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Blutwölfin
Tuesday, October 4th, 2005, 08:26 PM
The Mayan Calendar ends on December 21, 2012 - is this the end of the world? :D
Check out this (http://www.survive2012.com/).

PsycholgclMishap
Tuesday, October 4th, 2005, 08:44 PM
The Mayan Calendar ends on December 21, 2012 - is this the end of the world? :D
Check out this (http://www.survive2012.com/).
The Aztec, Sumerian and other calendars end on or near that date as well.

I have read a lot on the history of this theory and theories quite similar.

Testament even wrote a song about the event, "3 Days of Darkness".

Supposedly those dates are December 21, 22 and 23, 2012.

We'll see, won't we?! :)

Loki
Tuesday, October 4th, 2005, 08:57 PM
is this the end of the world? :D
Check out this (http://www.survive2012.com/).

I hope so. :) The future, if the world will continue, will be too miserable to experience. It will be hell. So, rather us all be gone... :coffee:

Blood_Axis
Wednesday, October 5th, 2005, 12:24 AM
Interesting.

Some newest commercial Greek urban legends (tele-evangelist alien related neo-hippy bullshit) forsee the coming of the "great ones" in 2012 as well. I bet the date was not chosen at random. ;)

hauer
Wednesday, October 5th, 2005, 12:40 AM
Another doomsday prophecy... don't quit your day job folks. I can help you with that beer...

Haldís
Wednesday, October 5th, 2005, 01:53 AM
The Mayan Calendar ends on December 21, 2012 - is this the end of the world? :D
Check out this (http://www.survive2012.com/).
The world won't end, and my future will be bright. By yule 2012 I will run TNP because Loki will be drunk, and then you will be banned. :P

Seriously, the world won't end but it's very interesting. The Maya Calendar is a heathen calendar, they were skywatchters. The date (or time frame) is also important for us. All Heathen systems come to the same result because there is only one Nature. :)

December 21, 2012 (13.0.0.0.0 in the Maya Long Count) is an extremely close conjunction of the winter solstice sun with the crossing point of galactic equator and the ecliptic, what the ancient Maya recognized as the Sacred Tree. Their mythology but common astronomy.

This rarely happens and occurs because of precession, the slow wobbling of the earth's polar axis. Precession is a very slow process, and almost identic alignments can be seen on the winter solstice dates within a few years on either side of 2012. Says the year is arbitrary or unprecise, but let's look at the time frame, let's say 25 years up and down in both directions.

In our system, this time where the Maya 13-baktun cycle ends (it's roughly 1/5th of a precessional cycle)... I must interrupt here, do you understand? The cycle ends, it's a cycle, a circle, it's Heathen stuff, there is no end in the Christian sense, there is coming and going, birth, death, and rebirth... no judgment day, no end of the world... ok, when this ends, in our system, the age of Pisces ends and the age of Aquarius begins.

If Pisces is a sign of water, Aquarius is much more so : for us that symbolizes absorption (dissolution) back into the original atom from where the cycle had started. Back to the gods is unity with the gods. We will deify ourselves and that implies the purification at the energetic level. At the material level, this purification will make the enlightenment possible, that's why we call it the Age of Truth.

It will be wonderful and fantastic, trust me for once. :)

Ewergrin
Wednesday, October 5th, 2005, 02:18 AM
Interesting.

Some newest commercial Greek urban legends (tele-evangelist alien related neo-hippy bullshit) forsee the coming of the "great ones" in 2012 as well. I bet the date was not chosen at random. ;)
Yes, but where does the leading evangelical, end-of-the-world, arrmageddon is here prophet, Nostradamus, weigh in on the issue? :doh :rolleyes: :oldman

SouthernBoy
Wednesday, October 5th, 2005, 03:51 AM
It will be hell. So, rather us all be gone... :coffee:

"Here we may reign secure; and in my choice
To reign is worth ambition, though in hell:
Better to reign in hell than serve in heaven."

Are you familiar with "Paradise Lost", Loki? ;)

PsycholgclMishap
Wednesday, October 5th, 2005, 05:29 PM
Yes, but where does the leading evangelical, end-of-the-world, arrmageddon is here prophet, Nostradamus, weigh in on the issue? :doh :rolleyes: :oldman
Haha. Nice smiley sequence.

"Nostradamus predicts the end of the world since he wrote in the preface that his predictions would last to 3797"...not sure how accurate that statement is...

