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Praetorianer
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 01:52 PM
I do want to keep the Pizza shops though. :D


@Mrs. Lyfing: i agree about the pizza shops ;)

No problems with them? (http://forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=862571&postcount=37) :thumbdown

Mrs. Lyfing
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 02:20 PM
No problems with them? (http://forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=862571&postcount=37) :thumbdown

Thanks but I'm still sticking with my first comment. ;)

I am American, we like pizza we don't care :D

But, the fast food joints can fall under the blocks they stand on for all I care. :thumbup

Praetorianer
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 02:31 PM
Thanks but I'm still sticking with my first comment. ;)

I am American, we like pizza we don't care :D

But, the fast food joints can fall under the blocks they stand on for all I care. :thumbup

Sure, do whatever you want, but donīt hope the Italians (or who bakes the pizza for you) will ever leave America with people like you living there and paying money for them.

Psychonaut
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 02:39 PM
Sure, do whatever you want, but donīt hope the Italians (or who bakes the pizza for you) will ever leave America with people like you living there and paying money for them.

Do you really think that we have a whole caste of Italian underlings who slave away baking pizza for us? Who cares what country it originated in; it's delicious! :D

Leonhardt
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 02:55 PM
Many of the pizza joints are not any healthier. Pick your poison.

Got Silicone!
http://www.rense.com/general69/gotpz.htm

There are also nitrates in many of the pizza meats.

Mrs. Lyfing
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 03:02 PM
Sure, do whatever you want, but donīt hope the Italians (or who bakes the pizza for you) will ever leave America with people like you living there and paying money for them.

" People like me " don't be so rude :P

Listen, there is no Italians cooking my Pizza. Its called Domino's they are usually white actually, around here anyways. Ok I'll put it better and more clearer for you, the Domino's I buy pizza from I have only seen white folks. ;)

I'm sure that's up for change if a hard working negro needs a job, but they never hire Mexicans at least ;)

You apparently haven't been to Northern Alabama, as I stated in my first post in this thread, There are no good places to eat at around here its all fast food meaning= there are no chefs cooking our burgers, they are teenagers, blacks and Mexicans cooking our McDonald's burger. :D

And, there darn sure ain't no Italian cooking any Pizza round here neither.

Praetorianer
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 03:14 PM
" People like me " don't be so rude :P

Listen, there is no Italians cooking my Pizza. Its called Domino's they are usually white actually, around here anyways. Ok I'll put it better and more clearer for you, the Domino's I buy pizza from I have only seen white folks. ;)

No changing. The food itself is alien, too.


You apparently haven't been to Northern Alabama, as I stated in my first post in this thread, There are no good places to eat at around here its all fast food meaning= there are no chefs cooking our burgers, they are teenagers, blacks and Mexicans cooking our McDonald's burger.

Iīve really never been there, but itīs new for me that people arenīt able to cook for their own there, but have to be reliant on fast-food.

Thusnelda
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 04:53 PM
I confess that I really love pizzas! Not these fast-food-pizzas, but "real" pizzas from a family-owned pizzeria! I love the salami-pizza over everything! :P *yummy*

Mrs. Lyfing
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 05:26 PM
No changing. The food itself is alien, too.

Maybe so I but I don't find myself so racist that I won't eat a pizza :D




Iīve really never been there, but itīs new for me that people arenīt able to cook for their own there, but have to be reliant on fast-food.


