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Mistress Klaus
Thursday, November 4th, 2004, 06:11 PM
If you were completely self-sufficient with cattle, sheep and chickens, could you actually kill your stock when required to eat meat?

Anne14
Thursday, November 4th, 2004, 10:02 PM
There's no way I could raise it from a baby and not be totally attached and in love with it.

PsycholgclMishap
Thursday, November 4th, 2004, 10:15 PM
Cattle are exactly that, Cattle. If you were a farmer you would understand that and have no qualms about it.

Ewergrin
Thursday, November 4th, 2004, 10:21 PM
Absolutely. As a man who has shot, killed, cleaned and cooked his own game, I could do it with ease. The key is not pretending they are pets before dinner time. ;)

When I was a young lad, my parents raised horses (not for eating, of course) and poultry. They grew their own vegetables, too. It was during this time that they aquired a young female hog. This hog they had for months, and got quite large. My mother made the mistake of befriending this hog as her pet and companion during her yard and garden work. Well, the time came and this hog had to be slaughtered. She made my father take it somewhere and have it slaughtered, and when he returned with the meat, she refused to eat it and she cried for the rest of the night!

Moral lesson? They're food, not pets!

Anne14
Friday, November 5th, 2004, 04:13 AM
Cattle are exactly that, Cattle. If you were a farmer you would understand that and have no qualms about it.

Well, I guess it's a damn good thing I'm not a farmer then huh?

WarMaiden
Friday, November 5th, 2004, 05:09 AM
Cattle are exactly that, Cattle. If you were a farmer you would understand that and have no qualms about it.

Not a Farmer either!!

WarMaiden
Friday, November 5th, 2004, 05:10 AM
If you were completely self-sufficient with cattle, sheep and chickens, could you actually kill your stock when required to eat meat?


My Husband used to hunt a lot and enjoyed it, with no time and being far away from the property he hunted from all our junk is store bought, i'm not a huge meat fan to be honest and could defintely live without it!!!

Allenson
Friday, November 5th, 2004, 03:22 PM
Sure I could do it. I've helped some friends before with their seasonal Deer and cleaned many-fish that I've caught.

It's not my favorite thing in the world but if it needs to be done, then so be it.

Triglav
Friday, November 5th, 2004, 05:50 PM
Could do it, have done it. Someone has to. :o

Telperion
Saturday, November 6th, 2004, 03:35 AM
I could do it, but would prefer not to do it myself as long as someone else is available to do it for me. It's a messy, smelly and unpleasant task.

Mac Seafraidh
Saturday, November 6th, 2004, 08:52 AM
No, I am Pisco-Vegetarian. I picked I could not face it, but I guess I could scale a fish.

Nefertari
Tuesday, November 23rd, 2004, 08:31 PM
If I were raising cattle, I suppose I could do it, otherwise I wouldn't be raising them in the first place.

However, if it were simply a matter of doing it for food and I weren't raising them, I'd have to be mighty hungry, ie; starving, before I could get the nads to do it. :P

Mjölnir
Friday, April 15th, 2005, 12:01 PM
Yes of course.

I've done it may first time as my Army Survival Training. And if you know what it happens when you have hunger about 3 days or more you slaughter like a butcher. Trust me. :-D

M., :D

Mistress Klaus
Friday, April 15th, 2005, 12:18 PM
Yes of course.

I've done it may first time as my Army Survival Training. And if you know what it happens when you have hunger about 3 days or more you slaughter like a butcher. Trust me. :-D

M., :D
What in your opinion, would be the most humane way of killing?...(Cut throat, suffocation or bullet?)

Mjölnir
Friday, April 15th, 2005, 12:28 PM
What in your opinion, would be the most humane way of killing?...(Cut throat, suffocation or bullet?)

Hmm ist difficult.. When it is a chicken i ll be for breaking the neck.
If its is a bigger pet like a pig or something else i prefer a bullet right between the eyes. Its a fast uncomplicated death and the best for the pet.

And you meaning..?

W./M., :)

Blood_Axis
Friday, April 15th, 2005, 12:40 PM
Hmm ist difficult.. When it is a chicken i ll be for breaking the neck.
If its is a bigger pet like a pig or something else i prefer a bullet right between the eyes. Its a fast uncomplicated death and the best for the pet.

And you meaning..?

W./M., :):( You cruel human being! :D :P

Mjölnir
Friday, April 15th, 2005, 01:08 PM
:( You cruel human being!

No no no im not cruel i am "modern" and i have three pets:

One Schäferhund/Rottweiler Mischling
and 2 cats. One white the other grey with green eyes.

Now... you see i am a 100% nice guy :comfort


W., :sombrero

Blood_Axis
Friday, April 15th, 2005, 01:14 PM
Now... you see i am a 100% nice guy :comfort

Now, I know you are, I was just kidding! ;)

Mjölnir
Friday, April 15th, 2005, 01:19 PM
ah well i like kidding... :haha

And whats your meaning to that Thread?

Could you slaughter your own meat! Or shall i do this for you.. :naughty

W.,:)

Mistress Klaus
Friday, April 15th, 2005, 02:14 PM
ah well i like kidding... :haha

And whats your meaning to that Thread?

Could you slaughter your own meat! Or shall i do this for you.. :naughty

W.,:)
I initially started this thread because I was interested in,...since alot of us like eating meat,..to whether we would be up to 'actually' killing the meat we eat. (Considering this modern world of spoilt desires).
Can anybody of today truly call or think themselves as a 'heathen'...yet buy their meat at the supermarket..?:haha ...Not criticising...I was pondering my own belief's.

Ewergrin
Friday, April 15th, 2005, 02:47 PM
What in your opinion, would be the most humane way of killing?...(Cut throat, suffocation or bullet?)


Humane way of killing? That's odd, coming from someone who hates humans. ;)
I suppose the most humane way of killing it would be to kidnap it, rape it for three days in a basement, on videotape, punch it repeatedly in the head until it has brain damage, then sever it's limbs and let it bleed to death on the floor.

Now, the easy, mostly painless, preferred way of killing an animal (large animal) for consumption would have to be a large caliber round to the head. Even if it doesn't finish it off the first time, the second one round will.

Scáthach
Friday, April 15th, 2005, 03:22 PM
No..but i could let my other half do it and then cook it myself.

Mistress Klaus
Friday, April 15th, 2005, 04:12 PM
Humane way of killing? That's odd, coming from someone who hates humans. ;)
I suppose the most humane way of killing it would be to kidnap it, rape it for three days in a basement, on videotape, punch it repeatedly in the head until it has brain damage, then sever it's limbs and let it bleed to death on the floor.

Now, the easy, mostly painless, preferred way of killing an animal (large animal) for consumption would have to be a large caliber round to the head. Even if it doesn't finish it off the first time, the second one round will.
Yes...I should have never used that 'humane' word.:doh

Ewergrin
Friday, April 15th, 2005, 04:14 PM
Yes...I should have never used that 'humane' word.:doh

But we love you anyways. ;)

Sigel
Friday, April 15th, 2005, 04:17 PM
Could you slaughter your own meat?
I'd try not to :rrofl :rofl

Vanir
Friday, April 15th, 2005, 04:56 PM
I personally don't eat meat, I haven't eaten red meat in about 15 years (that's just me though).

I'll eat Fish though, if I catch it myself. I used to do a LOT of fishing/spear-fishing, and I figure that since I've put myself out of my natural element completely, I've given the Ocean every chance of taking me, I'm going to take lives, so I'll put mine up for grabs.

If put into a situation regularly where you have to kill, trust me, you'd become desensitized to it faster than you think.

Odin Biggles
Friday, April 15th, 2005, 06:58 PM
Maybe an animal I didnt know that much, certainly not animals/livestock Id had for ages and looked after as the bond woud be too great :(.

Sifsvina
Wednesday, April 20th, 2005, 09:13 AM
I have done it. Not often as I currently live in a city. :help There is a deep joy in directly participating in the cycle of nature - particularly when hunting. For me it is a quiet place I go to when doing what must be done, what is "right". It is like sheading a grey layer of false programming. There is an honor in it.
The actual butchering is pretty gross:-p But must be done, sigh. Learning to properly butcher larger animals correctly is on my to do list. I don't know how I would feel about an animal I had raised for awhile. My mother, who is a small farmer, manages so I'm sure I will. Someday...:valkyrie

"this is necessary, life feeds on life feeds on life......"

Allenson
Wednesday, April 20th, 2005, 05:52 PM
Maybe an animal I didnt know that much, certainly not animals/livestock Id had for ages and looked after as the bond woud be too great :(.

