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Ewergrin
Thursday, November 4th, 2004, 04:15 AM
Of course we know that all trees are sacred, but what trees are you faorite ones to behold, or that you hold a particular fondness for?

Oak tree
These are very common in Louisiana. An old man amongst trees, they demand respect of anyone walking by.
http://www.jsr.communitech.net/joan/oak.jpg

Silver Maple
There are two full grown Silver Maples on our property, and a young one growing fast! A very beautiful tree to behold.
http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/n_resource/wetlands/images/p05pic1.jpg

Slash Pine
Probably the most prolific tree in my region, these are everywhere. The same goes for all varities of pine.
http://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/graphics/trees/117_1.jpg

Bald Cypress
Another immensley popular tree in my region. It's natural habitat being the swamps and marshes all over the southern United States.
http://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/graphics/trees/27_1.jpg

Deodar Cedar
A haunting tree that is common here, particularly in the wetlands.
http://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/graphics/trees/43_1.jpg

Southern Magnolia
More popular in the middle of the state than my immediate area. It's a splendid tree whose flowers are amazing.
http://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/graphics/trees/13_1.jpg

Ewergrin
Thursday, November 4th, 2004, 04:17 AM
http://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/browsetrees.cfm

An amazing website, chock-full of information about trees. I took several of the images in this thread from this site. Please visit it!

Ewergrin
Thursday, November 4th, 2004, 04:19 AM
River Birch
My father in law has one of these on his property. Amazing tree with a magnificent, flakey, multicoloured bark.
http://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/graphics/trees/22_1.jpg

PsycholgclMishap
Thursday, November 4th, 2004, 05:21 AM
California's most important treasure and natural resource:
Coast Redwood

http://beardcommunity.com/php/phorum/download.php/5,6495,455/ima-redwood.jpg

http://www.karto.ethz.ch/neumann/travelling/usa_westcoast_05_2002/07_oregon_caves_redwood_highway_no_1_wes tcoast_25_05_2002/10_andi_with_fallen_redwood_tree.jpg

Anne14
Thursday, November 4th, 2004, 05:27 AM
Weeping Willows! Sooooo beautiful!

PsycholgclMishap
Thursday, November 4th, 2004, 05:31 AM
Monterey Cypress

http://www.flex.net/~lonestar/ca2003/cypress.jpg

http://caot.lacitycollege.edu/112/FinalBaileysTravel/images/www.llbean.com%20PointLobos.jpg

Mistress Klaus
Thursday, November 4th, 2004, 12:36 PM
:D I love all trees. But I have always had a love & attraction for pines, conifers (latin term..meaning "to bear cones"), Junipers, Spruces etc. I have planted many species on my property. Only small at the moment:( ...but they are healthy, happy & growing quite vigorously..also planted some native trees to Australia for balance & to attract the birds.


The Norway Spruce is beautiful...I would love one of these in my garden.

Allenson
Thursday, November 4th, 2004, 03:34 PM
Great thread by a tough question! ;)

For trees that are native to my region: Balsam Fir, Eastern Hemlock, Red Maple, Beech and Tamaracks are some of my favorites.

Balsam Fir-
http://www.domtar.com/arbre/p_beau.htm
http://www.cbs.umn.edu/herbarium/gallery/balsam%20fir.htm

Eastern Hemlock-
http://www.treeguide.com/Species.asp?Region=NorthAmerican&SpeciesID=1096
http://www.colby-sawyer.edu/academic/ces/herbarium/gymnosperms/tscanadensis.html
http://www.hcs.ohio-state.edu/hcs/TMI/Plantlist/ts_ensis.html

Red Maple-
http://woodmagic.forprod.vt.edu/Kids/woodid/Maple.htm
http://www.fcps.k12.va.us/StratfordLandingES/Ecology/mpages/red_maple.htm

Beech-
http://valleyexplore.com/walk/bonnechere/shaw.htm
http://www.hope.edu/academic/biology/naturepreserve/Trees/Faggra.htm

Tamarack-
http://members.shaw.ca/nrawlyk/Tamarack.html
http://www.tomandwoods.com/newsletter/tamarack.html

One 'exotic' tree that I've seen before that I was quite fond of, is the Serbian Spruce:

http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&lr=&q=%22serbian+spruce%22

WarMaiden
Thursday, November 4th, 2004, 05:18 PM
I'm old fashioned and like Oak Trees the best!!

Telperion
Saturday, November 6th, 2004, 03:59 AM
Beech and Silver Birch are my especial favourites. But, I am fond of all trees.

Nefertari
Monday, November 8th, 2004, 05:43 PM
Weeping Willows! Sooooo beautiful!

I'm with Anne on this. Weeping Willows are my favourite and always have been.

http://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/graphics/trees/30_1.jpg

She-Wolf
Wednesday, November 10th, 2004, 07:29 PM
An oak tree or a forest fir with some snow on it

AryanKrieger
Wednesday, November 10th, 2004, 07:53 PM
An oak tree or a forest fir with some snow on it

My favourites too.

Wayfarer
Friday, November 12th, 2004, 04:45 PM
Trees I particularly like are Rowan, Scots Fir and Silver Birch.

Willowsprout
Monday, November 15th, 2004, 02:39 AM
Weeping willow near a nice pond, Who would have guessed lol

God's Helm
Monday, November 15th, 2004, 11:37 AM
I really like a lot of tree actually. Each has something I like about them. However, the one that I am most currently fascinated with is a tree I have heard called "Redwood Dawn". I ran across one quite accidentally about a years ago and I planted one at my home and am thinking about others. It looks kind of like it has the trunk of a cypress or some type of hickory/elm combination. And (here is the cool part) it's "leaves" look like little ferns. It sheds them in the fall. Interesting.

Thorsson
Friday, November 19th, 2004, 08:52 PM
Oak trees are by far my favorite. I feel it is important to have a deep admiration for all of our natural world and that we should help to preserve it as best as possible.