Well that brings to mind American culture I was speaking of earlier. The culture I like to express in my life is that I do know how to cook for my own and very well at that, last night I made the most delicious pot of stew :)

I cook for my family every night. Doesn't mean every now and then I wouldn't like to go to a restaurant and sit down and have someone wait on me. And, the point that goes with that is, I wish there were more mom and pop places to eat at. Feed your locals not your franchises :D;)

Sigurd
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 06:02 PM
I confess that I really love pizzas! Not these fast-food-pizzas, but "real" pizzas from a family-owned pizzeria! I love the salami-pizza over everything! :P *yummy*

In the Southern German areas we're too close to get that chemical stuff anyway, I couldn't think of many proper pizzerias (rather than Turkish take-aways who often do pizzas too) who aren't normal family-owned businesses and proper restaurants. (Here in Scotland it's different, in Aberdeen I can think of less than a handful)

'Fact I've often enough eaten home-made pizza at my parents'. It's a delicious thing, unless it comes from the shelf. :)

Nachtengel
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 06:08 PM
I like to make my own pizza, because I'm very picky with the ingredients. I don't like olives on the pizza for one. It's not hard to make your own pizza. Some markets sell pizza dough for those who aren't patient to make the dough. Then you just put the ingredients you want on it and place it in the oven. Yum yum!

Æmeric
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 07:45 PM
Sure, do whatever you want, but donīt hope the Italians (or who bakes the pizza for you) will ever leave America with people like you living there and paying money for them.

Most people involved with pizza making are not Italian. The founder & CEO of Papa John's (a popular pizzeria chain) is John Schnatter. We don't need Italians to make Italian food for us, just like we don't need Chinese people to staff Chinese restaurants or Thais for Thia restaurants etc... except in the latter-cases there are some people who think it is not authentic if you are not waited on by a member of the appropriate ethnicity.

You should also remember that the tomato is a New World plant. There would be no pizza or any Italian cuisine as we now know it without the tomato. So you might say that pizza is an American food.

Mrs. Lyfing
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 07:49 PM
You should also remember that the tomato is a New World plant. There would be no pizza or any Italian cuisine as we now know it without the tomato. So you might say that pizza is an American food.

:D I knew that why didn't I think of it first awwww shucks ;)

Praetorianer
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 07:57 PM
Most people involved with pizza making are not Italian. The founder & CEO of Papa John's (a popular pizzeria chain) is John Schnatter. We don't need Italians to make Italian food for us, just like we don't need Chinese people to staff Chinese restaurants or Thais for Thia restaurants etc...

I apologize for this mistake, but in Germany you can be sure that China-food is made by Chinese and Pizza made by Italians, kepab made by Turks etc.

Gorm the Old
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 07:58 PM
It has been my experience that the vast majority of pizzerias in the US are run by Greeks. But, whoever makes it, pizza is an AMERICAN dish. The WORD "pizza" comes from the Bay of Naples area, but none of the "pizzas" of that area before the late 1950's bore any resemblance to what we call a pizza, namely, a tomato-and-cheese pie.

By 1954, pizza had begun to become popular in the US, though often called "apizza", "lapizza" or even "lupizza". I was in Italy at the time and sought pizza in Taranto, Genova, Livorno, Firenze, Pisa, and Roma. IT DID NOT EXIST.

Friends of mine who visited Italy later have told me that they did not encounter pizza until after 1960. The only place where I found pizza in southern Europe in 1954 was at a small pizzeria on the Rue Canebiere in
Marseilles, France. This establishment was run by a deportee from Brooklyn, N.Y. :-O

Pizza definitely existed at Lake Parsippany, NJ in 1921. [The mother of a colleague of mine remembered eating it there then as a little girl.] It was called "tomato pie." It is claimed that it was invented by the chef at Tiffany's Restaurant in New York City in 1897 . This has been disputed.

Anyhow, pizza was introduced to Italy and the rest of Europe from the United States in the late 1950's or early 1960's. Most good pizzerias use fresh ingredients in making their pizzas and they are wholesome nourishing [if a tad indigestible] food. :thumbup

Sigurd
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 08:00 PM
You should also remember that the tomato is a New World plant. There would be no pizza or any Italian cuisine as we now know it without the tomato.

There are several excellent Italian dishes which do not require the use of a tomato in the slightest. ;)

Spaghetti Alio e Olio con Frutti di Mare.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/212/514565652_dcb500f501.jpg

Risotto ai Funghi

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/ff/Steinpilzrisotto.jpg

Pasta e fagioli

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/81/Pasta_e_fagioli_rapida.jpg

Spaghetti alla Carbonara

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/93/Spaghetti_alla_Carbonara.jpg

etc. etc. etc.

