

That's what I was thinking, a blue/grey/green mix.

As far as I know, it's not very common.

People have actually stopped us on the street, and even in supermarkets to inquire about them.
Oh, it's certainly not very common and my grandmother still gets curious looks from people. When she was young she was the talk of the neighborhood, my grandfather used to say, because it really is a rare color. I take it that the owner of the gorgeous pair of eyes is your wife? Congratulations. :)

I would imagine that that specific color would not have one single name because it's not common enough. Yours, however, are very clearly blue with no visible gray or green mixture.

bocian
Wednesday, May 19th, 2004, 04:41 PM
I take it that the owner of the gorgeous pair of eyes is your wife? Congratulations. :)



Correct, and Thank you very much. I must admit, the eyes did it for me, right from the start. :)

TisaAnne
Wednesday, May 19th, 2004, 07:19 PM
I have always wondered about green eyes as well...probably because I have them. But, I don't think that there is a specific ethnic reference for green eyes, since so many different people from different ethnic backrounds have them. What I am really curious about is mixed-coloring in the iris. My eyes change frequently from light green, to blue, to a mix of green/blue with yellow flecks...Why does this happen? My father has blue eyes and my mother green, but it is not always the case that the child will come out with both.

Odin Biggles
Wednesday, May 19th, 2004, 07:23 PM
http://www.zippyimages.com/files/54060/EYES_FRONT.jpg
http://www.zippyimages.com/files/54061/EYES_FRONT_SHINY.jpg

What do you think of my eyes ? ;) (if ive inserted them properly)

Under different lighting during the daytime

TisaAnne
Wednesday, May 19th, 2004, 07:30 PM
http://www.zippyimages.com/files/54025/EYES_FRONT.jpg http://www.zippyimages.com/files/54030/EYES_FRONT_SHINY.jpg

What do you think of my eyes ? ;) (if ive inserted them properly)

Under different lighting during the daytime
The page loads up blank :(

Odin Biggles
Wednesday, May 19th, 2004, 08:05 PM
Fixed it hopefully :frog

rusalka
Wednesday, May 19th, 2004, 08:13 PM
Fixed it hopefully :frog
There's a problem with the webpage, one has to copy the address and then open a new explorer window and paste it there. So I saved the image for you and I'm attaching it here. I hope it works now. :)

As for the color, I think yours is closer to gray-blue than green, but does have a greenish area right in the middle.

Odin Biggles
Wednesday, May 19th, 2004, 08:42 PM
Thanks for that i have another here that ive attached :)

bocian
Wednesday, May 19th, 2004, 09:33 PM
I have always wondered about green eyes as well...probably because I have them. But, I don't think that there is a specific ethnic reference for green eyes, since so many different people from different ethnic backrounds have them. What I am really curious about is mixed-coloring in the iris. My eyes change frequently from light green, to blue, to a mix of green/blue with yellow flecks...Why does this happen? My father has blue eyes and my mother green, but it is not always the case that the child will come out with both.

No doubt, you're eyes are quite stunning.

I'm sure you've heard that before. :)

Odin Biggles
Saturday, May 29th, 2004, 02:14 AM
Ive added a pic of my eyes early one morning, why im wearing a coat on a sunny morning i dont know.

British Caution ;)

Bill Noble
Tuesday, January 4th, 2005, 07:37 AM
Sorry to bump an old thread, but this is a topic that interests me.
My observation is that green eyes are associated with UP types and with people from western Britian, Iberia, Ireland, Norway. But that is an unscientific observation.My own impression was that green eyes were a predominantly Irish trait. However, a fellow I was chatting with in Edmonton claims that green eyes in the Irish are rare, occuring in less than one percent of the population; he additionally claimed that green eyes were more likely to occur among the Polish. And I have encountered a few Poles with green eyes, so I guess that is possible.

Dr. Solar Wolff mentions UP types, and I have to say that my own gut feelings point towards Brünn specifically. But, gut feelings make for poor science... so I'm hoping someone here has better information than I.

Hagalaz
Tuesday, January 4th, 2005, 08:15 AM
http://tinypic.com/161glh

http://tinypic.com/161glt

Here are two different pics of my eye. Would you consider them green?

The Horned God
Tuesday, January 4th, 2005, 12:12 PM
Green eyes are slightly pigmented eyes, slightly more pigment and they would be hazel slightly less and they would be blue none at all and they would be pure light blue.
In very low consentrations the brown pigment melanin looks yellow, the underlying color of the iris is blue, and what does Blue+Yellow make?
Green of course!

http://www.yorku.ca/eye/colormx3.htm

Rhydderch
Tuesday, January 4th, 2005, 12:50 PM
My own impression was that green eyes were a predominantly Irish trait. However, a fellow I was chatting with in Edmonton claims that green eyes in the Irish are rare, occuring in less than one percent of the population
Green eyes are quite common among the Irish, although I think I remember that blue eyes are predominant.