Cheers

Vanir
Tuesday, January 18th, 2005, 02:52 PM
Ahh! What a really good thread!
No doubt, my #1 is the Eucalyptus Regnans or the Victorian Mountain Ash.
Driving through the hills through a mountain ash forest is almost religious for me.
They grow up to 90-100 metres tall, standing amongst a forest of them in silence, in the cold victoria hills, it is a moving experience that never fails to affect me.
Anyone who visits Tasmania or Victoria should take the time to see one of these trees, they are spectacular. The picture below does not nearly do them justice! I shall try to find a photograph that captures their majesty.
http://www.viridans.com.au/EUCS/1314AVDN.JPG
http://www.viridans.com.au/EUCS/E1314.HTM

though my everyday favourite at the moment is the red-flowering gum (Corymbia ficifolia), they are in bloom at the moment, with larger 15m high examples common, and are literally covered in flowers, they are very healthy this year and beautiful to behold. Also they attract many Rainbow Lorikeets, which are an entertaining & colourful species that is making a comeback here in SE Victoria, they are very gregarious and have alot of character. Strolling amongst a stand of heavily flowering examples of this tree whilst Rainbow Lorikeets caper & carry on whilst feeding is the definition of stress relief for me. Again, this is not the best photo of one, this one is rather small, and not flowering very well at all (compared to the specimens near my house)
http://farrer.riv.csu.edu.au/ASGAP/jpg/950319a.jpg
http://www.gould.edu.au/seashores/webpages/coastalwebcare/rbowlorikeet.jpg

My other favourite at the moment is the Coastal Banksia (Banksia Integrifolia). I've been planting alot of tubestock of this species in the reserve adjacent to my house, as they have been breaking at the trunk & falling over. Drought leaves this species susceptible to longhorn beetle larvae, the tree has not enough moisture to wrap the larvae in a kind of resin, which is its defense, so the larvae runs amok, and literally bores out the insides of the tree, eventually killing it. Not fun when 20m high trees collapse suddenly and consistently next to your house!
Anyway, this tree is my hardluck case, and I've become attached to them, and they are also very beautiful when healthy and flowering, and form the backbone of large coastal flora.
Here's a pic of one in flower with a red wattlebird having its dinner
http://www.members.optusnet.com.au/~tiwaz/banksiaintegrifolia.jpg

There are many more trees that have a place in my heart (Huon Pine, Redgum, etc) but these are the main three.

Anders

Mistress Klaus
Tuesday, January 18th, 2005, 04:16 PM
Anders Lang...
I take it..you live in Australia? Me also..:thumbsup
Australia has some of the most beautiful & unique birds & trees in the world.

Although I love growing conifers/pines, herbs & cacti,..I also have my array of Australian native trees & bushes in my garden. My new sapling Grevillea "Honey Gem" is/has already attracted honey eating birds (perched..so delicately on a fine new born branch...bending over to carefully extract the sweet nectar from the apricot/golden yellow flowers.)..... My Banksia (ericifolia) is about to sprout its orange crowning blooms.. My other native trees & shrubs are doing well......... Waterhousea Floribunda (weeping Lilly Pilly)..Queensland Maple (Flindersia brayleyana)...Tinkling Satinash (Syzygium alatoramulum), Melaleuca incana, Callistemon Wilderness White, and many others. I love birds...and I want them in my garden.:P Even though they dive-bomb my cats...:haha I don't believe the usual domestic 'house cat' can actually grab & kill a bird. The birds terrorize the cats.:-D

Vanir
Tuesday, January 18th, 2005, 05:06 PM
Yep, I'm an Aussie too! I have a Banksia Ericifolia too! Only young but it is soming along. I have a Grevillea out the front, but it isn't getting enough light it seems, and is flowering poorly. IIRC Grevilleas prefer a slightly acid pH, so you might want to optimize your soil (if you want to be pedantic) though Australian natives are hardy once rooted. It's good to see that someone else is into planting native too! Some of that slow-release Oates low phosphorous fertilizer works well too I've found.

Quite an impressive little array of natives you're cultivating! Very good to see!!!!! I hope your garden converts as many people to native gardeing as possible!

If you can afford it, there are some brilliant grafted hybrids around that are an excellent investement. About $30-$40 should buy you a healthy, energetically growing Eucalyptus ficifolia and Eucalyptus ptychocarpa grafted hybrid (Summer Red or Summer Beauty). They grow fast, don't get too large (small tree/large shrub size) and flower intensively. Kind've an uber-native. Growing in a large pot is one way to control size in a small backyard (for a nice mini-tree effect) here's something on them http://www.hotkey.net.au/~sparrows1/sgap/sgap7b.html
and a pic of its flowers closeup
http://homepages.ihug.com.au/~amaltman/tarsierman/summer-red.jpg

I'm experimenting with some expensive liquid plant hormones to see if I can manipulate teh growth cycle of the coastal banksias I've planted. They can take years to get going, so fast-forwarding it would be nice :)

Something else I'm trying to find is a commercial source of the newly isolated compound gavinone
http://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/stories/s1219989.htm
which is the isolate from smoke that promotes vigorous growth in native plants, such as you see after a bushfire. Seems the Australian Bush has evolved to respond rapidly to fire. Imagine having some to apply to a row of Summer Reds....

Viciously vigorous growth!!!!!

Your cats will kill if they get the chance, trust me.
It's not a problem in suburbia though, and if they can kill Sparrows, Indian Mynahs, Pigeons, and other immigrant pest species (I could name other immigrant pests too)
In reserve areas though, foxes and cats can literally destroy sensitive wren populations etc in short order.

I'll stop rambling now, or I'll never shut up.
Anders

Vojvoda
Tuesday, January 18th, 2005, 07:26 PM
One 'exotic' tree that I've seen before that I was quite fond of, is the Serbian Spruce:

http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&lr=&q=%22serbian+spruce%22

I like that one too :D

anaktas
Wednesday, January 19th, 2005, 09:32 AM
A vast pine forest!

Allenson
Wednesday, January 19th, 2005, 09:46 PM
I like that one too :D


I thought that you would. ;)

Are you at all familiar with this tree?

Vojvoda
Thursday, January 20th, 2005, 12:19 AM
I thought that you would. ;)

Are you at all familiar with this tree?

Central Serbia is filled with them,that's all I know(see my avatar :D ).I guess that's why they call the central region "Silvania" , a stone's throw away from "Transylvania" :D

Midtown Bootboy
Thursday, February 3rd, 2005, 05:56 PM
I love the classic Pecan Tree :)

Mac Seafraidh
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 05:03 AM
Birch of course since I lived in New Hampshire for quiet a long time. Only when I was little, I had fun tearing the bark off of them. I only mentioned a tree that i've actually seen visually because I have lived in quite a few states and New England has the best ones.