Indeed! There are people we know around here who raise pigs, beef cows and other livestock. They name the animals, treat them as near-pets and then come slaughtering season--crack! goes the rifle. They've no problem with it.

I've never raised an animal that was destined for my belly (though I did work on a dairy farm where old milkers were eventually sold to the hamburger plant ;)) and I've wondered how I would handle such a thing. I'm sure I could do it--but it would not be without some emotional difficulty, I speculate.

Ewergrin
Friday, April 22nd, 2005, 06:31 AM
Indeed! There are people we know around here who raise pigs, beef cows and other livestock. They name the animals, treat them as near-pets and then come slaughtering season--crack! goes the rifle. They've no problem with it.

I've never raised an animal that was destined for my belly (though I did work on a dairy farm where old milkers were eventually sold to the hamburger plant ;)) and I've wondered how I would handle such a thing. I'm sure I could do it--but it would not be without some emotional difficulty, I speculate.


I was under the impression that dairy cattle were never used for that? The females give milk until they can no more, and the males are born to be hamburger?

Allenson
Friday, April 22nd, 2005, 02:11 PM
The females give milk until they can no more...

That's right and when they can give milk no more, it's off to McDonald's for them! At least on the farm that I woked on....

Ewergrin
Friday, April 22nd, 2005, 02:48 PM
Have you had Bison?

Allenson
Friday, April 22nd, 2005, 02:56 PM
Have you had Bison?

Not the wild stuff no--but I have had a few Beefalo steaks before. Rather good, really.

May I suggest the Moose? ;) We found droppings in our woods just yesterday....

http://www.ausbonsargent.org/news/wildSightings/wildImages/moose.JPG

Ewergrin
Friday, April 22nd, 2005, 02:59 PM
Not the wild stuff no--but I have had a few Beefalo steaks before. Rather good, really.

May I suggest the Moose? ;) We found droppings in our woods just yesterday....

http://www.ausbonsargent.org/news/wildSightings/wildImages/moose.JPG

A teacher of mine, who was very much into his AmerIndian ancestry, once told me that Buffalo was a far superior meat to cattle. Do you find this to be true?

Allenson
Friday, April 22nd, 2005, 03:15 PM
I'm not sure of the nutritional superiority (though I suspect it is better) but I does indeed taste very good (and better than ranch cattle). I had some in Wyoming many years ago and then once again a couple years ago from a farm in New Hampshire.

Sifsvina
Friday, April 22nd, 2005, 08:17 PM
Carabou is the best (if memory serves me right from childhood) and blueberry bear even better! :valkyrie

Ewergrin
Friday, April 22nd, 2005, 08:41 PM
Carabou is the best (if memory serves me right from childhood) and blueberry bear even better! :valkyrie

Blueberry bear? I can honestly say that the mere thought of eating bear sickens me.

Sifsvina
Wednesday, April 27th, 2005, 05:39 AM
Blueberry bear? I can honestly say that the mere thought of eating bear sickens me.
Why?
When it is blueberry season they eat only blueberries and their meat is marbled with blueberry flavored fat. It's as if it were marinated in berries. Other times in the year they can taste kinda raunchy as they are often carion eaters. :valkyrie

green nationalist
Wednesday, April 27th, 2005, 01:02 PM
I used to hunt when I was a young teenager as well, we would shoot rabbit and duck. However I dont see the need to eat meat now that their is a variety and enough vegetables available ( we are not dependent on the seasons for our veg) , but if I was in a life death situation I would kill my own game,

I guess if I raised a Animal for slaughter i probably wouldent be able to it, i would become to attached, But I wouldent raise a animal for that purpoe in the first place so its a moot point.

Scáthach
Wednesday, April 27th, 2005, 11:35 PM
Oh Mr Vegan, I'll never understand you.

Scáthach
Wednesday, April 27th, 2005, 11:37 PM
Have you had Bison?

No, but it's something I really want to try. Help me out and send some over with the dog? ;)

green nationalist
Thursday, April 28th, 2005, 10:57 AM
Oh Mr Vegan, I'll never understand you.

Im a deep and complex person :-D

NatRev
Tuesday, October 24th, 2006, 07:19 PM
Easy question for me.

I don't eat meat anyway. :D

Gagnraad
Monday, February 26th, 2007, 04:18 AM
Yup, done it myself.

I have seen many kids who don't know where meat or food in general come from,
they believe all is produced in the store :( Where are this world going?...

ladybright
Monday, February 26th, 2007, 05:05 AM
I have never slaughtered an animal but think I could. I would rather have a friend who knows what they are doing do the butchering though. My three year old knows that our roast beef comes from cows but has never seen pictures of a slaughterhouse.

And I love bison and beefalo(hibred) as well as venison and rabbit.

freya3
Monday, February 26th, 2007, 05:30 PM
Yes, I could. Especially now that I have kids, I have an instinct now that would make me do anything for them and their well-being, even if it meant to kill "moo-cow" :doh

Northerner
Monday, February 26th, 2007, 09:29 PM
I grew up on a farm in a very rural portion of southeastern Indiana. There were numerous times when either by myself or helping someone else that I slaughtered animals for food and then processed/cured the meat. These farm animals included cattle, pigs, and chickens. We also hunted squirrels, rabbit, duck, and quail. Believe it or not, I've eaten groundhog, which makes a good, though somewhat slightly greasy, stew with potatoes and carrots.:D

Gorm the Old
Tuesday, February 27th, 2007, 12:15 AM
I don't know how, but, if it were necessary, I could learn to. I've made steak-and-kidney pie, Ever cut up a kidney ? MESSY.

We humans have the teeth of omnivores. They are unspecialised and, therefore, equally ill-suited for vegetation and meat. Mankind ate meat, whenever they could get it, for at least several tens of thousands of years before anyone tried to live on an exclusively vegetable diet.

Those who have tried to do so, such as some canyon-dwelling tribes of Native Americans who had been driven out of their hunting grounds, did not flourish. (There's an old joke: "Vegetarian" : old Native American word for "bad hunter".)

On moral grounds, related to the cruelty of slaughtering as it's usually practised, and to the conditions under which some meat aniumals, such as calves for veal, are raised, I would prefer to be a vegetarian, or at least a vegan.

I actually tried to adopt a vegetarian diet in the 70's. I did not flourish either. I had no energy and felt weak. I suspect that my body had become so accustomed to meat after about 40 years on a carnivorous diet, that it could not adapt to the change.

I wonder how long it took the early Hindus to adapt to a vegetarian diet after having been meat-eaters in Vedic times ? I'm sure it didn't take place overnight. Even today, I have found that formerly devout Hindus who have adopted a meat diet ("When in Rome do as the Romans do.") are loth to give it up.

I don't eat veal because I've seen the way those poor critters are treated and I won't support such cruelty. Please don't tell me similar horror stories about other meat animals. I don't want to starve.

BTW, I have eaten bison, venison, moose, and bear. The latter two are strictly a stunt. Moose is very gamey and bear tastes like liver and is as tough as well-tanned shoe-sole leather. Bison and venison are both great eating.

Sifsvina
Tuesday, February 27th, 2007, 01:10 AM
The wild meats vary so much. You obviously didn't have bear from the blueberry season!

So, I want to straighten something out. The actual modern method of killing animals in the first world is very humane. They have all sorts of shoots and gizmo's to make it stress free and quick for the animal. I'm sure there are exceptions and there is always the occasional accident but my ex worked in a slaughter house for awhile and it's very quick and the beeves never know what's coming. He said the "knocker" (the person who wields the "gun" that does the killing) very very rarely ever missed and if they did he was ostracized. The rules are actually quite strict.


It's all the other parts of their lives, health, and diet that I have objections to!

Grimsteinr
Thursday, March 1st, 2007, 02:07 PM
I grew up on a farm in a very rural portion of southeastern Indiana. There were numerous times when either by myself or helping someone else that I slaughtered animals for food and then processed/cured the meat. These farm animals included cattle, pigs, and chickens. We also hunted squirrels, rabbit, duck, and quail. Believe it or not, I've eaten groundhog, which makes a good, though somewhat slightly greasy, stew with potatoes and carrots.:D

Actually, I Did. And, I grew up on a farm, having much the Same Experiences you did, In Franklin Co. IN. I presently live in SW Indiana., on a small farm.

I've slaughtered, and helped with slaughtering, many Critters also. We raised rabbits, for slaughter, too, a few. I've helped as well with slaughtering Lambs.
Yumm, I love roasted Lamb.
We had cattle, chickens, pigs, & ducks, a few sheep and a few rabbits.
We had a neighbor who was a "Coon hunter". I ate racoon at his home a few times. I've killed many young groundhogs, for the "table".
I was an avid hunter growing up.
Now, mostly too old , fat & lazy, Hunnh.