Oskorei
Wednesday, January 5th, 2005, 09:31 PM
http://tinypic.com/161glh

http://tinypic.com/161glt

Here are two different pics of my eye. Would you consider them green?
The light is weird in both pictures, but in the latter, it looks yellowish. And judging from The Horned Gods post about Yellow+Blue=Green, that would make them Green methinks. Weird light though.

Hagalaz
Wednesday, January 5th, 2005, 10:22 PM
The second picture I used a digital camera with flash. The first I just took with my webcam.

Milesian
Friday, January 7th, 2005, 10:55 AM
Green eyes are slightly pigmented eyes, slightly more pigment and they would be hazel slightly less and they would be blue none at all and they would be pure light blue.


No pigment at all and they would be pink as seen on Albinos, due to the blood vessels showing through without being masked by the pigment.

Actually there are two layers which can be pigmented in the eye.
If only the innermost layer is pigmented then the result is blue.
If the innermost is pigmented with also a small amount of the outer layer, the result is green.
If both are pigmented, the result is brown.

All eye colours are a result of the degree of pigmentation between these two layers

Milesian
Friday, January 7th, 2005, 10:57 AM
Green eyes are quite common among the Irish, although I think I remember that blue eyes are predominant.

According to some anthropologists, Ireland has the highest ration of light eyes, with blue predominant.

Green eyes are very common in Ireland

Rhydderch
Friday, January 7th, 2005, 01:26 PM
Green eyes are very common in Ireland
An interesting thing I've noticed is that Irish (or at least their descendants here in Australia, and British for that matter) with light eyes and olive skin usually seem to have green rather than blue eyes.

Milesian
Friday, January 7th, 2005, 01:46 PM
An interesting thing I've noticed is that Irish (or at least their descendants here in Australia, and British for that matter) with light eyes and olive skin usually seem to have green rather than blue eyes.


To be honest, olive skin isn't common in Ireland.
Even those with dark hair and eyes tend to be pale skinned.
Perhaps there is just more chance of a tan in Australia :)

The Horned God
Friday, January 7th, 2005, 02:12 PM
No pigment at all and they would be pink as seen on Albinos, due to the blood vessels showing through without being masked by the pigment.No pigment or very little, in either layer and the eyes are blue, no 'pigment-layer-cells' at all, and the eyes are pink as in Albinos.

When these cells are empty of pigment their semi translucent cell walls reflect blue light. Albinism is the only case where these layer cells themselves are not present.

Milesian
Friday, January 7th, 2005, 02:18 PM
No pigment or very little, in either layer and the eyes are blue, no 'pigment-layer-cells' at all, and the eyes are pink as in Albinos.

When these cells are empty of pigment their semi translucent cell walls reflect blue light. And those cells are only missing in albinos.



"The exact color of the human eye is determined by the amount of a single
pigment called melanin that is present in the iris of the eye. Melanin is a
dark brown pigment that is deposited on the front surface of the iris. If a
lot of melanin is present, the eye will appear brown or even black. If very
little melanin is present the iris appears blue. Intermediate amounts of
melanin produces gray, green, hazel or varying shades of brown. Genes work
by directing the production of enzymes, chemicals that control all of the
processes that occur in our body. Eye color genes, through the enzymes they
produce, direct the amount and placement of melanin in the iris. Newborn
babies all have blue eyes because at the time of birth they haven't begun to
produce melanin in their irises. A baby's eyes may change to green, brown or
other colors as melanin production begins. Albinos have no pigment in their
irises so the blood vessels in the back of the eye reflect light making the
eyes look pink. Albinos also lack melanin in their skin and hair. Since
albinism is caused by a recessive allele, two normal parents may produce an
albino. An albino can have normal offspring if the other parent is normal
for melanin production."


http://www.seps.org/oracle/oracle.archive/Life_Science.Anatomy/2002.12/001040227218.11496.html

Odin Biggles
Friday, January 7th, 2005, 02:20 PM
Milesian, through the pictures in this thread (which are still up i hope :D) which colour would you class my eyes ?.

Milesian
Friday, January 7th, 2005, 02:21 PM
Regardless, I'm not an expert on eye pigmentation, so if you are adamant then I will stand corrected

Milesian
Friday, January 7th, 2005, 02:22 PM
Milesian, through the pictures in this thread (which are still up i hope :D) which colour would you class my eyes ?.


I'll take a look tonight, as I can't see pics from my office computer.
Damn viruses :)

Odin Biggles
Friday, January 7th, 2005, 02:26 PM
Ok then :D.