Gorm the Old
Monday, April 25th, 2005, 02:19 AM
I am especially fond of spruces, particularly blue spruce and Engelmann spruce. Several years ago, I did a painting of Going-to-the-Sun Mountain in Glacier National Park and, exercising my artistic license, I replaced the monotonous forest of Douglas fir and lodgepole pine in the foreground with one of blue, Engelmann, black, and Norway spruce, interspersed with western larch and a few of the original firs and pines. All of these species do grow in the park, though not in that particular spot. Viewers of the painting have commented on the beauty of the forest, not realizing that it doesn't look anything like the one that is actually there.

Scáthach
Wednesday, April 27th, 2005, 11:40 PM
cherry blossoms, oaks, and monkey puzzle trees..they're strange.

Sigel
Thursday, April 28th, 2005, 08:41 AM
I like most trees but I have a certain reverence for the Yew. A sacred tree and the essential source of the finest long bow wood.

Mistress Klaus
Thursday, April 28th, 2005, 01:07 PM
I am especially fond of spruces, particularly blue spruce and Engelmann spruce. Several years ago, I did a painting of Going-to-the-Sun Mountain in Glacier National Park and, exercising my artistic license, I replaced the monotonous forest of Douglas fir and lodgepole pine in the foreground with one of blue, Engelmann, black, and Norway spruce, interspersed with western larch and a few of the original firs and pines. All of these species do grow in the park, though not in that particular spot. Viewers of the painting have commented on the beauty of the forest, not realizing that it doesn't look anything like the one that is actually there.
:) I would love to see your painting. (sounds beautiful)

green nationalist
Thursday, April 28th, 2005, 01:22 PM
.... and monkey puzzle trees..they're strange.

They are immigrant trees, blow in's like the potato.

Gorm the Old
Friday, April 29th, 2005, 02:41 AM
SKADI, right at present the painting is in storage while painting and redecorating are being done in my home. Once I can get access to it again, I'll try to take a photo of it and send it to you.

imported_Armin
Sunday, May 1st, 2005, 08:25 PM
. . . . . . .

Odin Biggles
Monday, May 2nd, 2005, 03:51 PM
I too like oak trees, they're alot of them where I take my dogs sometimes.

Vanir
Monday, May 2nd, 2005, 04:27 PM
Here's a read for anyone interested...

The World's Tallest, Biggest and Oldest Trees
http://isaac.org.au/bigtrees.htm#world

There are many hobbies that one can choose. Stamp collecting, gardening, climbing tall trees. REALLY tall trees.

Former ISAAC Australian Tree Climbing Champion and international representative, Tom Greenwood, does exactly that. He travels around south-eastern Australia, with assistance from Brett Mifsud, in search of Australia's tallest trees. When he finds them, he measures them. Not all that unusual, you say. Not until you realise he does it with a tape measure, from the top of the tree!

Tom has measured many tall trees and has graciously agreed to publish the tallest of the tall and the biggest of the big on our website. Thanks Tom.

The tallest reliably documented tree ever measured was the Thorpdale Tree, a Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans) growing at Thorpdale in Victoria, Australia. The tree was measured at 112.8m (370 feet) standing and 114.3m (375 feet) on the ground after it was felled in 1884. As you can see below, this is just a little taller than the living record holder; however, the Coast Redwoods are still growing and it is likely that some will eventually surpass this height. To see some of Australia's giant trees, have a look here http://www.nre.vic.gov.au/virtualexhibition/trees. The five tallest known trees in Australia are all in the Styx Valley, Tasmania.

For the desperately patriotic Aussie, there is still hope. Several strong but unverified reports of Mountain Ash were recorded at over 122m (400 feet) during the nineteenth century. As most were felled at the time, it is almost certain that no such tall trees currently exist. We can hope, however, that if we preserve enough of our forested areas that one day these tallest of the tall will once more grace our planet.

Tallest
The tallest living trees are Coast Redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) growing in California, USA. These trees regularly exceed 100m and the tallest is the Stratosphere Giant, currently 112.6m (369 feet, 4.8in) (http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com).

Biggest
The most massive trees are the Sierra Redwoods or Big Trees (Sequoiadendron giganteum), also growing in California. The largest, the General Sherman, is estimated at 2,000 tons (http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com).

Oldest
The USA also boasts the oldest living trees currently verified, Bristlecone Pine (Pinus longaeva). The largest recorded ring count for a Bristlecone Pine is 4,867 (http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com).

Australia can claim a little bit of glory in the age stakes in having the oldest genetically identical stand of trees. While no individual in this stand of Huon Pine (Lagarostrobos franklinii) in Tasmania is especially old by world standards, clones of the original tree have stood on the site for at least 10,500 years (http://www.dpiwe.tas.gov.au/inter.nsf/WebPages/BHAN-5494LA?open).

Huon Pines can be 2,000 years old and are Australia's oldest living trees.

Australia may be set to claim the world's oldest tree record, as two specimens of the world's rarest eucalypt, the Mongarlowe Mallee (Eucalyptus recurva), which grow 40 metres apart, may be part of the same original tree. If so, they are estimated to be 13,000 years old! If not, the individuals themselves may be 3,000 years old, making them Australia's oldest trees (http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/npws.nsf/Content/Eucalyptus+recurva+a+mallee+draft+recove ry+plan).

We also may have the oldest living plant, King's Holly (Lomatia tasmanica), with a clonal colony possibly up to 43,000 years old (http://www.parks.tas.gov.au/veg/lomatia/lomatia.html).

Sigurd
Wednesday, November 22nd, 2006, 07:42 PM
Bumping this thread, as I hope that it may be one that some of the newer members contribute to. ;)

Blood_Axis
Wednesday, November 22nd, 2006, 08:47 PM
Every single one of those trees is magnificent.

So here's a "greek" tree from my part:

http://www.istrianet.org/istria/flora/images/olive-tree.jpg

http://www.hotgardens.net/Olive_tree_Swan_Hill.JPG

http://www.azurs.net/photos/olive_verte_gros_plan.jpg

Not nearly as beautiful in the eye, but I love the way it smells :thumbsup

Alice
Sunday, February 24th, 2019, 09:47 AM
I've really grown to like birch trees, and there are plenty of them in my neighbourhood.

http://i68.tinypic.com/201qvq.jpg

Mööv
Sunday, February 24th, 2019, 02:03 PM
I always had a thing for birches. Have many of them at home.