Sigurd
Saturday, October 8th, 2005, 09:03 PM
All end of the world theories, IMO are pretty much bullshit. Although I am waiting for the one that I don't find bullshit. Ragnarök will come, someday. Most likely not in our lifetimes, though, so why worry about things that will never happen while we live.

Sifsvina
Tuesday, October 11th, 2005, 10:42 AM
Ragnarök will come, someday. Most likely not in our lifetimes, though, so why worry about things that will never happen while we live.

It is not about worrying, it is about preparing. For me the act of preparing increases the quality of my life (knowing how to make things from scratch, being able to let go etc.) so even if it does not happen in my life I have made my life and the life of those around me "better" for the time we are here. I believe the quality of knowing how to do many things, how to survive without modern conveniences, learning how our ancestors lived and how they dealt with the upheavals and end of life is essential. To live one's life to the fullest, to face life and inevitable death with honor and passion and ability is the goal. Each of us may die tomorrow, the world may end tomorrow, this is nothing to panic about, just a fact of existence. JERA

Sigurd
Tuesday, October 11th, 2005, 01:16 PM
Hmmm....before we can prepare for Ragnarök, though, we need to sort out inter-Heathen differences...:( Of course each one will organise for themselves, but in the end it will all be a chaotic piece if we dont ALL work together in some way.

Guess you don't get what I'm hinting at, though...;)

Ethelwulf
Wednesday, October 12th, 2005, 06:11 AM
Those calendars just spell the doom of those people, and not us.

Anyway, you raise a good point. Life is fragile. And currently the biggest threats to us (besides "multi-culturalism" and things like that), are meteors, asteroids, super-volcanic explosions, irreversible green house effect (in which case Earth would go the way of Venus), and others, but these are the main ones which we have to worry about currently. I believe there is another asteroid coming close to us in about 45-50 years that could threaten us.

So it does become a race towards preservation, and it is a case of quality over quantity. 8 billion people are not vital to mankind, not even 1 billion is. Yet that is present day morality for you (particularly the colour blind (aka delusional) kind). The earth is very volatile, if it wasn't, we wouldnt be alive. But it also means we have to adapt well. The continents move, things change, but we are intelligent enough to where we can, if we don't get trapped into caring for these non-whites who do not care for us, preserve our race, and even leave the planet. Most likely, when off earth, we'd be living in a large space station, and bubble colonies on places like the moon and mars. the gravity on the moon is i think about 1/8th that of earth, and thusly it is basically impossible for the moon to retain an atmosphere as earth does. therefore, making it into an earth would be hard to do.

Europa is in a very good stage for formative life, and shows sign of being good for advanced life. It is reminiscent of Earth earlier on, it is close enough to Jupiter to experience enough gravity and action to stay active, yet not that close to where it is in a constant state of turmoil such as Io. Could it be our second Europe?

It is certainly possible for our race to live forever. However, it starts with keeping our homelands pure, our gene pools pure, and to go forward into the night while taking the past with us. Honouring our fathers we honour ourselves.

Ethelwulf
Wednesday, October 12th, 2005, 06:20 AM
All end of the world theories, IMO are pretty much bullshit. Although I am waiting for the one that I don't find bullshit. Ragnarök will come, someday. Most likely not in our lifetimes, though, so why worry about things that will never happen while we live.

What of our children, of our race?

Sigurd
Wednesday, October 12th, 2005, 01:48 PM
Our people will face it one day. But only if we help to preserve the fact of there actually being something that is called our people ;)

But we should not worry about Ragnarök right now. As emphasized, before we can prepare for it, we will have to "unite" all Northern kind. :viking1

Siegfried
Wednesday, October 12th, 2005, 01:53 PM
Actually, 2012 is the date a racialist Imperium Europa will be founded. Thus spake Lowell! (http://www.imperium-europa.org/the_idea/home.asp) ;)

Sigurd
Wednesday, October 12th, 2005, 02:02 PM
So you mean it will be their end, and that is why their calendar stops ;) ???

Mistress Klaus
Friday, October 21st, 2005, 03:33 PM
:P This reminds me of a thread I posted one time on Skadi (I think?),,,about the world ending...or more so, dramatically changing at the end of 2011.