The Horned God
Friday, January 7th, 2005, 03:05 PM
Regardless, I'm not an expert on eye pigmentation, so if you are adamant then I will stand corrected
No damit, it looks like you're right, and I am guilty of hubris, (not for the first time)the closest thing I can find to supporting my halfbaked theory is this;

http://www.wonderquest.com/eye-color.htm


A: The colored part of the eye (the iris) regulates the amount of light that the pupil lets in the eye. That’s its job. Its color is a different story.
If the iris contains much brown pigment, then the iris reflects brown light just like a brown shirt and appears brown. However, if the front layer of iris cells (the stroma) contains little or no brown pigment, the tiny loosely-organized stroma cells interact with blue light much more than with red and lower-frequency light. The interaction causes the blue light to re-radiate and scatter out the eye. An observer sees the out-going blue light and perceives a blue iris.

Blue eyes, however, differ from red eyes in that they don’t lack all brown pigment. They have normal pigment in the back layer of iris cells (the iris pigment epithelium [IPE]). Indeed, eyes of all colors have about the same amount of pigment in the IPE, except an albino’s red eyes.

Blue eyes are blue for the same reason that the sky is blue. The stroma cells function much like air molecules and tiny motes of dust in the atmosphere. These particles are all small enough that the short-frequency light waves (i.e., violet and blue) are three times more likely to interact and scatter than red light.
I was incorrect to assume that blue eyes contain no melanin. They contain normal levels in the back layer.
And I was also incorrect to say that Albinos do not posess the iris pigment epithelium [IPE] cells, it seems they do.
Lets just put this ugly matter behind us and move on will we?. :blush

Rhydderch
Saturday, January 8th, 2005, 12:05 PM
To be honest, olive skin isn't common in Ireland.It's "fair" to say that the Irish (including their descendants here) are in general a relatively pale skinned group, but there is nevertheless an (not negligible) olive skinned minority; but as you indicate, they are more likely to be noticed in Australia.
I suppose it's conceivable that a disproportionately large number who came out here were from regions which have a higher percentage of olive skinned people.

Overall though, the western British (particularly Devon/Cornwall, western Scottish Highlands and in and around Wales) probably have a higher percentage of olive skinned than most of Ireland.


Perhaps there is just more chance of a tan in Australia :)That's true, but there are certainly many who don't tan well.

Esther_Helena
Saturday, January 8th, 2005, 04:15 PM
Sorry to bump an old thread, but this is a topic that interests me.My own impression was that green eyes were a predominantly Irish trait. However, a fellow I was chatting with in Edmonton claims that green eyes in the Irish are rare, occuring in less than one percent of the population; he additionally claimed that green eyes were more likely to occur among the Polish. And I have encountered a few Poles with green eyes, so I guess that is possible.

Dr. Solar Wolff mentions UP types, and I have to say that my own gut feelings point towards Brünn specifically. But, gut feelings make for poor science... so I'm hoping someone here has better information than I.
I'll have to look into that. I'm Irish on my dad's side, and German on my mom's. They both have green eyes. Different shades mind you, but I'd call them green. Mine are green as well, well a bluish green. I wish I knew where the color came from. Well besides genes.

Vitor
Wednesday, February 2nd, 2005, 03:18 AM
Graeme was right here...


The iris is composed of three layers. The innermost layer in Europeans contains melanin. Melanin is not really yellow, it is brown and when thinly scattered in the innermost layer produces the optical illusion of blue eyes in the same way that dust in the upper atmosphere scatters sunlight and reflects blue light, so the sky looks blue. Green eyes are due to more melanin granules present in the inner most layer, blue is still reflected out, but the presence of more brownish melanin gives the appearance of green eyes. With more melanin, the brown effects become obvious giving light brown, hazel, chestnut to black eye colours. In European races the second layer does not contain melanin, in mongoloid and negrids, melanin may be present in that layer. The outer iris layer is more or less atrophied. The more atrophied the layer the greyer the eye.

Melanin is protective against UV penetration to sensitive tissues. The eye can be damaged by excessive light and it is not surprising that people, Europeans included, tend to be brown eyed in bright, sunny climates.

Frankly as far as my aesthetics are concerned I think green eyes are unattractive. Reptilian like. My fathers eyes are blue-green. It may have something to do with my dislike to greenish eyes.

I do not agree with the last sentence though...
:D
I have green/brown eyes. Hazel might be the word.

SouthernBoy
Wednesday, February 2nd, 2005, 04:46 AM
My mother's eyes are light-green, and my fathers are dark-blue. Unusually, my eyes turned out to be a very light shade of blue.

Odin Biggles
Wednesday, February 2nd, 2005, 12:33 PM
My mum has the lightest blue eyes you could find, my dad however has a sort of bluey-greeny mix much like mine.