Æmeric
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 08:03 PM
I apologize for this mistake, but in Germany you can be sure that China-food is made by Chinese and Pizza made by Italians, kepab made by Turks etc.



Pizza has move far beyond being "Italian" food in the US. Most people here think of it as "American". But with other ethnics foods it is usually Chinese serve Chinese food or whatever ethnicity/ethnic food it is. There is a relatively new restaurant chain called Panda Express (http://www.pandaexpress.com/) in the Western US, that is normally managed by Chinese, though not all their workers are Chinese. And then there is the Australian chain of steakhouses called The Outback (http://www.outback.com/), but I have never seen an Australian in any of those.

Sigurd
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 08:04 PM
It has been my experience that the vast majority of pizzerias in the US are run by Greeks. But, whoever makes it, pizza is an AMERICAN dish. The WORD "pizza" comes from the Bay of Naples area, but none of the pizzas of that area before the late 1950's bore any resemblance to what we call a pizza, namely, a tomato-and-cheese pie.

That is incorrect. Americans talk of something substantially different when they speak of Pizza than Europeans do. American pizza is usually baked deep-pan, with a huge amount of dough - whilst European pizza is generally about as thick as a fingernail. In the UK you can get both types, marketted as either "deep pan" or "thin crust" - but at home in Austria, it being so close to Italy I have yet to see a pizzeria that does the American style pizza. ;)

Nachtengel
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 08:16 PM
That is incorrect. Americans talk of something substantially different when they speak of Pizza than Europeans do. American pizza is usually baked deep-pan, with a huge amount of dough - whilst European pizza is generally about as thick as a fingernail. In the UK you can get both types, marketted as either "deep pan" or "thin crust" - but at home in Austria, it being so close to Italy I have yet to see a pizzeria that does the American style pizza. ;)
Yes! The pizza in normal pizzerias here in Europe is thin. But I went to a Pizza Hut sometimes which makes American style pizza, and there they ask you how you like the dough, there is very thick and there is very thin pizza.

Thusnelda
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 08:17 PM
In the Southern German areas we're too close to get that chemical stuff anyway, I couldn't think of many proper pizzerias (rather than Turkish take-aways who often do pizzas too) who aren't normal family-owned businesses and proper restaurants.
We have many pizzerias here who are family-owned, and in some of them you can even watch how they make the fresh pastry of the pizza. :) Stone-Ofen-Pizza is really delicious.
(If you ever are in Obertauern for Skiing you must visit the Pizzeria "Hintertürl" there. They make the best pizza I know and you can watch the whole process of making)

'Fact I've often enough eaten home-made pizza at my parents'. It's a delicious thing, unless it comes from the shelf. :)My family members (and also I) tried to make Pizza often, but honestly I think something is always missing. It tastes good, yes, but there isnīt that specific "Pizza"-flavor you get in a pizzeria. I suppose it has something to do with the pastry? :(
My attempts to make own pizza end up in some kind of "Auflauf mit Pizzaauflage". *g* It tastes unique, but not really like a pizza.

Oswiu
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 08:21 PM
It has been my experience that the vast majority of pizzerias in the US are run by Greeks.
... The WORD "pizza" comes from the Bay of Naples area,
... sought pizza in Taranto, Genova, Livorno, Firenze, Pisa, and Roma. IT DID NOT EXIST. I was under the impression that pizza started out in Magna Graecia, that is, the Greek settled portion of southern Italy. Napoli is obviously a Greek name. Naturally, the Classical form little resembled the one we know today, but I'm not surprised you didn't find anything vaguely similar in the northern parts of Italy.