Finnish Swede
Sunday, February 24th, 2019, 02:12 PM
I simply love Wulnut trees :thumbup. None of those grows in Finland (naturally) :( ... but I have plant 4 of those into our garden (2 comes from North America and 2 from Asia).
http://suomalainentaimi1.online.fi/wp/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/jalop%C3%A4hkin%C3%A4.jpghttps://www.viherrinki.fi/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/japaninsiipipahkina-puutarhurisi-valitsema-viherrinki.jpg

Horse-chestnuts. There are 2 different kinds in our garden.
http://www.sarkanperennataimisto.fi/kuvat/Aesculus%20hippocastanum%20balkaninhevos kastanja.jpg

Plus old oaks are beautiful.

Finnish Swede
Sunday, February 24th, 2019, 04:11 PM
I've really grown to like birch trees, and there are plenty of them in my neighbourhood.

http://i68.tinypic.com/201qvq.jpg


Alice...do you know what that photo brings to my mind :)?
These: https://d2pptc4exyus09.cloudfront.net/puzzle/185/566/original.jpg

Alice
Sunday, February 24th, 2019, 04:15 PM
Alice...do you know what that photo brings to my mind :)?
These: https://d2pptc4exyus09.cloudfront.net/puzzle/185/566/original.jpg

Is that what I think it is? Kantarell? :) I forgot the English name, but I really want to make soup now.

Finnish Swede
Sunday, February 24th, 2019, 05:11 PM
Is that what I think it is? Kantarell? :) I forgot the English name, but I really want to make soup now.

Yes... chanterelles.

I remember years ago then one of my father's French work colleague visited in Finland ... and he (and his wife in France) exactly hoped to find some ''clean'' chanterelles. Well...me and my mother went to forest and picked up some fresh one for him. Man looked very happy.

Víðálfr
Sunday, February 24th, 2019, 10:32 PM
:yggdrasil: Yggdrasil, of course! :wsg


Other than that, I love all trees... so it's hard to choose just a few species...

But because this is a nice thread... I'll choose some random trees that I like...

First... let's begin with oak trees! :D I have some soft spot for these because of family history! ;)

So... I love Quercus robur species!

114525 114526 114527 114528

And I also love Quercus rubra (red oak (https://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/visiting-woods/trees-woods-and-wildlife/british-trees/common-non-native-trees/red-oak/))! I would love to have some like these nearby:

114529 114530 114531 114534

Branches of an old Quercus rubra in spring: 114533


I love old trees... but also young ones, age doesn't matter! :P

Alice
Monday, February 25th, 2019, 04:08 AM
Almond trees, prunus dulcis. They remind me of where I grew up.

http://i68.tinypic.com/fpaywk.jpg

http://i68.tinypic.com/2w4035v.jpg

Jacaranda, too!

http://i63.tinypic.com/aca9ev.jpg

http://i65.tinypic.com/14d3qme.jpg

westenra
Thursday, February 28th, 2019, 12:35 PM
Birch, Spruce and Willow trees are my favorite.

J.Yaxley
Sunday, March 3rd, 2019, 04:08 AM
I have a soft spot for the American Tulip Poplar. It's the largest native hardwood tree in North America:

https://bgwguitars.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/5.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/73/35/65/733565e535b18026d9f399cedfe2d11b.jpg

I've heard there are some extremely impressive examples in North Carolina.

jagdmesser
Sunday, March 3rd, 2019, 09:45 AM
Universal ancient sacredness of Holly


https://images.unsplash.com/photo-1510749291343-404b62fefa30?ixlib=rb-1.2.1&ixid=eyJhcHBfaWQiOjEyMDd9&w=1000&q=80

One of the most striking features of Holly is it universal sacredness to all developed pre-Christian cultures throughout the world, especially with its properties for prophetic dreams, hallucinations and magic. It is arguably the most sacred plant of human history considering its association to hero, myth and ritual. Throughout Europe holly was believed to repel evil, & this belief lingers to the modern day. An old tradition of bringing holy boughs into one's house in winter, as a place for good fairies to play, is echoed down to our own era, when holly wreaths are brought indoors for Christmas, to await the arrival of the winter elf king Santa.


It was long regarded as unlucky to leave these holly wreaths up after Twelfth Night, so it was consigned to the fireplace on New Year's Eve. Others felt that good luck could be obtained by keeping a sprig from a holly wreath that had been used as a Yuletide decoration within a church, hence the wreathes would be cut to pieces to divide among church members. The Celts of the British Isles & Gaul believed the Holly King ruled over death & winter, whereas the Oak King ruled life & summer. This ancient (conceivably originally Druidic) belief was preserved into medieval times in mummers' plays,& has modernly been adapted to the Druidic revival & other pagan systems of faith. The Holly King was a warlike giant who bore a great wooden club made of a thick holly branch. He found his way into Arthurian Legend as the Green Knight, who challenged Sir Gawain during a Yuletide feast, baring as his weapon "a solitary branch of holly."


In Scandinavian mythology the Holly belonged to Thor & Freya. Holly's association with Thor's lightning meant that it could protect people from being struck by bolts. Norsemen & Celts would plant a holly tree near their homes specifically to take lightning strikes & protect a house & its inhabitants. The crooked lines of the holly leaves probably gave rise to the association with lightning, as well as the fact that hollies do conduct lightning into the ground better than most trees, with the least injury to the tree. So too Freya or Frigga had authority over weather, & if Thor was the lightning, Freya was the thunder. The Grimms' Fairy Tale of "Mother Holly" (or "FrauHolda") is a recollection of Frigga compounded with an even more ancient Earthmother named Hulta ("Elderberry") involved with a rich Mythology of the Elderberry Tree.


In the charming tale of Mother Holly, her troublemaking cat sets off all sorts of bad weather by getting into Mother Holly's things. He then eats Mother Holly's corn. When Mother Holly discovers the mischief the cat has done, she doesn't punish the cat, because the corn caused the kitty's stomach to rumble as with thunder, a sound that pleased her.


Although Mother Holly of the Grimms' tale is a winter hag or witch associated with the holly because it is a winter fruit-baring tree, she also had a maidenly spring & summer aspect, when she was associated with the Elderberry Tree which flowers in spring & fruits in summer. As Frau Holda, then, she is identifiable not just with Teutonic Frigga, but with the Scandinavian goddess Hulda or Hulta. Much of Freya's holly mythology at a more archaic level regarded Hulda's two aspects of maidenly life-giving (with the edible summer-fruiting Elderberry) & crone death-bringing (with the poisonous winter-fruiting Holly).