My sisters both have light blue eyes just like my mums.

cruhmann
Wednesday, February 2nd, 2005, 11:45 PM
Unfortunately, many racial experts, incuding Coon, speak of light eyes and blue and grey eyes, but rarely if ever of green eyes. I knew a lady (of British ancestry) that had what appeared to be very light pure green eyes. However, it seems that most people with green eyes have darker shades. I've observed it among Poles, too. Less so among Germans, although it is not totally absent. Maybe in the east it is from an eastern Cro-Magnid-like or other UP type.
I believe there are in Europe today descendants of racial types that are overlooked in classifications because they are either very mixed, or so sporadic that no significant numbers occur in any one locality, or both. Maybe green eyes came from one or more of these types. There is a correlation in Britain between green eyes and red hair, even if it is absent or irrelevant in Ireland.

Lidvick
Thursday, February 3rd, 2005, 12:08 AM
Hmm I am of German stock for my Grandfather came from the area of the black forest region. I have blonde hair and green eyes.

I hate to disapoint you but my computer sucks completely windows 95 and it simply does not have the capability of digital photography I wish I did have such things for I would of posted my pictures a long time ago.

I might be able to talk to a friend with a computer to get a photo of me on their computer , I am not certain if that would work.:thumbup

cruhmann
Thursday, February 3rd, 2005, 12:33 AM
Yeah, I was speaking generally about Germans. My father has 100% German ancestry, and I have seen probably 50+ of his relatives, and only a very few had greenish eyes, and none have pure green. I have seen more with Alpinish greenish-brown eyes. On his father's side, some have mostly blue with a few greenish, yellow and brown flecks, as opposed to more pure blue and greyish-blue on his mother's side.

Huzar
Monday, February 7th, 2005, 01:52 AM
In my family, from paternal lineage, there is a little tendency to light or mixed eyes ; my grandfather had grey eyes (and the same all his four brothers), while my father has light brown- greenish eyes (this shows very well like green is an intermediate shade to grey and blue). I have the same color of my father, but changes considerably with light. Although, i think that color is light brown : what do you think ?


http://img3.imagevenue.com/loc231/a9c_99999999999999.JPG

Kräuterhexe
Monday, February 7th, 2005, 02:10 AM
I think you can call it green.

Odin Biggles
Monday, February 7th, 2005, 02:19 AM
They look hazel to me...

Aistulf
Monday, February 7th, 2005, 02:40 AM
Green eyes isn't a sign of any race.
No, it is diffinately not the sign of mixing races.
I agree.



Here is my eye. There is a ring of brown in the center, blue on the outside and green on the inside. In my family there are blue, green and brown eyes, yet blue is the most prevailant. I seemed to have not inherited it though.
That might change in later generations, the world of genetics can be so unpredictable...

By the way, I have a similair color eyes. When I was younger, my eyes were gray-blue'ish and later they changed greenish and eventually hazel (light brown/greenish) inner ring surrounded by a dark green-grey outer ring - which all occured in a relatively short time. (My hair, though, was still very light blonde when I was sixteen or so).

Hagalaz
Monday, February 7th, 2005, 05:20 AM
Here we go: I'd go with grey-green. What do you think?
http://tinypic.com/1o2khy

Dr. Solar Wolff
Monday, February 7th, 2005, 06:53 AM
Eye color is not simple inheritance as are blood types. Eye color is polygenetic, meaning there are many genes involved. Each gene has varients, alleles, so that the inheritance of eye color is so complicated that, to date, nobody has been able to figure out the math. So, if you have genes or a gene or an allele for brown eyes and a gene for blue or grey eyes, you could end up with green eyes---but then again, there are people with very light eyes which are not blue or grey. Sometimes these eyes are green. Sometimes these eyes are sort of a beer-color. Sometimes even light brown eyes can have yellow highlights like wolf-eyes.

Huzar
Monday, February 7th, 2005, 01:56 PM
They look hazel to me...
Maybe. Sometimes, i'm uncertain.

(many people, i believe, have a not precisely identifiable color).

Huzar
Monday, February 7th, 2005, 02:35 PM
Here we go: I'd go with grey-green. What do you think?
http://tinypic.com/1o2khy
I think more grey than green. Your colour is a bit too light; you're inthe perfect middle of the chromatic line between blue and grey.

Huzar
Tuesday, February 8th, 2005, 10:04 AM
Eye color is not simple inheritance as are blood types. Eye color is polygenetic, meaning there are many genes involved. Each gene has varients, alleles, so that the inheritance of eye color is so complicated that, to date, nobody has been able to figure out the math. So, if you have genes or a gene or an allele for brown eyes and a gene for blue or grey eyes, you could end up with green eyes---but then again, there are people with very light eyes which are not blue or grey. Sometimes these eyes are green. Sometimes these eyes are sort of a beer-color. Sometimes even light brown eyes can have yellow highlights like wolf-eyes.
could we think my eyes to be a sort of co-dominance between brown and green, then ?