Back in 1971...2 men apparently had an encounter by UFO's in the Arizona desert. One of the men was hypotised later by investigators and revealed that they were abducted and was told by an intelligent being that


"All men will know the truth..None is to fear. The world is not known to all. No further away than time. When I return, all will know the truth. Life will be lived through all time and knowledge will all be yours. I shall return to you and all mankind, You will see your world, my world and the joy of all life to come...not measured by time of man, only as light reflects light, time reflects time, and a mirror reflects what you see now. To cell from body. To you. I am now, I was and will always be"


In later hypnosis it was revealed: "the complete annihilation of the Western hemisphere from an easterly direction involving bombs of high magnitude"... From this disaster only a few thousand persons would be rescued and taken to another plane of existence. All this was due to occur on the 24 December 2011.


:D Don't know what to think about these statements...Seems spookily plausible...

Ewergrin
Friday, October 21st, 2005, 04:57 PM
:D Don't know what to think about these statements...Seems spookily plausible...
Spookily plausible end-of-the-world-predicitons by a guy who claims to have been abducted by aliens? :runaway :doh

Anyone could make that predicition. Americans have had a fear of that since the Cold War.

Weg
Saturday, October 22nd, 2005, 01:49 AM
It means we all have to spend less time on the net. ;) Hurry up to live your life!

PS : The end of the world was expected to occur in 1000. We're still waiting...

Blake Haydn
Friday, October 28th, 2005, 08:27 PM
I don't think we need to go by these blurry predictions on when the world is supposed to end. But I do think we can look at current events and see the dangers that have been lurking on the planet since the end of WW2.

Blutwölfin
Monday, January 1st, 2007, 03:56 PM
December 21, 2012 the world will change forever as major Governments are forced to confess the existence of advanced extraterrestrial UFOs

The Maya prediction of a cataclysmic end to the world as we know it is near. Secret preparations are being made in many countries for the Governments to come out clean what they have been hiding for decades – the existence of unexplained advanced extraterrestrial UFOs.

Brazil, India and China are taking the lead in this matter. They want to make sure the emerging new world understands that we have to coexist with our advanced extraterrestrial neighbors.

Negotiations are on with future manned travel to Moon, Mars and so on. There was a reason why Russia and America stopped lunar missions. There was reason why no one dared to travel to Mars on manned mission. There are reasons why the pictures from Apollo mission in Moon look fictitious. Apollo mission was real but it was an eye opener to the space agencies. The extraterrestrials were already in Moon to greet us.

In December 21, 2012 something will change. The world will secretly use the help of the extraterrestrials to avert massive disaster for out civilization. The major Governments may not be able to keep the facts the under the rug any more. The catastrophic events in 2007-12 will manifest if the Mayan prophecy will come true.



Source (http://www.indiadaily.com/editorial/14929.asp)

Nachtengel
Wednesday, August 20th, 2008, 12:53 PM
Do you think apocalypse is coming in 2012? According to the Mayan calendar it is.


The fate of humanity, the Earth and the London Olympics is seriously in question as 2012 marks the termination of the 13th b'ak'tun cycle, and possibly the end of the world. Again.

As you no doubt know, a b'ak'tun is a 144,000-day period of the ancient Maya long count calendar, just under 400 years. What catastrophe this termination event may incur is yet unclear. Predictions by Mayan conspiracy theorists such as Patrick Geryl, range from the destruction of the Earth, possibly by a comet, the death of humankind, a reversal of the world order or simply a switch of the Earth's magnetic poles, and whatever natural disasters that ensue.

skyhawk
Wednesday, August 20th, 2008, 05:35 PM
These doomsday predictions have been with humankind probably as long as we have been around ourselves.

I wouldn't like to put a definate date to anything myself but I do believe that the threat of human annihilation is very real in the nuclear age and that even if we manage to behave/civilize ourselves our rapacious activities are likely to lead to annihilation by enviornmental destruction at some point anyway.

Nothing is forever , humanity will be no exception but we do have a say in whether that end comes sooner or later which is more than can be said for every other form of life on earth.

Plushtar
Wednesday, August 20th, 2008, 05:37 PM
I don't buy into the world ending anytime soon. I see it as a byproduct of what Christianity has done not only to the Germanic folk, but to all folks of the world. For nearly 2000 years the little Jew with an identity crisis has been coming back tommorow, yet never arrives.