But, when the rubber meets the Road, I am NOT going hungry.
Most of us will do "what needs to be Done".
Self Survival is Strong, in the end, for Most, regardless of
high-minded ideals.
Live Deliberately!

Gorm the Old
Friday, March 2nd, 2007, 03:36 AM
You're probably right, Sifsvina. I don't know when the blueberry season is in the Rocky Mountains. I know that it's midsummer in Maine. Besides, who knows how old that bear was ? All I know is that it was the least enjoyable of the wild game meats I've eaten.

Kith of woden
Friday, March 2nd, 2007, 01:20 PM
I have done so in the Army where i did find it unpleasant, but i think if you were self sufficient youd have to do it. If you couldnt kill an animal then you wouldnt be self sufficient very long. Therefore i think that if you were particulary squemish then i wouldnt even consider becoming self sufficient. Our Ancestors would probably laugh at us for even asking the question as they had to kill. I dont think they would have thought twice. Maybe after the initial shock people would become acustomed to it and would stop treating the annimals as pets, to save thier own heartache. I wouldnt have any problems i just would nt enjoy it.

Ulf
Sunday, July 15th, 2007, 09:32 PM
I've killed and butchered a troublesome chicken my friend had.

We promptly 'shake and baked' it, and had a delicious meal.

Kith of woden
Sunday, July 15th, 2007, 09:41 PM
What did the chicken do that was that troublesome that it warranted the "shake and bake" treatment?

Ulf
Sunday, July 15th, 2007, 09:43 PM
It was messing with the other chickens and had killed one chicken. Also it was messing with the only turkey, aka 'Turkey Lurkey' and that can't be tolerated.

The chickens killed off all the turkeys except for Turkey Lurkey, he is now 3 times the size of all the chickens and rules the roost! :D

Kith of woden
Sunday, July 15th, 2007, 09:46 PM
Hail The Turkey! Kill the chickens!

SmokyGod
Monday, July 16th, 2007, 05:47 AM
Why?
When it is blueberry season they eat only blueberries and their meat is marbled with blueberry flavored fat. It's as if it were marinated in berries. Other times in the year they can taste kinda raunchy as they are often carion eaters. :valkyrie

i always wanted to take an Alaskan grizz right after Salmon season...and spend salmon season fishing!

God i need to get out to Alaska.

Ravensblood
Tuesday, January 1st, 2008, 06:26 PM
Lets see I have been around the slaughter of Animals my whole life, we raise animals for meat,eggs what have you as well, we hunt so yeah I'm OK and can slaughter my own meat.. I think if more people had the chance to see where food comes from they would 1) have a deeper respect for farmers, 2) they would see how beautiful life is and respect it more...

I just hate the hunter's who hunt for the sake of shooting an animal for fun and the antlers and then cut the head off and leave the carcass lying to rot :( those folks...ARG!

Hersir
Friday, January 4th, 2008, 12:20 AM
Yes, to provide for myself and for my family.

Brynhild
Sunday, January 6th, 2008, 02:46 AM
I'd be hopeless on a farm, having grown up with all the mod cons and my attachment to animals. :D

Having said that though, if it ever came down to meeting the needs of my family and I, then yes I would.

Papa Koos
Monday, January 14th, 2008, 04:23 AM
I grew up in a hunting/fishing culture. Seems we were always doing one or the other. The animals we killed were eaten. Trophy gathering was scorned.

As I've gotten older and life more precious I'm not the least bit interested in killing animals, so I neither hunt nor fish now. BUT, if my family needed protean I'd do it in an eyeblink.

Pørdy Mountain
Monday, January 14th, 2008, 12:22 PM
I used to spend a lot of time at my grandparent's farm when I was younger, and got to see some of these slaughterings.. They tried to keep us from watching, but we managed to see most of it from a proper distance anyways. At that time, I didn't mind.. On a farm these things were natural, and we they made good food for us to eat. I sometimes did feel sorry for the pigs, but again, food. My uncle does a lot of hunting and fishing, and I have been lucky enough to hunt and fish with him. Great experience really, wouldn't want to be without it.

Today however, with much cleaner and prettier nails, I don't think I'd slaughter my own meat. If I were invited to a hunt, I'd definitely say yes though. Only thing I don't like, is skinning the animals.. I'd rather do the cooking and eating part :P

Edenkoben
Tuesday, January 15th, 2008, 10:23 PM
A teacher of mine, who was very much into his AmerIndian ancestry, once told me that Buffalo was a far superior meat to cattle. Do you find this to be true?

There are several Bison farms here in Wisconsin. The meat is better for several reasons: First, they are rarely (never?) given growth hormones or antibiotics. Second, the meat is quite lean (some say "dry"). Third, most allow them to free-range, so they're eating as and what they are best adapted to eat.

As for killing a bison, since the adults are as tall at the shoulder as a human, I'm pretty sure that a bullet is the way to kill them. Butchering is a heluvan effort due to the sheer size of the animal.

I could slaughter. Butchering is fairly easy go, though physical labor. It's the gutting/skinning that I find most unpleasant...maybe too close a reminder of how noxious we mammals can be!

Both slaughtering and butchering do, I think, cause one to remember that you took a life to enhance/maintain your own. I think this is better than simply cooking a cut of meat from the grocery store; once it's all packaged prettily it's easy to forget that it once was a creature. I'm not arguing for vegetarianism, but pointing out that a respect for all life is wise.

Galloglaich
Thursday, January 31st, 2008, 01:01 AM
I too was raised in a hunting/fishing culture. My grandparents had a farm. I have killed and cleaned a lot of game, as well as been present and participated in livestock slaughterings. This may sound strange, but I'd rather it be that way. Not because I enjoy the violence or the gore, but out of respect for the animal. If you're going to eat meat you should have an idea of what the process entails and have the guts to face up to it. One should always strive for a quick clean kill and minimize any suffering. I've shown respect for every animal I've killed and I'm not a fan of trophy hunting.

Weißmann
Monday, June 30th, 2008, 10:27 PM
What a great Question!

ADOLF HITLER asked the same question himself.

I couldn´t do it.

Blood_Axis
Tuesday, July 1st, 2008, 10:32 AM
What a great Question!

ADOLF HITLER asked the same question himself.

I couldn´t do it.
Me neither...I am incapable of slaughtering anything (except my noisy neighbours of course, that I would gladly do ;))

Gagnraad
Tuesday, July 1st, 2008, 01:02 PM
I think everyone could do it, it's all about getting used to blood and the screams of the animal being slaughtered.

Imagine the third world war. Entire populations are dead and you must survive in the devastated urban jungle. You find a deer, and somehow you managed to lure it in your trap. Then comes the slaughter... What would you do to survive?

Blood_Axis
Tuesday, July 1st, 2008, 02:03 PM
Imagine the third world war. Entire populations are dead and you must survive in the devastated urban jungle. You find a deer, and somehow you managed to lure it in your trap. Then comes the slaughter... What would you do to survive?
Have you been watching "I am Legend" lately, by any chance? :D

Gagnraad
Tuesday, July 1st, 2008, 07:04 PM
Have you been watching "I am Legend" lately, by any chance? :D
I did see that movie five minutes after posting it, in fact! :D

But no, I came up with that imaginative impression from a picture I've had for years, foretelling how the world would probably look after a nuclear bomb. ;)

Heiliger Tod
Tuesday, July 1st, 2008, 07:47 PM
I've never done it before so I am really not sure... I would like to know I could but if I couldn't I could attempt to grow my own veg I guess.

Gorm the Old
Tuesday, July 1st, 2008, 09:18 PM
You'd better have a Geiger-Mueller counter handy, Gag. After a nuclear war, there may not be much edible game left in the world. Remember the reindeer that had to be destroyed after the Chernobyl nuclear accident ?

Come to think of it, you probably don't. It happened in April, 1986. Anyway, whole herds of reindeer in the Sami homeland had to be destroyed because their flesh was too radioactive to eat. :eek This was due to fallout. Chernobyl was in Ukraine.

Of course, few plants would be edible either. Better just lie down and die. :~(

Gagnraad
Tuesday, July 1st, 2008, 09:40 PM
You'd better have a Geiger-Mueller counter handy, Gag. After a nuclear war, there may not be much edible game left in the world. Remember the reindeer that had to be destroyed after the Chernobyl nuclear accident ?

Come to think of it, you probably don't. It happened in April, 1986. Anyway, whole herds of reindeer in the Sami homeland had to be destroyed because their flesh was too radioactive to eat. :eek This was due to fallout. Chernobyl was in Ukraine.