In Shinto mythology the Japanese holly (I. crenata) held a similar position as that of the holly in Europe. When the Sun-goddess Amaterasu withdrew into her cavern & refused to come out, the erotic clown-goddess Uzume hung a sacred jewel & a sacred mirror in the branches of a holly, & began to dance about the black-fruited holly tree in a humorously sexy manner to attract the attention of Amaterasu & draw her out of the cavern so that Spring would begin. A luck-charm is down to the present day sold in Japan, consisting of a glass ball etched with holly leaves, symbolic of Amaterasu's mirror, jewel, & tree. As an aside, it cannot be coincidental that when Demeter withdrew into hiding & winter fell upon the land, it was a similar Clown-goddess, Baubo, who while dancing in an effort to cheer up Demeter, suddenly mooned the Goddess with her buttocks, on which a face had been painted, winning from Demeter her only laughter of the season.


In another Japanese legend, Prince Yamato, one of the greatest of the doomed heroes of history & myth, was said to have done battle with a spear the handle of which was made of holly wood, a symbol of divine authority.


A New Years charm popular in Japan consists of a holly leaf & skewer. This represents the Buddhist monk-god Daikoku. Once when he was about to be attacked by an oni devil, the rat that dwelt with Daikoku as a friendly companion hurried into the garden to fetch the monk a holly branch, bringing it to him in the nick of time, since an oni devil will not go near holly. To this day, there lingers a rustic Japanese tradition of hanging a holly sprig on the door to the house to keep away devils, not at all unlike numerous holly-related beliefs in Europe.


In the American southeast & southwest, yaupon holly (I. vomitoria) was used in mystic cultic practices, over imbibed to induce vomiting & hallucination as a purification ritual. Archeologists have found ritual shell-cups with the evaporated holly residue dating to 1,200 BCE. There are only intimations of what the yaupon holly myths within this ancient cult may have been, but it was sacred to the Cherokee & Creek at least into the 1930s.


In South America, the Guarada people tell the tale of the bearded god Pa-i-shume who taught many things to mortals, including how to make the stimulating & health-giving mate beverage from the leaves of the Paraguayholly tree (I. paraguayensis).


Considering how widespread holly mythology is, the Romans may have independently regarded the holly as sacred, but it is more likely they coopted its ritualistic use from the Celts, hanging winter sprigs upon images of Saturn during winter's violently erotic Saturnalia.



The (Solstice) Yule Tree


Yule marks the longest night of the year -- the triumph of the dark half of the year. Night and darkness have reached their apex and the Wheel turns to restore balance. The dawn heralds the return of the sun, bringer of light, warmth, and growth. In the days following Yule, the sun’s power grows steadily, encroaching upon the night, pushing back the darkness.


The Yule tree, the Holy Tree (“Holly Tree”) (recognized in modern times as the “Christmas tree”) is an ancient symbol of life, fertility and vitality. In the ancient German Saxon culture, the Holly Tree, the Yule Tree just outside Marburg was considered the most sacred because it had been planted by a descendent of the cuileann (Holy ‘men’).


The Yule Tree (Holy Tree) itself was equivalent to Stonehenge to the ancient Germans in that the arrival of the Holy men represented the saving of the ancient hunter gatherer tribes from hell, cannibalism, human sacrifice and starvation to organized society. To them, it represented the start of the Earth and the source of all life.


On coming to the throne in 768, the Christian Emperor Charlemagne launched a vicious campaign of evangelism against the Saxons of Germany. The first thing he did was cut down the Holly Tree, effecting desecrating the most sacred living icon of all Saxons.



Holly and Christianity


In spite of Charlemagne best efforts, no other plant is more sacred to Christian history than the Holly, in spite of the fact that it is not native to any part of the Middle East or North Africa.


Holly as the wood of the cross


Holly is one of the trees said to be the tree of Christ's cross. Legend tells us that the trees of the forests refused the defilement of the cross, splintering into tiny fragments at the touch of the axe. Only the holly behaved like an ordinary tree, allowing itself to be cut and formed into a cross. It is as a Passion symbol that holly is found in pictures of various saints. It's presence indicates that the saint is either reflecting upon Christ's Passion or foretelling it.


Holly as the crown of thorns


In Germany, holly is called Christ dorn in memory of Christ's crown of thorns. According to legend, the holly's branches were woven into a painful crown and placed on Christ's head while the soldiers mocked him saying, "Hail, King of the Jews." The holly's berries used to be white but Christ's blood left them with a permanent crimson stain. German tradition still call Holly by the name “Christ’s Thorn”



Holly and the birth of Jesus


Another legend about this Christmas plant says that a little orphan boy was living with the shepherds when the angels came to announce the birth of the newborn king. Having no gift for the baby, the child wove a crown of holly branches for its head. But when he lay it before Christ, he became ashamed of it's poverty and began to cry. Miraculously, Jesus touched the crown and it began to sparkle while the orphan's tears turned into beautiful scarlet berries.



Holly protecting the “holy” family from Herod


Holly was believed formerly to have been deciduous, until Herod's soldiers came to slay the baby Jesus. At Mary's request, the holly tree regained its leaves in winter so that her infant could be hidden in the foliage.



Fact and fiction


While many other plants and often weeds (such as Mistletoe) have been deliberately or ignorantly raised up as having ancient significance to our ancestors, no other plant is more universally sacred, more universally mysterious than the Holy Tree, the “Holly”.


Holly Tree | Wreath | Jesus (https://www.scribd.com/document/53749683/Holly-Tree) 03 Feb 2019.



One of the most striking features of Holly is it universal sacredness to all developed pre-Christian cultures throughout the world, especially with its properties for prophetic dreams, hallucinations and magic. It is arguably the most sacred plant of human history considering its association to hero, myth and ritual. Throughout Europe holly was believed to repel evil, & this belief lingers to the modern day. An old tradition of bringing holy boughs into one's house in winter, as a place for good fairies to play, is echoed down to our own era, when holly wreaths are brought indoors for Christmas, to await the arrival of the winter elf king Santa.


It was long regarded as unlucky to leave these holly wreaths up after Twelfth Night, so it was consigned to the fireplace on New Year's Eve. Others felt that good luck could be obtained by keeping a sprig from a holly wreath that had been used as a Yuletide decoration within a church, hence the wreathes would be cut to pieces to divide among church members. The Celts of the British Isles & Gaul believed the Holly King ruled over death & winter, whereas the Oak King ruled life & summer. This ancient (conceivably originally Druidic) belief was preserved into medieval times in mummers' plays,& has modernly been adapted to the Druidic revival & other pagan systems of faith. The Holly King was a warlike giant who bore a great wooden club made of a thick holly branch. He found his way into Arthurian Legend as the Green Knight, who challenged Sir Gawain during a Yuletide feast, baring as his weapon "a solitary branch of holly."