Despite not being a Christian or Muslim, I don believe in their Anti-Christ; this thing is just like the Frankenstein monster having a child with the boy who cried wolf. This thing will come and destroy both of them and anyone who fell for this nonsense. The rest of us (the organic theists and atheists) will survive and repopulate the world without them. As for the Mayans, this calendar only shows that they were greatly skilled in mathematics, since it points to the exact moment when the sun will align with the core of the galaxy, nothing else.

My advice is to just live your lives like you normally do.

Oswiu
Wednesday, August 20th, 2008, 07:55 PM
Before or after the Olympics? Can we be saved the embarrassment of our guaranteed rubbish event and be annihilated before, please?

aquitanos
Wednesday, August 20th, 2008, 08:12 PM
Before or after the Olympics? Can we be saved the embarrassment of our guaranteed rubbish event and be annihilated before, please?

Its supposed to be 21 December 2012


Personally I have somewhat 'followed' this 2012 thing since I was younger (thanks to some sort of documentary that scared me when I was about 10). In said documentary though it was said that our electronics would go haywire (another 2000 scare?) and that our animals would start talking to us. :rolleyes:

Anywho, I never believed it was going to be an end-all/apocalyptic situation for us, but I have always believed something would happen. Whether or not it would actually be noticeable to us, or even affect us is a different story. I will say that if nothing noticeable happens in 2012, I will NEVER believe in/give any thought to any more theories similar ever again. (this would be a good thing.)

Along with the next polar shift, another popular theory includes that 'time' is no longer supposed to be linear...

Cythraul
Wednesday, August 20th, 2008, 08:20 PM
I've thought about raising this topic on the Althing a number of times. So thank you Todesengel for doing so. I've studied the subject of cyclical and lost civilisations much over the last few years. It's one of my favourite topics. The monuments at Giza, and the temples at Angkor in Cambodia point to the date of 10,500 BC* and seem to be withholding some kind of esoteric astrological and geometrical wisdom. What was so important about this date? Did a great cataclysm consume advanced societies (ones who had been able to map the entire world, even the land beneath the Antarctic ice)?

2012 marks the end of an aeon for the Mayans. Civilisation, as far as they were concerned, had risen and fallen a number of times previously. I don't know what's going to happen in 2012 (incidentally Oswiu, the significant date is the Winter Solstice on 21st December - so the Olympics will be just fine :rolleyes:) but I certainly won't be betting against some kind of grand event.

The difference between 10,500 BC and 2012 AD is 12,512 years. A precessional cycle (the time it takes for the Earth's axis to wobble one full circle, like a spinning top) is roughly 26,000 years. 12,512 years is close enough to half that length of time to be significant. 2012 marks the opposite precessional extremity to that which occured in 10,500 BC when there is evidence of a great cataclysm occuring.

Loddfafner
Wednesday, August 20th, 2008, 08:43 PM
Why should Mayan cosmology be any more accurate than those of Middle Easterners, Greeks, Yorubas, or even Vikings?

skyhawk
Thursday, August 21st, 2008, 06:20 PM
I remember watching a documentary about the Spanish conquest of the Latin American continent. According to the makers of it the Spanish learned of the doomsday prophecies of the indigenous peoples and actually used them to their advantage. Choosing to launch attacks on dates that held significance to the Mayans and others thus compounding their sense of impending doom and making the task of conquest that much easier.

So it is not beyond the realms of possibility for modern day imperial planners to use to their advantage dates linked to doomsday prophecies in order to add a sense of inevitability to proceedings . Maybe that's something people might like to think about too when they have an interest in such subjects.

In my opinion the now is what we fight to make it and not some predetermined path of human fate we simply observe as passive viewers unable to set a different course for ourselves.

Cuchulain
Thursday, August 21st, 2008, 06:44 PM
Why should Mayan cosmology be any more accurate than those of Middle Easterners, Greeks, Yorubas, or even Vikings?

Their calendar was more accurate than the one we use today.

Lyfing
Thursday, August 21st, 2008, 11:10 PM
The difference between 10,500 BC and 2012 AD is 12,512 years. A precessional cycle (the time it takes for the Earth's axis to wobble one full circle, like a spinning top) is roughly 26,000 years. 12,512 years is close enough to half that length of time to be significant. 2012 marks the opposite precessional extremity to that which occured in 10,500 BC when there is evidence of a great cataclysm occuring.