Of course, few plants would be edible either. Better just lie down and die. :~(
Yes, of course I am aware of the physical effects of nuclear radiation. But my earlier post was more or less a hypothetical example of what humans are able to do when cornered and are fighting for our very survival.

Concerninc Chernobyl: Did not the radiation alter and mutate several animals in the surrounding areas?
And I do believe we have a thread concerning the Chernobyl-area, where mother nature has taken over the land in, and around Chernobyl. As I have said countless times before, nature will always prevail!

Fafner
Thursday, July 10th, 2008, 08:40 PM
Yes, sure.

It would be a totally natural animal act. I've seen cattle slaughter in the countryside (even goats, and now that I remember, it looked pretty Satanic :P ) so I don't think I would be shocked, although I've never done it myself.

Think it this way: if the cow were human and us cattle, it would surelly slaughter us to eat :D .

Aniketos
Thursday, July 10th, 2008, 10:05 PM
Yes, I could and have done it few times during my visit to my relative's farms.

ladybright
Saturday, July 12th, 2008, 04:56 PM
Upon thought it was clear that I could slaughter, dismember and clean animals to feed my family. I am not sure how well I would do with a cow. Too big or me to move or even be a knocker. I am sure that it would turn out better if someone skilled did it but in a pinch I could.

Resist
Tuesday, October 6th, 2009, 06:14 AM
Yes, I could. I'd prefer a farmer's life than life in the dumphole this city is.

SpearBrave
Wednesday, October 7th, 2009, 12:30 AM
Yes, I could and do. By butchering your own meat you get to pick the better animals. Hogs that are not raised indoors, grass fed beef, chickens without growth hormones, are the best tasting and better for you. It is also a good way for friends and family to come together, you know one of those things we call culture.:thumbup

Nordlander
Wednesday, October 7th, 2009, 01:33 AM
I do not eat much domestic meat just wild game and fish.I do all my own butchering of the deer I kill (one last Saturday) .Having a freezer or two is a must nowadays.I also can (mason jars ) vegetables and fruits and berries for the winter.This is a lost art but a handy one to know.

Kogen
Wednesday, October 7th, 2009, 01:49 AM
I could, as I am not physically retarded.

Although I would rather just let a butcher/hunter do it for me, as they know more about it than I do.

Bärin
Wednesday, October 7th, 2009, 07:11 AM
I don't think so... that's what men in the family are for. :P

Huginn ok Muninn
Wednesday, October 7th, 2009, 07:20 AM
If it had to be done, certainly. I would prefer to not slaughter anything I had raised, if it was an intelligent animal like a pig, though. Go hunting for deer? Fine. Chickens raised on the farm, that would be alright too. I'd rather get beef or pork in a store though.

theTasmanian
Wednesday, October 7th, 2009, 11:32 AM
Well i hunt and eat most of what i hunt doing all the dirty work so i would have no problems with the lot ;)

Paddyboy
Tuesday, October 13th, 2009, 10:58 AM
Yes. I've killed and butchered my own meat many times. Hunting is a hobby of mine.
I did have the misfortune to visit a slaughter-house once and made it a point, never to visit one again (not a nice place) I suppose with hunting, the game has a fair chance and maybe that's the difference, I don't know.
But I know this, I would rather work down a coal-mine, than work in a slaughter-house.
Anyways, I aint gonna become one of them vegan whatsits? anytime soon. I like my meat way too much. :thumbup

Rightpath
Tuesday, October 13th, 2009, 03:23 PM
Yes I would have no problems with this, as I have mentioned in another thread I believe the hunting and subsequent slaughter of animals required for food to be integral to our existance and heritage. It is all too easy to loose sight of the fact that the ability to buy our food neatly packaged from the supermarket or butcher shop is a relatively new thing.

Unfortunately we have allowed ourselves to loose some of the fundamental skills of survival, Hunting and Fire making are good examples of this... and if a major breakdown of society came then we would find ourselves severely hindered by these lack of basic survival skills. IMO everyone should have some basic knowledge of survival skills. Slaughter being one of them.

That said I would not be comfortable with killing an animal for meat unless I knew the quickest and most humane way of doing so.

Einsiedler
Sunday, November 8th, 2009, 06:38 PM
Well, it all depends on how hungry I'd be.

I have no illusions about that.

Æğele Wiğercwida
Monday, May 3rd, 2010, 02:22 AM
When I look at animals I see food. I am a carnivore.

I thought the poll was about technical ability at first.lol It is hard to imagine not being able to kill food.

Preferably I would like to keep my own animals and be self sufficient, but I don't know how to do that.

I do believe we eat too much meat though and that, for health and environmental reasons, we should return to a predominately vegetable diet.

But if I did slaughter my own animals, one thing is for sure....


I would definately mess up skinning it!:D

thoughtcrime
Monday, May 3rd, 2010, 02:32 AM
Yes, certainly. I can somehow understand why some people couldn't get that kind of job done, though. I assume it's a lot easier if you learned to kill your dinner yourself in childhood. Me and my friends often went fishing when we were young, so I'm quite indifferent to killing animals. Of course I don't get any pleasure out of killing a living being, quite the opposite, but somehow I feel better when I know that at least it's done quick and clear, so the only way of ensuring it is doing it myself. Eating meat/fish but not being willing to kill seems hypocritical to me.

Wulfric
Monday, May 3rd, 2010, 02:50 AM
Someone has to do it if you're going to eat meat. I'd rather do it myself in theory, but I haven't killed an animal for the purposes of eating it yet. I do think that meat is eaten a bit too much in today's society.

Holt
Monday, May 3rd, 2010, 03:48 AM
I would most certainly slaughter my own meat. Being willing to eat meat, but not accepting the fact that animals have to die for it seems oddly hypocritical to me. It is much better to do it yourself and know that the job was well done and that the animals were kept in the best way possible, than to buy some anonymous package at the supermarket and having no reference points to how the animal was raised and how it was slaughtered. We have been distanced from the source of our own food.

Freja
Monday, May 3rd, 2010, 12:40 PM
I would most certainly slaughter my own meat. Being willing to eat meat, but not accepting the fact that animals have to die for it seems oddly hypocritical to me. It is much better to do it yourself and know that the job was well done and that the animals were kept in the best way possible, than to buy some anonymous package at the supermarket and having no reference points to how the animal was raised and how it was slaughtered. We have been distanced from the source of our own food.

I agree. I want meat, and would prefer taking it from an animal who has had a good life

I would love to get a hunter´s license, but it´s too expensive at the moment. I used to own a farm, and kept hens and turkeys, and killing those wasn´t a problem. I plan on getting myself a small farm again, I want to keep rabbits too. I imagine killing them will take some getting used to, they´re a bit too cute. But rabbit meat is delicious...

Gary in TX
Monday, May 3rd, 2010, 04:16 PM
Yeah, I could do it.

I'm a hunter, so I've killed and dressed game plenty of times.

Wouldn't be much of a difference to me whether it was domesticated or wild (there's not much of a challenge in putting a round behind a cows ear as opposed to shooting a wild boar/hog or a deer, but the principle is still the same).

I'm not a farmer or a rancher, but many of the guys I work with are and the approach to raising animals for food is completely different than having a pet (usually a dog or a cat). You're not personalizing it by giving it a name, you're just taking care of it's basic needs and making sure that it's healthy so that the meat's good when it comes time for slaughter.

When it comes time to kill and slaughter it then you try and make it's death as clean and as quick and painless as possible. Our ancestors did it all the time. If they wanted a chicken dinner part of the process was wringing the chickens neck or chopping it's head off with an axe, that's where the process of making the dinner started. It didn't come packaged all nice and neat wrapped in plastic for you.

To my way of thinking most people in modern society have tried to get away from unpleasant tasks by having someone else do it to the point where they're practically helpless (some people can't even change a tire on their own). That means that to a large extent that they're usually dependant on someone else. At the very least I like knowing HOW to do things even if I normally wouldn't want to if I had a choice about it.

For the most part I'd rather that someone else do it (just so that I don't have to do it as it's not exactly fun), but I wouldn't be terribly put out if I had to do it to feed my family and myself. It would just be one more unpleasant task that needed to be done. That's just part of life. :shrug

Freja
Monday, May 3rd, 2010, 04:44 PM
Our ancestors did it all the time. If they wanted a chicken dinner part of the process was wringing the chickens neck or chopping it's head off with an axe, that's where the process of making the dinner started. It didn't come packaged all nice and neat wrapped in plastic for you.

To my way of thinking most people in modern society have tried to get away from unpleasant tasks by having someone else do it. That means that to a large extent that they're usually dependant on someone else. At the very least I like knowing how to do things.