Do we know of an etymology for the word? Ah, forget it, I'll look myself! :-


pizza
1935, from It. pizza, originally "cake, tart, pie," of uncertain origin. Klein suggests a connection with M.Gk. pitta "cake, pie," from Gk. pitta "pitch." See also pita. Pizzeria is attested from 1943, likely in use in Amer.Eng. from 1930s.
pita
"thick, flat bread," 1951, from Modern Heb. pita or Modern Gk. petta "bread," perhaps from Gk. peptos "cooked," or somehow connected to pizza (q.v.).
I was wondering if there was a connection to the Vulgar (Gallo-)Latin that gave us French derived 'piece', a distant cousin of Welsh 'peth' and possibly the Pictish toponymical element 'pit-'....

Nachtengel
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 08:23 PM
My family members (and also I) tried to make Pizza often, but honestly I think something is always missing. It tastes good, yes, but there isnīt that specific "Pizza"-flavor you get in a pizzeria. I suppose it has something to do with the pastry? :(
My attempts to make own pizza end up in some kind of "Auflauf mit Pizzaauflage". *g* It tastes unique, but not really like a pizza.
I think it's about the ovens they use in pizzerias, which are specially designed for pizza-making, while we cook them in normal home ovens. ;)

P.S. Shouldn't this thread be split into a pizza thread? :D

Aeternitas
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 08:35 PM
Pizza is a pretty universal dish nowadays, one doesn't have to go to Italian- or Middle-Eastern owned restaurants/chains to get it. It can be found in virtually any restaurant, including the more traditional and locally-owned, not to mention most supermarkets. Many regional variations of pizza have been developed, many bearing only a casual resemblance to the Italian original. Pizza ingredients as well as toppings vary tremendously, based on regional tastes, cultural preferences, and local foods. For example, a Swedish Margherita uses Swedish hard cheese instead of mozzarella and dried oregano instead of fresh basil. In the UK, local substitutions range from bacon for prosciutto to cheddar for mozzarella.

American pizza is a variety of its own, which differs in many ways from its Italian cousin. Nowadays pizza has basically become the Americans' unofficial national food, and has many regional variations (e.g. California-style, Chicago-style, Detroit-style, NY-style and so forth). As the dish became increasingly popular in the US, it was changed to fit American tastes. Italian pizza crust is typically thin, while American pizza crusts range from thin to very thick or stuffed crust. American pizza has, unlike Italian pizza, vegetable oil or shortening mixed into the dough. Another key difference lays in the type of sauce used. Americans typically use slow-cooked tomato sauce while Italians use olive oil, pureed fresh tomatoes, garlic, and oregano. A typical Italian pizza has hence a herbier taste than the American one.

Another key difference lays in the variety of toppings, ranging from reindeer in Scandinavia, haggis in the UK or kangaroo, emu or crocodile in Australia. Pizza viennese is made with German sausage as a topping. In Germany, a popular topping is canned tuna with onion. It can stand alone, but it's commonly mixed with vegetables and other toppings (onions, sweet corn). In the Netherlands, the "Double Dutch" is a favorite pizza recipe: double cheese, double onions, and double meat. In Australia, Ham, bacon, and egg pizza is quintessential breakfast fare. Pizzas with seafood such as prawns are also popular. In the US, pepperoni, sausage, mushrooms, onion, green pepper, and extra cheese are the most popular options. There is also a dessert variation served with chocolate and marshmallow in a chocolate shop of Max Brenner in New York City. Garlic fingers is an Atlantic Canadian dish, similar to a pizza in shape and size, and made with similar dough. It is garnished with melted butter, garlic, cheese, and sometimes bacon.

The biggest pizza eaters in the world are, according to a 2004 survery, the Norwegians, who eat 5,4 kg/year per capita. Frozen pizzas such as Grandiosa (https://www.grandiosa.no/) are among the most popular. Norway also has a traditional home-made pizza called "lørdagspizza" (Saturday pizza). The dough is shaped to the pan (usually rectangular), then a mix of minced meat, tomato sauce and gratinated cheese follows.

