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Mac Seafraidh
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 06:33 AM
/noticias.info/ Eight European countries have been meeting in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria, since yesterday at the initiative of the World Bank and the George Soros Foundation, to commit to eliminating the discrimination against the Roma population, Libération (France) reports. They are launching the “2005-2015 Decade of Roma integration.”

The Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia, which are members of the European Union, and Bulgaria and Romania that are EU candidates, as well as Croatia, Macedonia, and Serbia-Montenegro, which wish to join the EU, are to sign a common declaration today in which they “commit to work towards the elimination of the discrimination and of the unacceptable gap that separate Roma from the rest of society.”

The World Bank, which has been assisting ex-USSR countries in their transition from communism to free market, has noted a steady degradation of the living standards of Roma and has, along with the Soros Foundation, fixed four priorities for the Roma Decade projects: education, employment, housing, and health. Since 2003, the eight countries involved in the project have elaborated detailed action plans. Today, they will adopt these plans and sign the declaration that will concretize their engagement. They are being supported by the European Commission, the UNDP and the OSCE.

The World Bank created a Roma education fund last December. The fund received $43 million for its first year, $30 million of which have been provided by the Soros Foundation. It will have to raise hundreds of millions of dollars to reach its goals over the decade, a Bank expert says. The largest part of the Decade project budget will be the responsibility of the participating countries, and will comprise national funds, external aid, including through EU programs, the Soros Foundation and the World Bank.

Tages Anzeiger (Switzerland) reports that the idea of the Roma Decade was born in Budapest in 2003 during a conference of the Soros Foundation and the World Bank. At the time, participants agreed that the social exclusion of such a large minority could only be remedied by cross-national efforts.

Süddeutsche Zeitung (Germany) adds that about eigth million Roma are living in Europe, six million of which are believed to be in Eastern countries. According to the World Bank, almost 40 percent of Roma in Eastern Europe live on less than 1.65 euros a day. In Bulgaria, 89 percent of the children are making it only to primary school, and unemployment in Roma communities is often close to 100 percent. There is a vicious cycle. Families are too poor to buy clothes and books for their children. The latter are then segregated at school, don’t receive a degree, work, or money. Hence, many of the support programs are targeting the education sector.

The Financial Times meanwhile explains that public works schemes in Slovakia have given Roma - many of whom have not worked since the compulsory employment of the Communist era - some of the basic disciplines needed to hold down a job. But the schemes have given Roma few worthwhile skills, nor have they opened up any real employment possibilities in a region of high unemployment and endemic racism. In Trebisov, where there is 18 percent unemployment, just three Roma - all work scheme coordinators - have gone on to secure manual jobs as rubbish collectors and security guards.

Agence France Presse further explains that gypsies in Central and Eastern Europe are a young and growing minority in the midst of ageing national populations. In Slovakia, the gypsy, or Roma, population has grown from four percent of the population at the time of the fall of communism in 1989 to a full seven percent of the in 2004, according to data from the Slovakian center for demographic research. The gypsy minority is young but life expectancy is lower than in the general population -- three years less in Slovakia and seven years less in Romania. Slovakian population expert Boris Vano said gypsies isolated in villages also have higher birth rates than the general population which along with their shorter life expectancies indicate a profile similar to that for people in poor, developing countries. But when the gypsies are integrated into society their birth rates and life expectancies fall into line with the general population.

The International Herald Tribune also notes that rights groups involved with [Roma initiatives] warn that governments will have to overcome centuries of discrimination against the Roma. According to Dimitrina Petrova, Director of the European Roma Rights Center in Budapest, this may take more than setting official targets. Citing the example of Hungary, where local authorities refused financial incentives to help desegregate classrooms, she said some officials would only accept change if it was enforced by law. Other than broad anti-discriminatory laws that already exist in most of the eight participating states, such legislation does not appear to be up for discussion on Wednesday.

The Irish Times finally relates the words of James Wolfensohn, president of the World Bank who says that "the Decade offers an opportunity to turn the tide of history and harness the political will to include the Roma as full citizens in European societies.” Under the Decade initiative the governments will make a range of commitments to their Roma populace, from building new houses to integrating them with the wider community to employing gypsy teaching assistants to stop Roma youngsters being shoved into special-needs schools. Supporters of the Decade of Roma Inclusion want it extended into Western Europe and east into Ukraine and Russia.

Le Temps (Switzerland) and The Australian also report on the launch of the Decade of Roma Inclusion.

http://www.noticias.info/asp/aspComunicados.asp?nid=47031&src=0

Gypsies are walking STD's and George Soros is a Jewish swine and I hope the next election his choices or democratic party loses. Then we can all laugh at how much money he blows to help the Dems win. Soros is a nobody in all seriousness. He has cash that he can boss people with and infiltrate the ZOG media some more.

Triglav
Saturday, February 5th, 2005, 04:06 PM
/noticias.info/ Eight European countries have been meeting in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria, since yesterday at the initiative of the World Bank and the George Soros Foundation, to commit to eliminating the discrimination against the Roma population, Libération (France) reports. They are launching the “2005-2015 Decade of Roma integration.”

The Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia, which are members of the European Union, and Bulgaria and Romania that are EU candidates, as well as Croatia, Macedonia, and Serbia-Montenegro, which wish to join the EU, are to sign a common declaration today in which they “commit to work towards the elimination of the discrimination and of the unacceptable gap that separate Roma from the rest of society.”