In Scandinavian mythology the Holly belonged to Thor & Freya. Holly's association with Thor's lightning meant that it could protect people from being struck by bolts. Norsemen & Celts would plant a holly tree near their homes specifically to take lightning strikes & protect a house & its inhabitants. The crooked lines of the holly leaves probably gave rise to the association with lightning, as well as the fact that hollies do conduct lightning into the ground better than most trees, with the least injury to the tree. So too Freya or Frigga had authority over weather, & if Thor was the lightning, Freya was the thunder. The Grimms' Fairy Tale of "Mother Holly" (or "FrauHolda") is a recollection of Frigga compounded with an even more ancient Earthmother named Hulta ("Elderberry") involved with a rich Mythology of the Elderberry Tree.

In the charming tale of Mother Holly, her troublemaking cat sets off all sorts of bad weather by getting into Mother Holly's things. He then eats Mother Holly's corn. When Mother Holly discovers the mischief the cat has done, she doesn't punish the cat, because the corn caused the kitty's stomach to rumble as with thunder, a sound that pleased her.

Although Mother Holly of the Grimms' tale is a winter hag or witch associated with the holly because it is a winter fruit-baring tree, she also had a maidenly spring & summer aspect, when she was associated with the Elderberry Tree which flowers in spring & fruits in summer. As Frau Holda, then, she is identifiable not just with Teutonic Frigga, but with the Scandinavian goddess Hulda or Hulta. Much of Freya's holly mythology at a more archaic level regarded Hulda's two aspects of maidenly life-giving (with the edible summer-fruiting Elderberry) & crone death-bringing (with the poisonous winter-fruiting Holly).


In Shinto mythology the Japanese holly (I. crenata) held a similar position as that of the holly in Europe. When the Sun-goddess Amaterasu withdrew into her cavern & refused to come out, the erotic clown-goddess Uzume hung a sacred jewel & a sacred mirror in the branches of a holly, & began to dance about the black-fruited holly tree in a humorously sexy manner to attract the attention of Amaterasu & draw her out of the cavern so that Spring would begin. A luck-charm is down to the present day sold in Japan, consisting of a glass ball etched with holly leaves, symbolic of Amaterasu's mirror, jewel, & tree. As an aside, it cannot be coincidental that when Demeter withdrew into hiding & winter fell upon the land, it was a similar Clown-goddess, Baubo, who while dancing in an effort to cheer up Demeter, suddenly mooned the Goddess with her buttocks, on which a face had been painted, winning from Demeter her only laughter of the season.

In another Japanese legend, Prince Yamato, one of the greatest of the doomed heroes of history & myth, was said to have done battle with a spear the handle of which was made of holly wood, a symbol of divine authority.

A New Years charm popular in Japan consists of a holly leaf & skewer. This represents the Buddhist monk-god Daikoku. Once when he was about to be attacked by an oni devil, the rat that dwelt with Daikoku as a friendly companion hurried into the garden to fetch the monk a holly branch, bringing it to him in the nick of time, since an oni devil will not go near holly. To this day, there lingers a rustic Japanese tradition of hanging a holly sprig on the door to the house to keep away devils, not at all unlike numerous holly-related beliefs in Europe.

In the American southeast & southwest, yaupon holly (I. vomitoria) was used in mystic cultic practices, over imbibed to induce vomiting & hallucination as a purification ritual. Archeologists have found ritual shell-cups with the evaporated holly residue dating to 1,200 BCE. There are only intimations of what the yaupon holly myths within this ancient cult may have been, but it was sacred to the Cherokee & Creek at least into the 1930s.

In South America, the Guarada people tell the tale of the bearded god Pa-i-shume who taught many things to mortals, including how to make the stimulating & health-giving mate beverage from the leaves of the Paraguayholly tree (I. paraguayensis).

Considering how widespread holly mythology is, the Romans may have independently regarded the holly as sacred, but it is more likely they coopted its ritualistic use from the Celts, hanging winter sprigs upon images of Saturn during winter's violently erotic Saturnalia.
The (Solstice) Yule Tree


Yule marks the longest night of the year -- the triumph of the dark half of the year. Night and darkness have reached their apex and the Wheel turns to restore balance. The dawn heralds the return of the sun, bringer of light, warmth, and growth. In the days following Yule, the sun’s power grows steadily, encroaching upon the night, pushing back the darkness.


The Yule tree, the Holy Tree (“Holly Tree”) (recognized in modern times as the “Christmas tree”) is an ancient symbol of life, fertility and vitality. In the ancient German Saxon culture, the Holly Tree, the Yule Tree just outside Marburg was considered the most sacred because it had been planted by a descendent of the cuileann (Holy ‘men’).


The Yule Tree (Holy Tree) itself was equivalent to Stonehenge to the ancient Germans in that the arrival of the Holy men represented the saving of the ancient hunter gatherer tribes from hell, cannibalism, human sacrifice and starvation to organized society. To them, it represented the start of the Earth and the source of all life.


On coming to the throne in 768, the Christian Emperor Charlemagne launched a vicious campaign of evangelism against the Saxons of Germany. The first thing he did was cut down the Holly Tree, effecting desecrating the most sacred living icon of all Saxons.



Holly and Christianity


In spite of Charlemagne best efforts, no other plant is more sacred to Christian history than the Holly, in spite of the fact that it is not native to any part of the Middle East or North Africa.


Holly as the wood of the cross


Holly is one of the trees said to be the tree of Christ's cross. Legend tells us that the trees of the forests refused the defilement of the cross, splintering into tiny fragments at the touch of the axe. Only the holly behaved like an ordinary tree, allowing itself to be cut and formed into a cross. It is as a Passion symbol that holly is found in pictures of various saints. It's presence indicates that the saint is either reflecting upon Christ's Passion or foretelling it.


Holly as the crown of thorns


In Germany, holly is called Christ dorn in memory of Christ's crown of thorns. According to legend, the holly's branches were woven into a painful crown and placed on Christ's head while the soldiers mocked him saying, "Hail, King of the Jews." The holly's berries used to be white but Christ's blood left them with a permanent crimson stain. German tradition still call Holly by the name “Christ’s Thorn”



Holly and the birth of Jesus



Another legend about this Christmas plant says that a little orphan boy was living with the shepherds when the angels came to announce the birth of the newborn king. Having no gift for the baby, the child wove a crown of holly branches for its head. But when he lay it before Christ, he became ashamed of it's poverty and began to cry. Miraculously, Jesus touched the crown and it began to sparkle while the orphan's tears turned into beautiful scarlet berries.