I used an axe to chop the chickens´heads off, easy-peasy even for a woman. The first time I did it I had to chop twice, I felt sorry for the chicken... But the next time I did it, I made sure I swung the axe with enough power to avoid unnecessary pain.

My eldest son was very interested in the whole process, and loved being shown the heart and intestines. :P
Even to this day, I usually call the meat exactly what it is when we go to the store - it´s not pork, it´s dead pig. They´re used to it, and subsequently know that the pre-packed meat used to be real, live animals that were killed for our consumption.

Gary in TX
Monday, May 3rd, 2010, 04:49 PM
I used an axe to chop the chickens´heads off, easy-peasy even for a woman. The first time I did it I had to chop twice, I felt sorry for the chicken... But the next time I did it, I made sure I swung the axe with enough power to avoid unnecessary pain.

My eldest son was very interested in the whole process, and loved being shown the heart and intestines. :P
Even to this day, I usually call the meat exactly what it is when we go to the store - it´s not pork, it´s dead pig. They´re used to it, and subsequently know that the pre-packed meat used to be real, live animals that were killed for our consumption.
Well that's awesome that you're like that, unfortunately a large percentage of people don't feel the same way.

I'm sure you know the type of people I mean. They'd probably barf on their shoes if they had to chop a chickens head off. At the very least it would probably make them uncomfortable enough that they wouldn't enjoy their dinner.

Holt
Monday, May 3rd, 2010, 05:05 PM
I agree. I want meat, and would prefer taking it from an animal who has had a good life

I would love to get a hunter´s license, but it´s too expensive at the moment. I used to own a farm, and kept hens and turkeys, and killing those wasn´t a problem. I plan on getting myself a small farm again, I want to keep rabbits too. I imagine killing them will take some getting used to, they´re a bit too cute. But rabbit meat is delicious...

I agree, keeping poultry, rabbits and other small critters really pays off. You can have them in your yard, they all give delicious meat, and some of them keep you with eggs and manure. Bigger livestock like cattle and sheep are a bit more toilsome.

I would urge everyone to get their hunter's license and learn more about the wildlife that surrounds them. Hunting should not be a sport, but a way of sustaining yourself and your family in a healthy and traditional way. The skills and rewards you get from being a respectful hunter are priceless. I have been brought up with hunting and I know I will bring up my own children knowing where their food comes from as well. For the case of Norwegians and Swedes, there is plenty of meat in the woods that can be taken out in a sustainable manner. And besides the ideological pros to hunting – the meat tastes amazing!

arcticdoctor
Monday, May 3rd, 2010, 05:07 PM
This thread is pretty funny. But it still is a sad commentary on how far we

have fallen from those ideal Germanic traits of our Ancestors that we claim

we want to reclaim.



Bear country.

Þoreiðar
Tuesday, May 4th, 2010, 01:30 PM
We have a saying in Norway; "Ikke av hat, bare for mat", which translates into; "Not out of hate, just for food".

It comforts me when thinking about eating the meat of some peaceful and healthy (pre-mortem) animal. It's just a part of the cycle of life, and as long as the animal has been shown proper respect during it's death (and life), I don't think anyone should have any hard feelings.

Hamrammr
Tuesday, May 4th, 2010, 03:26 PM
Yes, growing up on a farm as a 'boer' it is one of the first things you learn to do along with hunting.

perkuns
Wednesday, May 5th, 2010, 08:31 AM
Well, I guess it's a damn good thing I'm not a farmer then huh?

My McAfee security stopped homefront from loading. Check your computer!:-O:thumbdown

perkuns
Wednesday, May 5th, 2010, 09:07 AM
Yes and I have. I used to hunt frequently and still fish every month. The worst was moose hunting above Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada with my cousins husband and a friend. We bagged three and each of us was a bloody, literally, mess after that day was over. I was never so happy to get back to camp as that trip, but you have meat for a winter! Second nastiest was a 400lb/180kilo hog who was quite a boar! Never, never volunteer! Third messiest was an incredibly successful corbina fishing trip to the Salton Sea in the Southern California desert. It just happened that it was the best fishing in over 30 years! I gave up chicken for a month after I helped a friend slaughter 120 chickens for his butcher shop. (See above: Never, never volunteer!) I still fish, but not much hunting here abouts. Yes, no problems with killing anything to eat to live.

perkuns
Wednesday, May 5th, 2010, 09:11 AM
I used an axe to chop the chickens´heads off, easy-peasy even for a woman. The first time I did it I had to chop twice, I felt sorry for the chicken... But the next time I did it, I made sure I swung the axe with enough power to avoid unnecessary pain.

My eldest son was very interested in the whole process, and loved being shown the heart and intestines. :P
Even to this day, I usually call the meat exactly what it is when we go to the store - it´s not pork, it´s dead pig. They´re used to it, and subsequently know that the pre-packed meat used to be real, live animals that were killed for our consumption.

Here I thought I was the only person that called pork "dead pig"!:thumbup HAHA

Freja
Wednesday, May 5th, 2010, 10:56 AM
As the norwegian saying goes; La oss kalle en spade en spade (let´s call a shovel a shovel). It is what it is. :D

A good reminder for everyone!

arcticdoctor
Wednesday, May 5th, 2010, 03:08 PM
I always wondered where that saying originated. It was a common expression

among the mostly Scandinavian people in the farming community where I

grew up in Idaho.

In those days "spade" was a slang term for black males, so I always thought

that was what they were referencing.




1)Approaching Tatitlik.
2)Wild Alaskan Shrimp. Out of the water and in the pan.

YsterNel
Friday, May 7th, 2010, 02:22 PM
The fresher the better, and who else to make sure it is prepared the best way than yourself! ;)

Caledonian
Sunday, October 17th, 2010, 07:29 AM
After a nice hunt with a rifle or bow just give me a nice hunting knife where I'll have that deer strung right up. ;)

[ Then there is the fish after a nice day of fishing to make some nice fillets over a open fire pit in a outside camp like setting.]

theTasmanian
Sunday, October 17th, 2010, 11:39 AM
Disgusting. I am a vegetarian, and I have no qualms about people eating meat, and albeit it may somewhat odd, I have been vegetarian since the age of 4 or so, being the only vegetarian in my family. I do not see how you could kill an innocent beautiful creature, it is abhorrent; you are not tough if you can shoot an animal, kill it, slit it's throat, it makes you a C.U.N.T!

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g226/theMISSIONARY_257/veg.jpg

thats ok they even have a song for us meat eaters

(note its only part of the song)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uE9B0MBrO9w

:-O:P:D

flâneur
Sunday, October 17th, 2010, 12:19 PM
Disgusting. I am a vegetarian, and I have no qualms about people eating meat, and albeit it may somewhat odd, I have been vegetarian since the age of 4 or so, being the only vegetarian in my family. I do not see how you could kill an innocent beautiful creature, it is abhorrent; you are not tough if you can shoot an animal, kill it, slit it's throat, it makes you a C.U.N.T!

I agree...i only eat animals that have commited suicide...lol.

theTasmanian
Sunday, October 17th, 2010, 12:25 PM
AKA road kill....they make a road kill jerky here ;)

nauthiz
Monday, October 18th, 2010, 02:52 AM
I have, I do and always will.

Schubert
Wednesday, October 20th, 2010, 04:44 AM
I have no problem with vegetarians, but I don't understand folks who eat delicious meat, then gasp at the thought of killing it themselves. This is disrespectful to the animal, I believe.

Amerikanerin
Friday, October 22nd, 2010, 10:46 PM
I agree, it's messy and smelly. But I simply love meat too much. ;)

Elessar
Friday, October 22nd, 2010, 11:04 PM
I ask you, which is nobler?

http://aryanism.net/wp-content/uploads/Veganism-3.jpg

To answer the question, I could if I had to, otherwise I'm not in favor of harming innocent animals.
(insert belittling reply about the "un-masculine" nature of Vegetarianism)

Need I remind you National-Socialists here, the Fuhrer was a Vegetarian.

Moreover, if you believe you must eat meat, you can't claim that the slaughtering industry is somehow humane. I've never witnessed such barbarism. If anything I do support "at-home" slaughter as opposed to mass produced, hormone injected trash we call meat.

SpearBrave
Saturday, October 23rd, 2010, 09:50 AM
I ask you, which is nobler?

http://aryanism.net/wp-content/uploads/Veganism-3.jpg



Two things I must point out about this comparison.

1. I wonder what the farmer that is scything wheat will he doing when the weather turns cooler? Perhaps he will be butchering his pigs.;)

2. I don't know what those other people are doing I have never seen any animal killed in such a manner. It seems they are letting the blood out of it while it is still alive.:-O

theTasmanian
Saturday, October 23rd, 2010, 02:41 PM
Two things I must point out about this comparison.