Anyway, just like in the case of hamburgers, one can find some regional/traditional dishes that are somewhat similar to pizza and could be considered pizza "precursors", like the Zwiebelkuchen, a Southwest German onion cake.

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/67/59/34/675934298af1ab76ad5ed08984ad424c.jpg

It is traditionally made of steamed onions, bacon, cream, and caraway seeds on either a yeast dough or a leavened dough. Other recipes include potatoes, apple slices or even cherries.

Or Flammkuchen, an Alsatian/Palatine/Alemannic German dish, a thin disc of dough covered in crčme fraîche, onions, and lardons.

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/5b/18/ac/5b18ac9ea2ed91205d71a28e0a09d67f.jpg

This was typically a homemade dish which did not make its urban restaurant debut until the "pizza craze" of the 1960s.

The Vikings are said to have cooked flat, round crusts with an array of toppings. See Vikings may have invented the pizza (https://forums.skadi.net/threads/93512-Vikings-May-Have-Invented-the-Pizza).

Mrs. Lyfing
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 09:08 PM
Wait...didn't I bring up Pizza today :D

See there I gave ya'll something fun to do today! :sun

What a wide subject pizza can be. :)

Nachtengel
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 09:16 PM
Yes, like what is your favourite kind of pizza. On mine I like to put ham or salami, tomato sauce, mozzarella, oregano, sweet basil, etc. Some people like pizza with fish like tuna but I don't like it. Maybe because I don't like tuna generally. Yucks.

Edit: Am I seeing 2 x Mrs. Lyfing thanks on Raven's post? How'd you do that? :-O

Ulf
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 09:17 PM
That is incorrect. Americans talk of something substantially different when they speak of Pizza than Europeans do. American pizza is usually baked deep-pan, with a huge amount of dough - whilst European pizza is generally about as thick as a fingernail. In the UK you can get both types, marketted as either "deep pan" or "thin crust" - but at home in Austria, it being so close to Italy I have yet to see a pizzeria that does the American style pizza. ;)

Mainstream fast food pizzas (Dominos, Pizza hut) are usually very thick. Most independent shops have thin neopolitan or thick sicilian style of pizzas. There's also Chicago style which is very thick deep dish pizza or New York style which is the typical thin style. The more common pizza around here is thin and baked in the oven without a pan.

I hate Dominos and Pizza Hut.

Now I'm hungry for pizza.

Patrioten
Tuesday, October 21st, 2008, 10:47 PM
It always makes me smile when supporters of multiculturalism use the pizza as an argument in favor of multiculturalism. "Without the immigrants we wouldn't have pizza". I had never realized that the existence of certain food products could mean difference between the success or downfall of a society. Really, what other arguments do they have in favor of multiculturalism? A freaking pizza baked by a sweaty arab? Do you want a gang-rape with that quattro stagioni, or perhaps an exotic disease?

What do they take us for?

Hersir
Wednesday, October 22nd, 2008, 07:04 AM
Food = culture.
I think its important to support traditional food and dont support foreign shops atleast

Blood_Axis
Wednesday, October 22nd, 2008, 09:07 AM
In Greece, most pizzerias have been owned and run by locals, as well as most of the other 'foreign' cuisine restaurants (french, mexican, indian, fusion, etc, etc)...since greeks love food so much that they have always been wanting variety in their culinary options .. :tongue

I'm not a big fan of pizza but I prefer it over other types of fast food...and honestly, even if pizzerias were run by italians, I would prefer italian immigrants 1000 times over the balkanian, ex-USSR, and non-european lot we got here :D

CrystalRose
Wednesday, October 22nd, 2008, 12:27 PM
Was that the doorbell? Pizzas here! :)

Oswiu
Wednesday, October 22nd, 2008, 12:40 PM
Anyone who for any reason has to spend any time in and around Mytischi in Moskovskaya Oblast' should seriously consider phoning 516 2457 Pitstsa Fyeniks and ordering the fishy one they make. It's probably horrendous for your health, and would horrify even afficionados of the Americanised pizza, never mind Italian purists from Campania, but it fills a hole, and if I remember the number after so many years it can't be that bad. ;)

