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Ulf
Tuesday, September 2nd, 2008, 12:05 AM
In the past many superstitious Pennsylvania Germans believed in Pow-wow practices and in the "hex." Almost every community had a "hex" doctor or pow-wow man who possessed special knowledge and magical power. Three books had a great influence on these superstitious people, one titled, Egyptian Secrets or White and Black Art for Man and Beast by Albertus Magnus is a centuries old source of suggested techniques for cures of sickness, obtaining holding powers over other people and other mehods of gaining objectives by unique practices. 6th and 7th Books of Moses or Moses' Magical Spirit-Art, was another popular source of superstitious practice which offered magicar markThe s, seals, amulets and symbols. In 1819, John G. Hohman published a booklet in Berks County titled, "Long Lost Friend or Pow-Wows" in which the author promised:

"I, Hohman, hereby swear and attest that whosoever shall use my secrets shall be safe from all his enemies, visible and invisible and whosoever shall follow the secrets revealed in my book and apply them should surely be able to obtain success, good fortune, and prosperity.' The author further assured the reader that "whosoever carries the book with him would be protected from drowning, burning, and would avoid any unjust sentence passed upon him."

Continued at:Pow-Wow (http://www.horseshoe.cc/pennadutch/culture/customs/powwow.htm)


If you would thrive, Be up 'by five;
For there is health, and certain wealth
When at the plough, Or milking a cow.
Is to be seen but seldom heard.

A smoky chimney may be cured,
A scolding woman not endured;
A farmer's wife, like cream or curd,

Pork and beans make muscles strong
Something farmers seek;
It is a dish to make life long,
When cooked but once a week.

Of all the crops a farmer raises,
Or capital employes,
None can bring back such comforts and praises,
As a crop of girls and boys.

Soten
Tuesday, September 2nd, 2008, 06:06 AM
Good to see someone else who is Pennsylvania Dutch on board (I have a number of PA Dutch ancestors.)

Speaking of hexes, have you ever heard of the York County Hexenmeister named Rehmeyer and his supposedly haunted house. I went there this summer and it was pretty spooky. Here's the story...

http://www.rehmeyershollow.com/?TabId=57

Ok, the link's not working...just go to rehmeyershollow.com

Kriegersohn
Tuesday, September 2nd, 2008, 08:09 PM
I'll need to look for it but there is an audio interview with a lady and she talks about pow-wowing when she was a child (I think the interview was in the late 60's or so)...a bit hard to understand in certain places because she is speaking in dialect. If I can find it I'll post it here. :)

Soten
Wednesday, September 3rd, 2008, 12:20 AM
I'll need to look for it but there is an audio interview with a lady and she talks about pow-wowing when she was a child (I think the interview was in the late 60's or so)...a bit hard to understand in certain places because she is speaking in dialect. If I can find it I'll post it here. :)

So long as she's speaking mostly in English with just a PA Dutch quirk to it anyone from the PA Dutch area will probably be able to understand it.

Kriegersohn
Wednesday, September 3rd, 2008, 06:50 PM
So long as she's speaking mostly in English with just a PA Dutch quirk to it anyone from the PA Dutch area will probably be able to understand it.

I was able to locate a different one that was from 1984, the text of what she's saying is in English and the audio, which you can click on, is in actual PA Dutch. There are a couple of other short interviews as well. While extremely short it is in the same vein as the longer interview that I mentioned. The link is here:

American Languages: Our Nation's Many Voices Online (http://csumc.wisc.edu/AmericanLanguages/search_clip_type.php?clip_type=PennDutch )

Hauke Haien
Wednesday, September 3rd, 2008, 07:20 PM
The first sound file is great, but the rest is so heavily polluted with English vocabulary and related defects in pronunciation that it incurs displeasure and it is a stark reminder of the need to stop standard German from becoming the same.

It is quite ironic, though, that a Non-Amish/Non-Mennonite was so much more successful at preserving and developing her linguistic heritage than supposedly self-contained sects in the same area.