1. I wonder what the farmer that is scything wheat will he doing when the weather turns cooler? Perhaps he will be butchering his pigs.;)

2. I don't know what those other people are doing I have never seen any animal killed in such a manner. It seems they are letting the blood out of it while it is still alive.:-O


Waste of good blood! you could be making Bloodwurst! ;)

flâneur
Saturday, October 23rd, 2010, 05:16 PM
2. I don't know what those other people are doing I have never seen any animal killed in such a manner. It seems they are letting the blood out of it while it is still alive.:-O

Kosher meat......same as halal really except that the morons only get agitated about halal meat.
Its a jewish kosher butcher and his cronies killing the cow by slicing its throat and letting it bleed to death.

Caledonian
Saturday, October 23rd, 2010, 06:07 PM
I ask you, which is nobler?

http://aryanism.net/wp-content/uploads/Veganism-3.jpg

To answer the question, I could if I had to, otherwise I'm not in favor of harming innocent animals.
(insert belittling reply about the "un-masculine" nature of Vegetarianism)

Need I remind you National-Socialists here, the Fuhrer was a Vegetarian.

Moreover, if you believe you must eat meat, you can't claim that the slaughtering industry is somehow humane. I've never witnessed such barbarism. If anything I do support "at-home" slaughter as opposed to mass produced, hormone injected trash we call meat.

Man is a predatory animal so get over yourself.

As for the fuhrer I couldn't give a damn if he ate beans everyday as I wouldn't really care otherwise in that such a past historical person doesn't dominate the every day existence of my life.

Elessar
Saturday, October 23rd, 2010, 06:28 PM
Man is a predatory animal so get over yourself.

As for the fuhrer I couldn't give a damn if he ate beans everyday as I wouldn't really care otherwise in that such a past historical person doesn't dominate the every day existence of my life.

I'm not sure what you're implying by "getting over myself," perhaps you think of it as being pretentious to be vegetarian for a higher purpose.Vegetarianism is a direct consequence of the Aryan principle of universal compassion. Far from its misassociation with hippy caricatures, its most accurate spiritual association is with the warrior archetype, for only those who have thoroughly renounced gratuitous violence (slaughter) can be reasonably entrusted with the means to inflict retaliatory violence.

As for your view of the Fuhrer, I addressed National-Socialists only.

Caledonian
Saturday, October 23rd, 2010, 06:32 PM
I'm not sure what you're implying by "getting over myself," perhaps you think of it as being pretentious to be vegetarian for a higher purpose.Vegetarianism is a direct consequence of the Aryan principle of universal compassion. Far from its misassociation with hippy caricatures, its most accurate spiritual association is with the warrior archetype, for only those who have thoroughly renounced gratuitous violence (slaughter) can be reasonably entrusted with the means to inflict retaliatory violence.

As for your view of the Fuhrer, I addressed National-Socialists only.


As for your view of the Fuhrer, I addressed National-Socialists only.

Great.


I'm not sure what you're implying by "getting over myself," perhaps you think of it as being pretentious to be vegetarian for a higher purpose.

Somthing like that.


Vegetarianism is a direct consequence of the Aryan principle of universal compassion. Far from its misassociation with hippy caricatures, its most accurate spiritual association is with the warrior archetype, for only those who have thoroughly renounced gratuitous violence (slaughter) can be reasonably entrusted with the means to inflict retaliatory violence.
If you think that the world or universe revolves around some sort of mystical universal compassion you are going to be sorely disappointed in life growing up.


the warrior archetype, for only those who have thoroughly renounced gratuitous violence (slaughter)
Any fighting warrior knows that existence revolves around life and death of which struggle or conflict is a regular sequence where it is embraced instead of shunned.


can be reasonably entrusted with the means to inflict retaliatory violence.
The virtuous man is a myth.

There is no nobility in life. There is only success and failure.

Elessar
Saturday, October 23rd, 2010, 06:51 PM
Great.



Somthing like that.


If you think that the world or universe revolves around some sort of mystical universal compassion you are going to be sorely disappointed in life growing up.


Any fighting warrior knows that existence revolves around life and death of which struggle or conflict is a regular sequence where it is embraced instead of shunned.


The virtuous man is a myth.

There is no nobility in life. There is only success and failure.


Your opinions only prove the Aryan is extinct. Only Sudras: 4th Class men
(and I would recommend posting all your thoughts at one time as opposed to constantly editing your posts.)

Caledonian
Saturday, October 23rd, 2010, 06:57 PM
Your opinions only prove the Aryan is extinct. Only Sudras: 4th Class men
(and I would recommend posting all your thoughts at one time as opposed to constantly editing your posts.)

Pointless romanticisms. There never has been a point in history where some ideal utopia or some ideal man has ever existed.

Name a point in time centered around history and I will counter any romanticized notions that you may have.

As for me editing my posts I like to be thorough and I like to clarify all points in mind in a very descriptive or expressive manner somthing of which I think even you can respect.

Elessar
Saturday, October 23rd, 2010, 07:20 PM
Name a point in time centered around history and I will counter any romanticized notions that you may have.



Prior to complex economic civilization, humans lived for perhaps hundreds of millenia in small groups in the wild, where natural selection eliminated people mainly according to their failure to provide food and failure to defend themselves against attackers. Consequently, the root races of that era and their archetypes - whose influences continue to the present day - were created according to distinct lifestyles.

The oldest human lifestyles are gathering and hunting, a direct continuation from the lifestyles of apes. However, whereas human gathering techniques were not significantly different to ape (e.g. gorilla) gathering techniques, human hunting techniques were much more advanced than ape (e.g. chimpanzee) hunting techniques. Thus the hunter archetype dominated, especially outside of Africa. It is expressed in honest tribalists who prefer to use brute force to subdue their victims. (We Aryanists consider the majority of historical and modern humans to belong to this archetype, and call them Gentiles.)

Later, some populations developed a lifestyle of herding, which was much more efficient than hunting. Accompanying changes in selective pressure created a herder archetype. It is expressed in dishonest tribalists who prefer to use deception and manipulation - including pretending to be universalists – to subdue their victims. (We consider a significant and disproportionately influential minority of historical and modern humans to belong to this archetype, and call them Jews.)

Mutations for nobility might have occurred many times in individuals among hunter or herder populations. However, they would have been quickly terminated by natural selection each time they occurred, being maladaptive to the lifestyle of the population. Only when a new lifestyle of farming was first developed by some populations were conditions anomalously suitable for such traits to thrive and form a new farmer archetype. It is expressed in honest universalists unwilling to victimize others for their own benefit. These were the original Aryans.

Some theories (favoured by Alfred Rosenberg) posit that degraded but discernible Aryan genetics continued for a time in the ruling classes of early historical dynasties, which would account for them being on the whole better than the masses they ruled (hence the term ‘aristocracy’), though still far from the Golden Age ideal with the exception of a few individuals. Ruling classes were generally more conscious of breeding than the masses when it came to mate selection, but this does not imply that they chose according to Aryan standards, and even if they did, this does not imply that ideal choices were always available.

Other theories (favoured by Joseph Goebbels) posit that Aryan genetic continuities in the ancient world might have persisted among the most rural and isolated peasant farming communities, where – in contrast to urban environments - daily life was least affected by increasingly complexifying economy. But records are lacking that refer to especially noble peasant cultures, partly because records rarely focus on rural life in the first place, and partly because the vast majority of rural communities would still have been non-Aryan even if such theories were true.

Another possibility is that Aryan individuals were most likely to be drawn towards ascetic religious orders of antiquity which both actively selected for aspects of nobility among its membership and offered an alternative environment to the degenerate mainstream civilization. Such orders tended to promote celibacy and therefore functioned as focused exit points of Aryan genetics. This does not imply that absence of such orders would have significantly increased the Aryan demographic, as it is not religion but innate nobility that causes Aryans to be far less prolific than non-Aryans.

What makes veganism pertinent in the context of our movement is that it allows currently non-vegan anti-Zionists to see in themselves a direct equivalence of the Jewish attitude they so despise, and hence understand that such an attitude is far from limited to Jews alone. Humanism is to non-humans what Judaism is to non-Jews; each has its Goys, and both treat them cruelly beyond description. Many anti-Zionists have pointed out that external revolution must be preceded by internal revolution, in this case that overthrowing Jewish domination cannot occur until the rest of humanity first defeats what they call the ”inner Jew”. We agree, and propose that the most obvious step in defeating the ”inner Jew” is to cease having Goys of our own! It is disgraceful hypocrisy for non-Jewish humans to complain about their treatment by Jews while ignoring their own treatment of non-human animals, and such hypocrites do not deserve to defeat Zionism. It is also clear that expansion of the anti-Zionist movement into a general anti-tribalist movement cannot proceed without stressing humanism as one of the most prevalent forms of tribalism.