Siebenbürgerin
Wednesday, October 22nd, 2008, 01:11 PM
Here in Transylvania traditional pizzerias or restaurants are owned by Italian families and they have Italian names and a Italian flag on the entrance. Who wants high quality pizza looks for these symbols because they know the pizzeria is Italian. They offer so many types of pizzas your mouth waters just looking at the menu. :P I tried some peculiar type of pizzas like "Pizza Dracula", a very piquant pizza with chili, garlic and some kind of piquant salami. It leaves you with a very hot taste in the mouth, it's not for the faint of heart. ;) I don't mind eating at the pizzeria once in a while. It's one of the few quality places to eat out besides the German and Hungarian places. I rather give my money to Italians than to Chinese. I make pizza at home too but just like Valkyrie, it doesn't come out as a real pizza like in the pizzeria. We make Zwiebelkuchen too and it's delicious.

SwordOfTheVistula
Thursday, October 23rd, 2008, 11:25 AM
To be properly Germanic one must consume :D:

http://www.endymion.org/Portals/152/Red%20Baron%20Logo%20small.jpg



That is incorrect. Americans talk of something substantially different when they speak of Pizza than Europeans do. American pizza is usually baked deep-pan, with a huge amount of dough - whilst European pizza is generally about as thick as a fingernail. In the UK you can get both types, marketted as either "deep pan" or "thin crust" - but at home in Austria, it being so close to Italy I have yet to see a pizzeria that does the American style pizza. ;)

Yeah, we have the 'thin crust' here as well, most places offer "deep pan" or "thin crust", also some that have cheese embedded in the crust which I absolutely love.

I love pepperoni, or any other type of meat aside from ham (ick!), olives (green olives rule!), mushrooms, and as much cheese as possible :)

Gorm the Old
Friday, October 24th, 2008, 02:37 AM
I couldn't get ashore at Naples [I was in the Navy. The ship was there for repairs.] But Taranto is as far south as you can get in Italy and there was no pizza there in 1954, nor was there in Palermo, Sicily.

Cassell's Italian Dictionary, Edition of 1958, new material added as late as 1967, defines pizza as a " Neapolitan savoury bun. " BUN ?, well, THAT is about as far from a tomato pie as one can get, isn't it ? I repeat: WHAT THE WORLD NOW KNOWS AS PIZZA DID NOT EXIST IN ITALY UNTIL IT WAS IMPORTED FROM THE UNITED STATES IN THE LATE 1950's OR early 1960's.

I do not deny that it was probably invented by an Italian immigrant, or the descendent of one. He probably lived in the NY-NJ area and probably invented it in the late 19th or early 20th century.

Since then, it has evolved into thin-crust, thick-crust, deep-dish, shallow-dish, red (with tomato), white (without [!] tomato) and sundry other varieties, some, IMHO, ghastly. However, unless one can justify speaking of "Hungarianised" goulash, there is no such thing as "Americanised" pizza !

Gorm the Old
Friday, October 24th, 2008, 03:25 AM
@Valkyrie

IMO, it comes from oregano (wild marjoram). It certainly must be incorporated into the sauce and may also be present in the crust.

CrystalRose
Friday, October 24th, 2008, 07:44 AM
Does anyone like pesto, garlic or feta cheese on their pizza? I usually like thin/medium crust, eventually i'll get a deep dish pan and experiment. If you're pressed for time french bread or a sour dough loaf makes a great pizza crust as well. Gorm, wherever it originated from, I love the stuff regardless.:)

SpearBrave
Wednesday, November 18th, 2009, 09:51 PM
For Valkyrie, Siebenburgerin, and Todesengle:

My woman/girlfriend/soon to be wife/kitchen ruler makes me pizza from time to time we both like thin crispy pizza. Here is how she does it and it taste just like from a pizzeria.