Yeah, Joseph Campbell talked about that a lot in Oriental Mythology particularly in the chapter called Mythic Time pages 115-121. I ain't going to type it up but the following is kind of what he was talking about...


Mesopotamian Numerology
Sumerian, Babylonian, et al

decimal (base 10) & sexigesimal (base 60)

60 seconds = 1 minute
60 minutes = 1 degree
360 degrees = 1 circle

60 seconds = 1 minute
60 minutes = 1 hour

- time and space are in numerical accord.
- numerology was associated with the cosmic order

Babylonian Harmonic Number 12, 960, 000 = 60 x 60 x 60 x 60
see Mayan Harmonic Number 13 66 560

60 (soss)
600 (ner)
3 600 (ser)
216 000 (great sar) = 60 x 3 600

2 x great sar = 432 000

Precession of the Equinoxes

1 degree every 72 years
= 30 per 2, 160 years
= 360 per 25, 920 years

25, 920 / 60 = 432

Mesopotamian year = 360 days + 5 days = 72 x 5-day weeks + 5 days

as day : year
so year : great year

360 x 72 = 25, 920 calendar days in 72 years
72 years = 1 degree precessed by equinoxes

In 72 years, the Mesopotamians measured:

1 degree change in the Precession of Equinoxes
25, 920 calendar days
x 360 = 25, 920 years, the complete Precession

Babylonian & Biblical Numerological comparison

According to Berossos, a Babylonian scholar, a particular arrangement of 10 antediluvian kings (as listed previously on Babylonian tablets under different names and times), and the duration of their reigns, totalling 432, 000 years.

In Genesis 5 (King James), the 10 Patriarchs from Adam to Noah at the Flood lasted 1, 656 years.

432, 000 / 72 = 6, 000
432, 000 = 86, 400 x 5-day weeks
vs
1, 656 / 72 = 8, 400
8, 400 days = 1, 200 x 7-day weeks
72 x 1, 200 = 86, 400

86, 400 7-day weeks in 1, 656 years
86, 400 5-day weeks in 432, 000 days

Norse Mythology
and “in the Icelandic Poetic Edda it is told that in Odin’s heavenly warrior hall there were 540 doors:

Five hundred doors and forty there are,
I ween, in Valhall’s walls;
Eight hundred fighters through each door fare
When to war with the Wolf they go.

540 x 800 = 432 000

Indian Divine Years

1 200 x 201 = 241 000
1 200 x 380 = 456 000
1 200 x 360 = 432 000

Cosmology and Numberology

“history interpreted as a manifestation of myth.”

“Theindication would seem to be, therefore, that the highest concern of the mythology from which these kin lists derived [was based on] some sort of mathematically ordered, astronomically referred notion about the relationship of man and the rhythms of this life on earth, not simply to the seasons, the annual mysteries of birth, death and regeneration, but beyond those to even greater, very much larger cycles: the great years.”

“The mathematical law united botht [the lunar rhythm of the womb and celestial-terrestrial circumstance].”

http://theabysmal.wordpress.com/2006/09/16/mesopotamian-numberology/



This is pretty interseting as well, considering the ( so-called ) relatedness of the two mythologies..It being the Kali-Yuga, Armageddon, and Ragnarök all at the same time. ( Moral degradation as world changing, even after Nietzsche taught about the creation of morals :mad:) How come morality and "brother against brother" is of any importance in a cosmic cycle..?? I suppose the Zodiac and who I'm predestined to be..?:mad::confused: Are we talking Eternal Return..?:confused:


"In India, the number of years assigned to an eon (A 'Great Cycle' Mahayuga of cosmic time) is 4,320,000; whereas in Icelandic Poetic Edda it is declared that in Othin's warrior hall, Valhall, there are 540 doors, through each of which, on the 'day of the war of the wolf,' 800 battle-ready warriors will pass to engage the antigods in combat. But 540 times 800 equals 432,000!"
In "Hamlet's Mill" by Giorgio de Santillana and Hertha von Dechend, Gambit Inc. 1969 it states on page 162, "Odin in Valhalla says the Grinmnismal (23): 'Five hundred gates and forty more - are in the mighty building of Valhalla - eight hundred 'Einherier' come out of each one gate - on the time they go out on defence against the Wolf."
It continues with, "That makes 432,000 in all, a number significance from old."
"This number must have very ancient meaning, for it is also the number of syllables in the Rigveda. But it goes back to the basic figure 10,800, the number of stanzas in the Rigveda (40 syllables to a stanza) which together with 108 occurs insistently in Indian tradition. 10,800 is also the number which has been given by Heraclitus for the duration of the Aion, according to Censorius (Dedienatali, 18), whereas Berossos made the Babylonian Great Year to last 432,000 years."