With such barbaric cultural foundations (which the Gentiles, being associated with the even more primitive hunting lifestyle, had no trouble accepting), Freemasonic and Marxist platitudes attempting to feign idealism by envisioning a “brotherhood of man” sound disgusting in comparison to the Aryanist demand for an end to all enslavement, non-human as well as human. When Zionist agents are rejected not because we see through their deceptions but because we are repulsed even by what they claim to offer, only then are we truly ready for a better world.

Anselm
Saturday, October 23rd, 2010, 07:55 PM
I wouldn't do it, because, to me, it's a betrayal to the animal. Even if they're well cared for, and that's certainly not the case with factory farming, you still break a trust by killing them. I'd feel like the witch from Hansel and Gretel. "Get fat and strong so I can eat you."

I grew up hunting and I have killed deer and squirrels, but once I realized that you could not only survive without eating animals, but thrive and lesson your chances of many degenerative and chronic diseases, I never looked back.

If I were starving I'm sure I'd eat anything, but under normal circumstances I'd never kill another animal.

theTasmanian
Sunday, October 24th, 2010, 02:07 AM
Prior to complex economic civilization, humans lived for perhaps hundreds of millenia in small groups in the wild, where natural selection eliminated people mainly according to their failure to provide food and failure to defend themselves against attackers. Consequently, the root races of that era and their archetypes - whose influences continue to the present day - were created according to distinct lifestyles.

The oldest human lifestyles are gathering and hunting, a direct continuation from the lifestyles of apes. However, whereas human gathering techniques were not significantly different to ape (e.g. gorilla) gathering techniques, human hunting techniques were much more advanced than ape (e.g. chimpanzee) hunting techniques. Thus the hunter archetype dominated, especially outside of Africa. It is expressed in honest tribalists who prefer to use brute force to subdue their victims. (We Aryanists consider the majority of historical and modern humans to belong to this archetype, and call them Gentiles.)

Later, some populations developed a lifestyle of herding, which was much more efficient than hunting. Accompanying changes in selective pressure created a herder archetype. It is expressed in dishonest tribalists who prefer to use deception and manipulation - including pretending to be universalists – to subdue their victims. (We consider a significant and disproportionately influential minority of historical and modern humans to belong to this archetype, and call them Jews.)

Mutations for nobility might have occurred many times in individuals among hunter or herder populations. However, they would have been quickly terminated by natural selection each time they occurred, being maladaptive to the lifestyle of the population. Only when a new lifestyle of farming was first developed by some populations were conditions anomalously suitable for such traits to thrive and form a new farmer archetype. It is expressed in honest universalists unwilling to victimize others for their own benefit. These were the original Aryans.

Some theories (favoured by Alfred Rosenberg) posit that degraded but discernible Aryan genetics continued for a time in the ruling classes of early historical dynasties, which would account for them being on the whole better than the masses they ruled (hence the term ‘aristocracy’), though still far from the Golden Age ideal with the exception of a few individuals. Ruling classes were generally more conscious of breeding than the masses when it came to mate selection, but this does not imply that they chose according to Aryan standards, and even if they did, this does not imply that ideal choices were always available.

Other theories (favoured by Joseph Goebbels) posit that Aryan genetic continuities in the ancient world might have persisted among the most rural and isolated peasant farming communities, where – in contrast to urban environments - daily life was least affected by increasingly complexifying economy. But records are lacking that refer to especially noble peasant cultures, partly because records rarely focus on rural life in the first place, and partly because the vast majority of rural communities would still have been non-Aryan even if such theories were true.

Another possibility is that Aryan individuals were most likely to be drawn towards ascetic religious orders of antiquity which both actively selected for aspects of nobility among its membership and offered an alternative environment to the degenerate mainstream civilization. Such orders tended to promote celibacy and therefore functioned as focused exit points of Aryan genetics. This does not imply that absence of such orders would have significantly increased the Aryan demographic, as it is not religion but innate nobility that causes Aryans to be far less prolific than non-Aryans.

What makes veganism pertinent in the context of our movement is that it allows currently non-vegan anti-Zionists to see in themselves a direct equivalence of the Jewish attitude they so despise, and hence understand that such an attitude is far from limited to Jews alone. Humanism is to non-humans what Judaism is to non-Jews; each has its Goys, and both treat them cruelly beyond description. Many anti-Zionists have pointed out that external revolution must be preceded by internal revolution, in this case that overthrowing Jewish domination cannot occur until the rest of humanity first defeats what they call the ”inner Jew”. We agree, and propose that the most obvious step in defeating the ”inner Jew” is to cease having Goys of our own! It is disgraceful hypocrisy for non-Jewish humans to complain about their treatment by Jews while ignoring their own treatment of non-human animals, and such hypocrites do not deserve to defeat Zionism. It is also clear that expansion of the anti-Zionist movement into a general anti-tribalist movement cannot proceed without stressing humanism as one of the most prevalent forms of tribalism.

With such barbaric cultural foundations (which the Gentiles, being associated with the even more primitive hunting lifestyle, had no trouble accepting), Freemasonic and Marxist platitudes attempting to feign idealism by envisioning a “brotherhood of man” sound disgusting in comparison to the Aryanist demand for an end to all enslavement, non-human as well as human. When Zionist agents are rejected not because we see through their deceptions but because we are repulsed even by what they claim to offer, only then are we truly ready for a better world.

If you think for a second that the earliest hunter's gave the slightest care(other than an area has lots of them) about the Animal they killed for survival then you are deluded

It was about Survival caring for the animal only care latter as a luxury!
modern Deer management techniques(for Hunting not Farming) that were arguably founded by Hermann Wilhelm Göring :D are perhaps a fine example off the latter caring for the wild populations of "food animals"

Not trying to poke you to hard with a pointy stick(although you might be seen as a food source one day :P ) but to look back at the Hunter gatherer is to look back at people barely surviving care was not high on the list

Enter the "Herder" they had to care for the flock....but they still like many farmers today don't bat an eye at killing them for food ;)

Elessar
Sunday, October 24th, 2010, 02:27 AM
If you think for a second that the earliest hunter's gave the slightest care(other than an area has lots of them) about the Animal they killed for survival then you are deluded

It was about Survival caring for the animal only care latter as a luxury!
modern Deer management techniques(for Hunting not Farming) that were arguably founded by Hermann Wilhelm Göring :D are perhaps a fine example off the latter caring for the wild populations of "food animals"

Not trying to poke you to hard with a pointy stick(although you might be seen as a food source one day :P ) but to look back at the Hunter gatherer is to look back at people barely surviving care was not high on the list

Enter the "Herder" they had to care for the flock....but they still like many farmers today don't bat an eye at killing them for food ;)

I don't think you're wrong, Alaric likes to nitpick and argue. ;)

Caledonian
Sunday, October 24th, 2010, 02:32 AM
I don't think you're wrong, Alaric likes to nitpick and argue. ;)

Yeah..........That's it...... :|

flâneur
Sunday, October 24th, 2010, 10:04 AM
I grew up hunting and I have killed deer and squirrels,

Just out of curiosity what does squirrel taste like...?

I ask because recently on my travels i was asked to try something with the assurance that i would like it.
It was actually wild donkey meat and was raw,it had been left to marinate overnight in vinegar and crushed garlic.
When it was sliced and put into the vinegar it was a deep red colour and in the morning was light pink in colour....and to my amazement tasted like tuna.

SpearBrave
Sunday, October 24th, 2010, 10:59 AM
Squirrel has very wild taste to it if you like that sort thing.:)

I like to squirrel hunt and eat a few of them from time to time, mostly I give them to a old man and woman who love to eat them. Since they are on a very low fixed income I'm sure the appreciate the meat.

If I don't thin the squirrels out here I would be over run with them in less then a year. They eat things in my garden. Besides hunting squirrels can be very challenging with a .22 rifle, they actually hide from you on the top side of branches making it difficult to get a head shot.

flâneur
Sunday, October 24th, 2010, 11:06 AM
What we call "Game" here in England.
I was just wondering if was comaparble to any other meat like rabbit or hare.

I understand what you are saying though,when i ate some wild boar in Bavaria it tasted wild and nothing like pork at all.

SpearBrave
Sunday, October 24th, 2010, 11:15 AM
I did not use the term "gamey" or " game" as I did not want to confuse it with being slightly rotten, I have heard those terms applied in both ways.:)

Yes, I would compare squirrel to wild Hare or Rabbit, only a stronger taste to it.