Holly protecting the “holy” family from Herod



Holly was believed formerly to have been deciduous, until Herod's soldiers came to slay the baby Jesus. At Mary's request, the holly tree regained its leaves in winter so that her infant could be hidden in the foliage.



Fact and fiction


While many other plants and often weeds (such as Mistletoe) have been deliberately or ignorantly raised up as having ancient significance to our ancestors, no other plant is more universally sacred, more universally mysterious than the Holy Tree, the “Holly”.


Holly Tree | Wreath | Jesus (https://www.scribd.com/document/53749683/Holly-Tree) 03 Feb 2019.

Herr Rentz
Sunday, March 3rd, 2019, 02:34 PM
Most conifers, plus Paper Birch, Linden, Dogwood, and Aspen.

Gareth Lee Hunter
Sunday, March 3rd, 2019, 03:09 PM
Lilly and I prefer to plant small to medium size Acacia trees within our outdoor sanctuary. They are much easier to maintain and far less messy in the Fall.

We do have a few beautifully flowering Desiduous trees though; although they clutter our rock gardens with leaves dropped during Autumn.

Víðálfr
Sunday, March 3rd, 2019, 11:22 PM
Lilly and I prefer to plant small to medium size Acacia trees within our outdoor sanctuary.
I love Acacia trees!!! Their flowers smell so nice, especially the white ones! Do you make Acacia honey too? :P It's one of my favourite types of honey!

As I said... I love old trees...

Example: Sequoia Gigantea!


https://youtu.be/JrwKBdrCllQ


https://youtu.be/BC4stXaRORM


https://youtu.be/K8YXSuwZoPo

It's the same tree filmed from different angles... It is one of the few trees like that in Europe and it is located in Băile Herculane, Romania. I hugged this tree! :heartso

Would be nice to visit its other siblings in Europe... and especially its siblings in those magnificent national parks in North America:


https://youtu.be/42N0JKA6vvo


https://youtu.be/MglBOaOnzqM


https://youtu.be/FWi2bn40ma4

SpearBrave
Monday, March 4th, 2019, 10:07 AM
I love all trees and shrubs given I have a degree in Arboriculture, I really can't pick just one, I will just name a few.

Tsuga canadensis- Canadian Hemlock

Fraxinus excelsior- European Ash

Ilex opaca -American Holly

Quercus alba- White Oak

Elizabeth
Monday, March 4th, 2019, 11:31 AM
I'm not familiar with many trees. I am a city girl. There are palm trees where I live, and some other trees but I don't know what they are called.

I've seen photos of birch trees and I like their white bark. So I'll say my favorite is the birch tree. :)

jagdmesser
Monday, March 4th, 2019, 12:54 PM
'What magic is there in the ancient yew tree? What is it in them that fires our vision and fills the soul with mystery, touching ageless history?


We associate our yew trees with our churchyards. There we constantly find them gracing the church and spreading their great arms among the graves. And many people may tacitly assume that the 'old folk' planted yews in churchyards. But no! The great yew trees can be 2,000 years old , or 3,000 or, in some cases, they may reach 4,000 years or more and our churches were mostly built less than 1,000 years ago. The yews came first, planted on sacred sites known to the Druids. The later church builders were sensitive to the holy places and knew where to build their churches. So let us awaken to the wonder of the yews, planted long before the churches were built and linked with ancient pre-Christian ritual and mystery.


What a marvel is the ancient yew! It is claimed that the great yew could be absolutely immortal! Grasp what it is doing. The central complex of bole and trunk often seems like a number of trees flowing into each other to make an entity of incredible strength. Then the branches around the central trunk dip down and reroot themselves so that, as a virtually new tree, they may send out further branches. Thus theoretically at least, the process can go on till the ringed complex covers a great area.


Our imagination is fired by this tree. Once we have 'seen' a yew tree, then it becomes fascinating to study the complex bole and and see how the streams of energy flow along its ribs. Our imaginative vision can merge with the wondrous structure. Theoretically, the yew tree could be ageless and never die, the central trunk like a compact pillar of immense strength.


Alas that through ignorance and indifference many great trees in our churchyards have been destroyed as inconvenient. But they are sacred trees and it is vital that we recover this knowledge. Preserving the great yews is a duty that we owe to our forebears, to the history of our countryside and to those who come after us.' Sir George Trevelyan.


'One tree had always stood out. Though used for long bows, the Yew's regenerative powers and the poisonous nature of its leaves and seeds denied its use for other things. So many were spared the axe and grew to gnarled old age - patriarchs of a fast disappearing forest, things of wonder, mystery and imagination. They became special meeting places where decisions were taken, secrets shared, a place of reverence and worship, for the sacred tree could kill or cure.'

David Bellamy, Naturalist.

The Sacred Yew by Anand Chetan and Diana Brueton from... 04 Mar 2019.
(http://yandex.ru/clck/jsredir?bu=6nvs&from=yandex.ru%3Bsearch%2F%3Bweb%3B%3B&text=&etext=2081.DNc5K5m0eXjyPjy1cYpMIBS-TNHmbv_FAyUGqfLZj5Y.95a89cc5e12686083667 e10695b47a1f013b603c&uuid=&state=PEtFfuTeVD5kpHnK9lio9dFa2ePbDzX7fH _cbK-eu2V8J4cbFpzDXW9rYi7SZhqEJIq8fXhATr5ZDzT C0wt8G6bX8g-J368jbY2G9qdTREc,&&cst=AiuY0DBWFJ5Hyx_fyvalFLFfOiIpZKkuWKuM iVL_0z28AblzcHUSfuja-jiqeyewI1kOxK415rE1FSwWIjXV5pHH5BAraOHCW LcCLOUoDEhTZXTXPr1IclezE3kRKNRZu4zz2wAzf Hiv_di6N1A06iDtFjCfyp9gLMkbe1lzwZkzU3ckd ftNblTo_QkTXrqoBKhjvynuOgbIMNIwRXeQ878ja zBeuOvmze7ZT58Gl6VCvEKPAgu-pvluBLsd_hKzIo2vSif4bibN1fmz9eZxqlsvR1PO x3NlKZYutal6Us9FF0dJJqJzqOqTvQZHgc4U41pX CA8eVoztEipY79dzTa8pFSUjuPUIUhCrv-sryaxGFiO1UIqDSYM2voI955DY3_qs7uB6N5IvjM Ebg3xc5oGYdlSvg9lEjRR4pvv3zTdRwo-IMBjVzdeI8VGts8wl2Uky50dkv8cyg8ElA3PEgC6 2BSwVeE6KGqfD9xqyQ_yukJJUmNpvjzNp7cmQpwk u&data=UlNrNmk5WktYejR0eWJFYk1LdmtxaTItbE9 aekN1bDRVcjVRUS0xMHg0NVJKMW5YV0Z5WThJUTN ZaF8tNFBOVnFuWjlkeHY5UGRRZUY2dzZHRF9kSDd oUFBOZFVxTGNwMndzLTk1VkM5UmQ0Y2gwSmJGMlB GVHRRdG84WVJhV1A,&sign=ce8a6402297486a2c26428ac774ef578&keyno=0&b64e=2&ref=orjY4mGPRjk5boDnW0uvlrrd71vZw9kpgxai g6M7pAvo4XFkfy2t5RoqHJr3nHuAO0FiZpINMLy_ oIlHxoJOAvak6Hq_rrpP&l10n=ru&rp=1&cts=1551702998841&mc=3.937444876540854&hdtime=1013552.5)