Moreover, a Chaldean priest, Berossos, writing in Greek ca. 289 B.C., reported that according to Mesopotamian belief 432,000 years elapsed between the crowning of the first earthly king and the coming of the deluge. [The early Sumerian king list names eight kings with a total of 241,200 years from the time when "the kingship was lowered from heaven" to the time when "the Flood swept" over the land once more "the kingship was lowered from heaven" (Thorkild Jacobsen, The Sumerian King List, 1939, pp. 71, 77).]

No one, I should think, would wish to argue that these figures could have arisen independently in India, Iceland, and Babylon.

To complete one cycle of the zodiac--or, as it is called, one 'Great' or 'Platonic Year'--requires 25,920 years; which sum, divided by 60, (One soss, the founding unit of the old Mesopotamia sexagenary scale, still used for the measurement of circles, whether of space or time), yields, once again the number 432. So that the mythological count of 432,000 years not only cannot have been the product of any psychological archetype or elementary idea, but must have been discovered only through centuries of controlled astronomical observation." - "The Mythic Image" Joseph Campbell page 72-74.

http://www.mazzaroth.com/ChapterOne/TheAgeOfTheEarth.htm

All the interesting ideas aside. Ain't nothing going to happen, and if it does I'll eat me words.

Later,
-Lyfing

Cythraul
Friday, August 22nd, 2008, 12:07 AM
Lyfing, there's a book called Hamlets Mill (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamlet's_Mill) by Giorgio de Santillana and Hertha von Dechend. It deals precisely with the phenomena of ancient astrological and geometrical figures encoded within the world's mythologies - as though these myths and stories exist for the primary purpose of preserving sacred numbers vital to our understanding of the cosmos.

Guntwachar
Friday, August 22nd, 2008, 02:06 AM
I saw a docu about it when i was younger and it scared me, but now i think that if there will happen anything it will be the humans causing the end of humanity not the end of the world the world has survived alot more then us and i dont think it will just end.

Then again i think the Americans should know this also how many times did we have sort of Doomdays in the 1900's? my mother told me of atleast 6/7 dates that the end of the world was "coming" it never came but of course if you keep saying it long enough you will maybe be right someday.;)

Lyfing
Friday, August 22nd, 2008, 03:31 AM
Lyfing, there's a book called Hamlets Mill (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamlet's_Mill) by Giorgio de Santillana and Hertha von Dechend. It deals precisely with the phenomena of ancient astrological and geometrical figures encoded within the world's mythologies - as though these myths and stories exist for the primary purpose of preserving sacred numbers vital to our understanding of the cosmos.

I ain't read that one, but I'm kind of familiar with "ancient astrological and geometrical figures encoded within the world's mythologies"..I had to dig real deep to find these references which follow..not so fresh on the mind and lost in the bookmarks..I've not forgotten them though..One thing I must say before I go is that all these numbers seems to play Plato's symphony and I'm not so sure that is the case ( my disclaimer ) Is the universe numbered..are virtues numbered..well..there is a problem with the creation of morals here..unless one goes with him and say's something like " it is a pendulum or duality between the virtues which seem to be clearly defined perhaps numerically".

Anyhow..


A closely related form depicts what would appear to be horizontal dashes or "rungs" leading to the ancient sun-god, as in figure eleven. The resemblance to a spinal column with vertebrae is striking.

http://www.maverickscience.com/thundergods/stairway.gif

Figure eleven

In our essay on the "Milky Way," we argued that ancient traditions describing a fiery pillar, undulating serpent, luminous river, or ladder-like object spanning the heavens trace to the axis mundi associated with the ancient sun-god. With the disappearance of the Saturnian appendage, the traditions surrounding the original "Milky Way" were transferred its modern namesake, thereby fooling modern scholars into believing that this pale imitation could inspire such specific and complex myths as that of the celestial ladder along which transmigrating souls might pass to the celestial otherworld. Comparative analysis of the numerous mythological themes associated with the "Milky Way" will confirm this statement at every turn. Such an analysis will also provide important clues for the thundergod's former stomping grounds.