Wild Boar can be very strong and pungent. Some jackass released a breeding population here several years back. Guess what they bred and bred and bred, now they are in the White River valley and tearing everything up. We can kill wild boar anytime we want. Most people prefer regular pork as compared to wild boar. I did shoot a wild sow once it was not so bad.

flâneur
Sunday, October 24th, 2010, 11:23 AM
I prefer the wild boar myself,if its done right.The people i knew in Bavaria knew all the secrets about cooking it and preserving it in sausages etc...really good eating.;)...when washed down with some decent German beer.

I saw some Japanese business men when was living in Germany come on a shooting trip and when they had shot a boar they had a cook with them who gutted the animal on the spot to see if it had any truffles or wild mushrooms in its intestinal tract,how they could tell i dont know.If the search was successful they sliced it into edible lttle circles and cooked it on the spot in the woods on a portable little stove the cook had with him.
No accounting for some peoples taste,the rest of the boar they gave away to the beaters.

OneWolf
Tuesday, October 26th, 2010, 03:58 AM
I did not use the term "gamey" or " game" as I did not want to confuse it with being slightly rotten, I have heard those terms applied in both ways.:)

Yes, I would compare squirrel to wild Hare or Rabbit, only a stronger taste to it.

Wild Boar can be very strong and pungent. Some jackass released a breeding population here several years back. Guess what they bred and bred and bred, now they are in the White River valley and tearing everything up. We can kill wild boar anytime we want. Most people prefer regular pork as compared to wild boar. I did shoot a wild sow once it was not so bad.


We also have wild boar in Oklahoma.It is a cross between a domestic pig and
a Russian Boar.Some farmer released them in the wild and they became a
problem for farmers in no time at all.

I have not hunted for them since I was younger but we would hide in the cattle
feeders and about dusk,here they would come.One thing I noticed about them
is they are really tough to bring down.I shot one with a .243 and it did not drop.

A lot of people around that area eat them and some have gotten sick from
some of the meat.I don't know if it was ill-prepared or what but from what I
have heard it was pretty serious.

tomtom
Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010, 01:31 AM
I could NOT slaughter my own meat. I have been a vegetarian ever since I graduated from high school. I love animals too much to ever consent to harming one. However, everyone has a right to their own perspective......I am just voicing my own opionion.

Ulfvaldr
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 05:13 PM
I believe some animals are put on this earth just for that purpose. I call them feeder animals.

heksemester
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 05:46 PM
I use to live on out in the country when I was younger, so I have killed and butchered a lot chickens and rabbits.

I also use to work at a viking reenactment center where I have slaughtered
and eaten some Icelandic sheep. Also did some hunting once, but breaking my teeth on lead I dislike.... it must be done by hand.

Its very nice to know how your meat lived and died, very natural and a good feeling. For me personally it enhances the dining experience and I can enjoy It with a clear conscious, knowing that the animal was not mistreated...

What is messy and disgusting is the meat industry !

Fyrgenholt
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 06:09 PM
I've witnessed chickens killed on a local free range (very free range) farm, and although I've never slaughtered my own meat before I think if I knew how to do so quick and successful, I could.

I'd rather know where my meat came from, how it lived and how it died, than take it from a box I'd bought from Tesco and kept in the freezer for a week.

The closer I can live to nature the happier I am.

Thorolf
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010, 06:17 PM
Ive killed things before. I have not had to kill something i raised, but i don't think it would bother me. I watch most of the deer and rabbits and stuff around here, so in a way i'm attached, but i have no problem killing them for food.Normally when i kill something i tell it sorry and finish it quick, no big deal everything has to die sometime.

Isabella
Friday, February 18th, 2011, 12:51 PM
NO WAY
That would be like killing a family member
I have a dream for when I retire to move out to the country and live on a farm with loads of animals and just live harmoniously with them and not kill any of them, they're all gonna be so happy :) CANNOT WAIT!

Eiriksson
Friday, February 18th, 2011, 03:34 PM
some time ago I realised that my body has best performance on dairy products fishes, and veg food. most types of meat stinks to me( especially when it's raw or while being cooked) besides my skin doesn't produce any odour on such diet.

I caught, killed, cleaned fishes since ever, sometimes I felt little remorse for them, but as long as I kill only what I need, I feel ok.

Nooitgedacht
Sunday, February 20th, 2011, 01:16 PM
What I've found was that most people who have a problem with meat, don't mind killing human babies with abortions.

Isabella
Sunday, February 20th, 2011, 01:29 PM
What I've found was that most people who have a problem with meat, don't mind killing human babies with abortions.

Wow, what a delightful sweeping comment to make. Lunch with you would be fun :)

Hammish
Sunday, February 20th, 2011, 05:10 PM
I lived most of my life in a Rocky Mountain state famous for it's hunting and fishing.

Not only have a butchered or processed any wild game I harvested, I also butchered domestic animals for my family's use, from time to time.

My first child only had wild game for meat until she was about 2 and didn't like beef when she first tasted it, preferring deer and elk.

Bearkinder
Sunday, February 20th, 2011, 08:03 PM
Certainly.

Especially chickens -- nasty animals, and sheep -- some of the dumbest, filthiest animals around.

I'd like a cow, but for the dairy products, not to eat, until it got old.

Pigs are good too. They multiply very quickly and produce good meat while eating just about anything you'll feed them.


some time ago I realised that my body has best performance on dairy products fishes, and veg food. most types of meat stinks to me( especially when it's raw or while being cooked) besides my skin doesn't produce any odour on such diet.

I caught, killed, cleaned fishes since ever, sometimes I felt little remorse for them, but as long as I kill only what I need, I feel ok.

Not sure I understand this.

I've met a lot of people who say they don't eat meat, but eat fish.

Animal muscle = meat. Eating fish is eating meat. Or maybe I misunderstood your post??

Eiriksson
Sunday, February 20th, 2011, 09:58 PM
Certainly.
4


Not sure I understand this.

I've met a lot of people who say they don't eat meat, but eat fish.

Animal muscle = meat. Eating fish is eating meat. Or maybe I misunderstood your post??

It's not about ideology, more about taste and kind of intuition, my body feels much better when I eat fishes.
besides: Poikilotherms don't have souls ;)

Oslaf
Sunday, March 6th, 2011, 12:28 AM
I have done so, and could do so again without question.

Rocky v
Monday, March 7th, 2011, 04:59 AM
I have helped my parents and extended family do live cows and pigs from start to finish. I would need more experience and knowledge to do it own my own correctly.

chaostrip
Thursday, March 10th, 2011, 05:17 AM
Kill it yes, but im not to sure about cleaning it correctly. Im not totally sure what parts to keep, and what parts to cook....

Oslaf
Saturday, March 12th, 2011, 07:27 PM
Kill it yes, but im not to sure about cleaning it correctly. Im not totally sure what parts to keep, and what parts to cook....

It depends on what you're talking about. Generally, the only organs you might want to keep are the heart and the liver. Any meat is good. There are some optional parts too, but it all depends on the animal.

MountainGuardian
Monday, March 14th, 2011, 10:16 AM
I already do slaughter my own meat....

We eat goat, sheep, chicken, rabbit, deer, Elk all slaughtered and prepared by my wife and I.

Steinbrugge
Monday, March 14th, 2011, 10:50 AM
Anyone not at least willing to try slaughtering/hunting/preparing their own meat really aught to stick with veggies, its kind of hypocritical to refuse to kill an animal but be ok with nipping to tescos and buying some steak !!!

Northumbria
Friday, January 6th, 2012, 04:46 PM
I thought about this subject many times. Then I took a job on a farm at Christmas time one year. ;) I killed a few thousand Turkeys, it is quite sad really how they were so docile they'd walk to their deaths. Only 4 showed any signs of comprehension but they still didn't run.
I don't think many people enjoy killing animals, but it is what is needed.

It was when I was around 16 (I did it ever year when I'm short of money) and the first 5 or so I thought about it, after that the cultured thoughts died away and I didn't really care.

I've never actually seen a woman do it yet, some probably do I suppose, but ones I know have panicked whenever so much as the cat has brought home a baby rabbit between it's jaws.

Elfriede
Sunday, January 8th, 2012, 08:07 PM
I plan on having animals (chickens, goats, etc...) one day and while I don't think that I personally would slaughter them, I would be OK if someone else was to do it. My parents slaughtered and cleaned dear when I was younger so maybe I am just used to the idea. Killing the animal seems a bit like "man's work" although I'm sure that's not necessarily true. I would have an easier time cleaning and cooking it, I think.

renownedwolf
Sunday, January 8th, 2012, 08:32 PM
Yes I have done, and it is more satisfying to me to, hunt/trap then kill, clean and eat your own meat.