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Erntearbeiter
Saturday, April 24th, 2004, 03:07 AM
Heathen is a purely germanic term. It quite simply has come to mean a person who is not a member of the religions that branched from the cult of Abraham, such as Christianity, Islam and Judaism. In each of these books they look down upon the native peoples and their religions, as needing to be converted or, in case of Islam, destroyed. The Koran literally goes into rants about killing heathens "where ever ye find them." Heathen, the word, is of germanic origin. It refers to the Heath or Heather, a meadow where lowlying shrubs and flowers grow in Europe. A Heathen would be an 'uncivilized' person who would live away from the cities and towns, sticking to the old customs, and not intergrating with the metropolitan, new christian religion of Europe. In about every other Germanic language Heathen is used to describe these people. In german it is "Heide," in swedish it is "Hedning," and so on. They each come from their languages versions of 'heath' (In swedish 'Hedning' comes from 'Hed'), which means there is some 'proto-germanic' connection.
Pagan comes from the latin "Paganus," which means 'country dweller' or 'civilian'. They are used in just about the same way and have similar meanings. Yet one is germanic and the other is italic. Which one should we call ourselves? Well I guess it depends on which meta-ethnicity you want yourself to be associated with. I prefer Heathen.

Ewergrin
Saturday, April 24th, 2004, 03:23 AM
A linguistic approach. I had often wondered myself what the differences were. Fortunately, for me, I am not as picky. Pagan. Heathen. Virtually the same thing.

Ewergrin
Saturday, April 24th, 2004, 03:25 AM
Also, it seems to me that "pagan" is often used to describe the Anglo-Saxons in the pre-christian era.

Ewergrin
Saturday, April 24th, 2004, 03:26 AM
Seems I was wrong.

Erntearbeiter
Saturday, April 24th, 2004, 05:44 AM
Anglo-Saxons used the word "Hæthen."

Allenson
Sunday, April 25th, 2004, 12:35 PM
Heathen is a purely germanic term. It quite simply has come to mean a person who is not a member of the religions that branched from the cult of Abraham, such as Christianity, Islam and Judaism. In each of these books they look down upon the native peoples and their religions, as needing to be converted or, in case of Islam, destroyed. The Koran literally goes into rants about killing heathens "where ever ye find them." Heathen, the word, is of germanic origin. It refers to the Heath or Heather, a meadow where lowlying shrubs and flowers grow in Europe. A Heathen would be an 'uncivilized' person who would live away from the cities and towns, sticking to the old customs, and not intergrating with the metropolitan, new christian religion of Europe. In about every other Germanic language Heathen is used to describe these people. In german it is "Heide," in swedish it is "Hedning," and so on. They each come from their languages versions of 'heath' (In swedish 'Hedning' comes from 'Hed'), which means there is some 'proto-germanic' connection.
Pagan comes from the latin "Paganus," which means 'country dweller' or 'civilian'. They are used in just about the same way and have similar meanings. Yet one is germanic and the other is italic. Which one should we call ourselves? Well I guess it depends on which meta-ethnicity you want yourself to be associated with. I prefer Heathen.



I personally prefer 'Heathen' due simply to the fact that it is a Germanic word as opposed to the Latin derived 'Pagan'.


Of the heath!! :)

berserkergrrl
Monday, April 26th, 2004, 11:37 PM
To me its one in the same,I am never one to argue semantics :nono I LOVE my heathen :smt008 and am leaning that way myself! :smt003