The World Bank, which has been assisting ex-USSR countries in their transition from communism to free market, has noted a steady degradation of the living standards of Roma and has, along with the Soros Foundation, fixed four priorities for the Roma Decade projects: education, employment, housing, and health. Since 2003, the eight countries involved in the project have elaborated detailed action plans. Today, they will adopt these plans and sign the declaration that will concretize their engagement. They are being supported by the European Commission, the UNDP and the OSCE.

The World Bank created a Roma education fund last December. The fund received $43 million for its first year, $30 million of which have been provided by the Soros Foundation. It will have to raise hundreds of millions of dollars to reach its goals over the decade, a Bank expert says. The largest part of the Decade project budget will be the responsibility of the participating countries, and will comprise national funds, external aid, including through EU programs, the Soros Foundation and the World Bank.

Tages Anzeiger (Switzerland) reports that the idea of the Roma Decade was born in Budapest in 2003 during a conference of the Soros Foundation and the World Bank. At the time, participants agreed that the social exclusion of such a large minority could only be remedied by cross-national efforts.

Süddeutsche Zeitung (Germany) adds that about eigth million Roma are living in Europe, six million of which are believed to be in Eastern countries. According to the World Bank, almost 40 percent of Roma in Eastern Europe live on less than 1.65 euros a day. In Bulgaria, 89 percent of the children are making it only to primary school, and unemployment in Roma communities is often close to 100 percent. There is a vicious cycle. Families are too poor to buy clothes and books for their children. The latter are then segregated at school, don’t receive a degree, work, or money. Hence, many of the support programs are targeting the education sector.

The Financial Times meanwhile explains that public works schemes in Slovakia have given Roma - many of whom have not worked since the compulsory employment of the Communist era - some of the basic disciplines needed to hold down a job. But the schemes have given Roma few worthwhile skills, nor have they opened up any real employment possibilities in a region of high unemployment and endemic racism. In Trebisov, where there is 18 percent unemployment, just three Roma - all work scheme coordinators - have gone on to secure manual jobs as rubbish collectors and security guards.

Agence France Presse further explains that gypsies in Central and Eastern Europe are a young and growing minority in the midst of ageing national populations. In Slovakia, the gypsy, or Roma, population has grown from four percent of the population at the time of the fall of communism in 1989 to a full seven percent of the in 2004, according to data from the Slovakian center for demographic research. The gypsy minority is young but life expectancy is lower than in the general population -- three years less in Slovakia and seven years less in Romania. Slovakian population expert Boris Vano said gypsies isolated in villages also have higher birth rates than the general population which along with their shorter life expectancies indicate a profile similar to that for people in poor, developing countries. But when the gypsies are integrated into society their birth rates and life expectancies fall into line with the general population.

The International Herald Tribune also notes that rights groups involved with [Roma initiatives] warn that governments will have to overcome centuries of discrimination against the Roma. According to Dimitrina Petrova, Director of the European Roma Rights Center in Budapest, this may take more than setting official targets. Citing the example of Hungary, where local authorities refused financial incentives to help desegregate classrooms, she said some officials would only accept change if it was enforced by law. Other than broad anti-discriminatory laws that already exist in most of the eight participating states, such legislation does not appear to be up for discussion on Wednesday.

The Irish Times finally relates the words of James Wolfensohn, president of the World Bank who says that "the Decade offers an opportunity to turn the tide of history and harness the political will to include the Roma as full citizens in European societies.” Under the Decade initiative the governments will make a range of commitments to their Roma populace, from building new houses to integrating them with the wider community to employing gypsy teaching assistants to stop Roma youngsters being shoved into special-needs schools. Supporters of the Decade of Roma Inclusion want it extended into Western Europe and east into Ukraine and Russia.

Le Temps (Switzerland) and The Australian also report on the launch of the Decade of Roma Inclusion.

http://www.noticias.info/asp/aspComunicados.asp?nid=47031&src=0

Gypsies are walking STD's and George Soros is a Jewish swine and I hope the next election his choices or democratic party loses. Then we can all laugh at how much money he blows to help the Dems win. Soros is a nobody in all seriousness. He has cash that he can boss people with and infiltrate the ZOG media some more.
Another (mixed-race) Gypsy family has moved to my village. In a matter of a few years, my village, once free of Gypsies, will be swamped with them and will become a cesspool of crime, drugs and social benefit fraud just like every other village that underwent this process. :( The elderly population is dying out, there are few youths, and the only thriving population are Gypsies (mostly social welfare freeloaders) who move to abandoned houses and live on child benefits, their children becoming welfare bums again, spawning more offspring that will never work, which kind of defeats the purpose, but is still preferable to integration. Mixed-race couples such as the aforementioned are extremely rare (fortunately).

Ewergrin
Saturday, February 5th, 2005, 06:51 PM
Another (mixed-race) Gypsy family has moved to my village. In a matter of a few years, my village, once free of Gypsies, will be swamped with them and will become a cesspool of crime, drugs and social benefit fraud just like every other village that underwent this process. :( The elderly population is dying out, there are few youths, and the only thriving population are Gypsies (mostly social welfare freeloaders) who move to abandoned houses and live on child benefits, their children becoming welfare bums again, spawning more offspring that will never work, which kind of defeats the purpose, but is still preferable to integration. Mixed-race couples such as the aforementioned are extremely rare (fortunately).

Sounds to me like you need to find every single European female in your village and start multiplying fast! Triglav saves the village!

Triglav
Saturday, February 5th, 2005, 07:42 PM
There aren't that many... just a handful. ;)

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