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Jute
Saturday, August 2nd, 2008, 11:20 PM
Could be an English family, Watson is not a Guernsey name. I don't like the English being over there in such numbers.What does that mean? You want it to be given to France? :confused:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4b/Uk_map_guernsey.png/250px-Uk_map_guernsey.png

OneEnglishNorman
Sunday, August 3rd, 2008, 01:19 AM
What does that mean? You want it to be given to France? :confused:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4b/Uk_map_guernsey.png/250px-Uk_map_guernsey.png

There was always a trickle of British moving to the Channel Islands, this increased greatly with the British Empire and into the 20th Century. Now on Jersey for example there are as many British descended people as Jersey (Norman) people. So it's not different any more and becomes a pocket of English people, like a lot of places in Wales. Of course now the street markets are full of Slavic tongues too from Polish/Czech/etc workers.

Drekinn
Tuesday, September 9th, 2008, 01:21 PM
Guernsey is a Norman island and is not England. There are frankly to many English people living in the Norman Isles...to many. They are destroying the Norman culture. I can┤t understand why they move to other nations in such numbers, the English, and talk about immigration problems at home. If they love their country so much why do they leave? At least they should respect the Norman culture they are moving into and speak Norman and not English.

They would all complane if other people whould not speak Englsh in England.

I spoke Icelandic in England to an Icelandic friend of mine living in London and got screamed at for doing so. And English is just a hybrid Anglo-Saxon-Jutish-Norman-French-Latin etc etc mongrel of a language, unlike Icelandic.

But basicaly the Normans in the Norman channel isles should stop this English massive immigration and even deport some of the English out.
It is a shame that the masters (the Normans) are now letting hordes of English (Serfs) into their last Norman-ruled part of the once powerfull Norman Duchy, mainland Normandy being now ruled from Paris.

To call Norman isles England is insane and very disturbing.

I personaly refuse as many Icelanders now to talk to English people in English in Iceland.

If they can┤t respect our nordic language they can stay were they are and the same goes to these hordes of English inferior elements mixing now with the noble Norman blood in the Channel Isles and mainland Normandy.

Aldrei a­ sŠtta sig vi­ enska skrÝlinn. ╔g bara ver­ a­ koma me­ smß refsiv÷nd ß ykkur fyrir ■essa bjßnalegu yfirbur­artakta ykkar og fordˇma.

Njˇti­ vel.

Rhydderch
Wednesday, September 10th, 2008, 12:30 PM
It is a shame that the masters (the Normans) are now letting hordes of English (Serfs) into their last Norman-ruled part of the once powerfull Norman Duchy, mainland Normandy being now ruled from Paris.Isn't it more a case of "Noble Normans" having ruled both England and the Channel Islands? The Channel Islanders are probably no more "Noble Norman" than the English, and no less Serfs.


I personaly refuse as many Icelanders now to talk to English people in English in Iceland.After all, English is now a worldwide lingua franca; you'll find that occuring all over the world, non-native speakers of English speaking to native Anglophones in English; don't be so surprised or annoyed :)

The "Noble English" have been a powerful people, you know. Their rule and influence has spread far and wide ;)

Drekinn
Wednesday, September 10th, 2008, 07:59 PM
That should be the true question.

OneEnglishNorman
Wednesday, September 10th, 2008, 08:59 PM
England is English, IMHO the population elements were set in place after the Flemish settled.

Also the English should not be given a hard time for re-locating to Scottish islands, Wales, or the Channel Islands. If the country were not so disjointed and badly governed, (middle class) English (from the South East) would not move about like that to quite the same degree.

BeornWulfWer
Wednesday, September 10th, 2008, 09:25 PM
Guernsey is a Norman island and is not England.

Having lived there for for four years, I can safely say that they hold on to their identity of being a Guernsey man, but are vehemently proud to be considered English.

The same, I presume, goes for the Jersey lot.



I can┤t understand why they move to other nations in such numbers, the English, and talk about immigration problems at home.

The English that move out of the British Isles are not the best examples of English, anyway.
If they decide to move abroad, then the ones who do stay are the ones you should be seriously listening to in concerns to immigration gripes.

Besides, the Channel Islands is still 30 years behind the mainland, still adamant in holding onto its immigration numbers, very strict in retaining its laws and heritage.

Plus we aren't brown or yellow! :D



At least they should respect the Norman culture they are moving into and speak Norman and not English.

:scratch Have you ever been to Guernsey or the Channel Islands? The last time I went, they were speaking English. You did have a few locals who stuck to their local patois, but they were mostly French loving yokels. :D



I spoke Icelandic in England to an Icelandic friend of mine living in London and got screamed at for doing so.

....And too right you should have been!

If I'm on a bus and their is some people speaking a language other then English, I tell them to speak English or be quiet.

You get strange looks, but some one has to stand up for my country.


But basicaly the Normans in the Norman channel isles should stop this English massive immigration and even deport some of the English out.

Sounds good if it was as bad as you made it out, but let's say that occurs. Who's going to work the bars? Work the tables? Build the houses and the offices? Who's going to support the local market?

It sure ain't the locals as they are gone as soon as the age of consent allows them.


It is a shame that the masters (the Normans) are now letting hordes of English (Serfs) into their last Norman-ruled part of the once powerfull Norman Duchy, mainland Normandy being now ruled from Paris.

I'm sorry. I would fail to see the setback if this was occurring.

You mean to say you would feel sorry that the Saxons were invading Norman territory? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Hastings)



I personaly refuse as many Icelanders now to talk to English people in English in Iceland.

:thumbup Well done! Someone has to make a stand and if the visitors won't make the effort to speak the local lingo; sod em!



...and the same goes to these hordes of English inferior elements mixing now with the noble Norman blood in the Channel Isles and mainland Normandy.

I would heavily suggest you take a trip to the Channel Islands before you attempt to impart some knowledge on the matter.

The next Island Games in ┼land, 2009, should give you an idea of the local population.

Vingolf
Wednesday, September 10th, 2008, 11:01 PM
Hmm... Guernsey is derived form norman Green(s)ey (Green island), but what about Jersey?

According to one of the theories, Jersey is derived from Norse Geirsey, i.e. Geirs island.