The yew has given its name to many places in Ireland. Co Mayo, for example, comes from the Irish Magh Eo, meaning ‘Plain of the Yew’. The village near where I live is called Virginia, but in Irish its name is Achadh an Iúr, which means ‘Field/ Meadow of the Yew’.Incidentally, the townland I live in is called Billis, which in Irish is na Bilí, meaning ‘sacred tree’. Just down the road from my house is the hugest yew tree with the broadest trunk I have ever seen. It stands on private land, so I knocked on the owner’s door, hoping to find out a little of its history, but no-one was home. Could it possibly be the sacred tree Billis is named after?



https://aliisaacstoryteller.files.wordpress.com/2015/08/yew-billis.jpg?w=561&h=1000

Sacred Trees of Ireland | The Yew | aliisaacstoryteller (http://yandex.ru/clck/jsredir?bu=6nw6&from=yandex.ru%3Bsearch%2F%3Bweb%3B%3B&text=&etext=2081.DNc5K5m0eXjyPjy1cYpMIBS-TNHmbv_FAyUGqfLZj5Y.95a89cc5e12686083667 e10695b47a1f013b603c&uuid=&state=PEtFfuTeVD5kpHnK9lio9daDl0Ow0EQqBn wXqr2CGSTlhSDEzIy2U1LCcDQlKH1XsOdC84l50n mNodXoKu3ehAgSIp-2PS4Hk7ygL2X9DL5EPZTCkpwXmeHODcBGhA_cdAG ApSL0hXX2zg3qXy9IRA,,&&cst=AiuY0DBWFJ5Hyx_fyvalFLFfOiIpZKkuWKuM iVL_0z28AblzcHUSfuja-jiqeyewI1kOxK415rE1FSwWIjXV5pHH5BAraOHCW LcCLOUoDEhTZXTXPr1IclezE3kRKNRZu4zz2wAzf Hiv_di6N1A06iDtFjCfyp9gLMkbe1lzwZkzU3ckd ftNblTo_QkTXrqoBKhjvynuOgbIMNIwRXeQ878ja zBeuOvmze7ZT58Gl6VCvEKPAgu-pvluBLsd_hKzIo2vSif4bibN1fmz9eZxqlsvR1PO x3NlKZYutal6Us9FF0dJJqJzqOqTvQZHgc4U41pX CA8eVoztEipY79dzTa8pFSUjuPUIUhCrv-sryaxGFiO1UIqDSYM2voI955DY3_qs7uB6N5IvjM Ebg3xc5oGYdlSvg9lEjRR4pvv3zTdRwo-IMBjVzdeI8VGts8wl2Uky50dkv8cyg8ElA3PEgC6 2BSwVeE6KGqfD9xqyQ_yukJJUmNpvjzNp7cmQpwk u&data=UlNrNmk5WktYejY4cHFySjRXSWhXRkRLejV LLXZvU0M3Wm54eTBSc3lTNzBkRXZMR1JSd3hkdVZ pQmFHSXpNQjFQM3ZsdGNwNkM2UXJYWXF1X252Z29 FaEM4Tlk4YXZhSTh4NzM5RVZKc1ZMaXYyUmRrUW0 1S2pScUVDTXJsQWVvMUx3YzV2MzhUMHczN2h2RnV HSWNNTGVtaWoyY2Y0dXc5THh1WVVreEZaM2xLNkN oODVEOUEsLA,,&sign=5938301a393c9a868cb78618370a2800&keyno=0&b64e=2&ref=orjY4mGPRjk5boDnW0uvlrrd71vZw9kpgxai g6M7pAvo4XFkfy2t5RoqHJr3nHuAO0FiZpINMLy_ oIlHxoJOAvak6Hq_rrpP&l10n=ru&rp=1&cts=1551703281924&mc=5.175187296563544&hdtime=1296634.5)
aliisaacstoryteller.com (https://aliisaacstoryteller.com/) The yew is a long-lived tree; it is thought it can survive to the ripe old age of 9500 years, although it is hard to accurately date due to the unique way in which it grows.





https://youtu.be/g6oMqi4y7wE

Alice
Monday, March 4th, 2019, 01:24 PM
The yew is very sacred and beautiful, jagdmesser.

I like cherry blossom trees a great deal, and there were several near my old flat.

http://i63.tinypic.com/hs54z7.jpg

Astragoth
Monday, March 4th, 2019, 02:10 PM
The yew is very sacred and beautiful, jagdmesser.

I like cherry blossom trees a great deal, and there were several near near my old flat.

http://i63.tinypic.com/hs54z7.jpg

I remember the cherry blossoms of Washington D.C. Its one of the most beautiful parts of that city.

Alice
Monday, March 4th, 2019, 02:15 PM
I remember the cherry blossoms of Washington D.C. Its one of the most beautiful parts of that city.

That's what I've heard; it must be a very lovely sight to behold.

Astragoth
Monday, March 4th, 2019, 03:46 PM
That's what I've heard; it must be a very lovely sight to behold.

It is. The problem is the rest of the city is a ghetto.

Volk und Rasse
Tuesday, March 5th, 2019, 01:00 AM
The european oak

Besidea other native trees, Ginkgo biloba.
The problem is they can smell pretty bad.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KzDBne5TJ2Q