Try putting a layer of clay tiles on your oven rack and baking the pizza @ 425 degrees F( convert to metric). Also place a small pan about 10cm wide filled with water in the oven it will make the crust crispy. Place the pizza on the clay tiles without a pan.

For spices she uses small amounts of crushed anise, basil,
rosemary,garlic,and a very small amount of natural sugar. She also adds olive oil to the dough and sauce. I think she spent about 2-3 years experimenting to get it right. That is all the info I could drag out of her as she is very proud of her cooking skills and likes to keep things secret.:)

jacktheknife
Thursday, November 19th, 2009, 06:20 AM
Re: homemade pizza

Pizza Dough,

High glutin flour is $12.00 a 50 Lb sack,
from Roma wholesale restaurant supply.
{used to be $8.50, 20 years ago.}
Glutin used to be in all flour,
in fact my Dad made kites when he was a kid from newspaper and sticks
with glue made from flour and water.
But flour now has all the glutin removed.
Dad made a kite for me like that when I was a kid but it wouldn't stick.
'Glutin' made the dough chewy and tough.

For an average size pizza for one person,
{ie. 10".}
Half cup water in dough bowl.
Just hydrate yeast, let it sit on top of the water 15'.
Then corn oil or olive oil if you can afford it.
A good bit of oil {I don't measure it} say two tablespoons.
Salt, sugar, and stir in flour till the dough is still wet and sticky,
{and not dried out,} as it will rise 3-4 hours.
Kneed the dough for 10 minutes by the timer,
cover with towel and shake the dough till it rolls around in the bowl every hour.
Keep covered with two doubled over towls.

When your ready to eat,
ie. drunk enough and starving turn on the oven.
When the oven is at about 480-490,
pick up dough and let gravity pull the dough down as you turn it.
Lay dough down on well oiled pan and roll it out with a clean beer bottle, I prefer green glass.
Take the pizza and fold it over and over again till it is 3/4 of a circle.
Corn meal all under it and on the peal too, everywhere.
Transfer, open and build the pizza on the wooden peal.
Sauce, cheese, veggies and spices.
Transfer to the pizza stone with the peal and set the timer
for 17-18 minutes.

One big clove of garlic,
slice and fork it all up and spread on crust.
{some times I use olive oil and make a garlic pesto}
Then sauce, I like hunts tomato sauce in a can.
Then cheese,
lots and I prefer Mexican mozzerella
and a little chedder.
Then vegetables,
Then spices,
{oregano, salt, red pepper,}

17-18'- at 490-500 degrees, on 'top' oven rack.
While the chef, you, drinks a couple of more brewski's.
Let pizza sit for a few minutes so when cut the cheese stays on the pizza.
Serve with Parmesian cheese,
{as expensive of a parmesian as you can find}
pepperocini's, and Alpino spicy pizza topping,
{on the side}
Highly recommended!

http://www.puckeredpickle.com/ap_retail.htm

Eat pizza.


Pizza

Thank you

J. Winters von Knife
http://jacksknifeshop.tripod.com/

Bittereinder
Saturday, January 12th, 2019, 04:05 PM
From an authentic wop for the aficionados:

xA-mwJcNBzA&t

9Ikknmv3DYg

s4lL5I-UYbk

zVqvDKBD3Go

_Rg2LmveA8E

The dough takes a day or two to make, it makes about 10 bases!

Best Pizza I have had/baked, ever.

Fire spirit
Sunday, January 13th, 2019, 12:18 AM
Tasty looking pizza

114214

SpearBrave
Sunday, January 13th, 2019, 01:27 AM
Tasty looking pizza

114214

That may be pizza, but this is Pizza with a capital P. ;)

This is Chicago style Pizza in Chicago, and so far the best in the world that I have had.

Volk und Rasse
Sunday, January 13th, 2019, 08:17 AM
I'm one of the few people that love my pizza with pineapples. :P

http://bakingglory.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/grilled.pineapple-900x600.jpg