It is a striking fact that each of the aforementioned forms of the axis mundi is reflected in ancient epithets and traditions surrounding the Milky Way. That the Milky Way was often compared to a pillar-like form is well-documented. Thus, the Iraku of Africa call the Milky Way mugamba gwa ilunde: "the beam of the sky."

Numerous cultures compared the Milky Way to a giant serpent winding across the sky. The natives of the Nyassaland in Africa hold that the celestial band of stars is a great python. The Maya compared the Milky Way to a Fer-de-lance. The Australian aborigines likewise described the Milky Way as serpentine in nature.

Other cultures compared the Milky Way to a ladder spanning heaven. Such ideas are attested in the New World among the Navaho:

"In Acoma sandpaintings the Milky Way appears as a ladder, for it is thought that these stars form a bridge to the heavens. In the Acoma creation myth, the roof beams of the first kiva represent the Milky Way."

The same idea is attested in ancient and medieval Europe, as Cook has documented with his usual thoroughness.

A very widespread idea compared the Milky Way to the "backbone" of heaven. The Shoshone call the Milky Way the "Backbone of the Sky." The Chumash call it "Night's Backbone." The Tipai of California knew the Milky Way as "Sky-Its-Backbone." The Tewa speaking Pueblo called the Milky Way "Backbone of the Universe." The Assiniboin of Minnesota and Winnipeg describe the celestial river as the "Backbone of the Sky."

The same idea is to be found in Africa. Thus, the San peoples of Northern Namibia call the Milky Way "night's backbone."

A remarkable fact, hitherto unnoticed so far I'm aware, is that thundergods everywhere are described as residing or moving in close proximity to the Milky Way, yet another tradition that finds little rationale in the current solar system but accords perfectly with the interpretation offered here, whereby the thundergod is identified with Mars and intimately associated with the axis mundi. Thus, Ovid describes the Milky Way as follows:

"There is a lofty road, plain to see in a clear sky; it has the name 'milky', and is famous for its brilliance. This is the way taken by Those Above to the roofs and royal house of the great Thunderer."

Among the Sotho of South Africa, the "Milky Way" is known as molala-tladi, "the roosting place of the tladi bird." Yet Tladi himself was the African equivalent of the Thunderbird, the bringer of lightning. Most significant, perhaps, in light of what has been said previously with respect to the Milky Way as a World Pillar, is the Sotho belief that the molala-tladi "supports the sky to prevent it from falling on the earth."

The Incan thundergod Illapa, according to the Franciscan friar Cobo, formerly moved along the Milky Way:

"They say that he passed across a very large river in the middle of the sky. They indicated that this river was the white band that we see down here called the Milky Way. Regarding this matter, they made up a great deal of foolishness that would be too detailed to include here."

In Chorti lore, the Milky Way is known as the "Road of Santiago," after their thundergod. Santiago also doubles as a god of war and is identified with the "Morning Star."

Similar traditions surround various mythical heroes identified with the planet Mars, as we have elsewhere documented. The Australian warrior-hero Waijungare, expressly identified with the red planet, is said to live in the Milky Way. The Aztec Tezcatlipoca, also identified with the "Morning Star," was described as living along the Milky Way.

As we documented in "The Stairway to Heaven," ancient myths from the New World as well as the Old describe the planet Mars as intimately associated with a celestial ladder. In Assyrian lore, for example, Nergal/Mars is described as mounting the celestial ladder and ascending to heaven. The Makirtare Indians, a people living along the banks of the Orinoco river in what is now Venezuela, report a similar tradition: the planet Mars, they say, "built the ladder in space."

Numerous mythical traditions credit Martian heroes with the ability to freely ascend or descend the axis mundi. The Aztec war-god Tezcatlipoca, for example, is described as having once descended to earth along a giant rope spanning heaven. It is our opinion that such traditions confirm Mars' intimate relationship to the axis mundi and likely reflect that planet's elliptical orbit during various stages of the polar configuration.

Here it is significant to note that ancient descriptions of the Milky Way dovetail at various points with descriptions of the behavior of lightning and thunderbolts. The Pima Indians of New Mexico, for example, share the widespread belief that the lightning moves in zigzag fashion. Yet they also ascribe a zigzagging form to the Milky Way:

"I believe that the 'crooked (jujul ) trail going west' is a metaphor for the Milky Way in its aspect as the trail to the land of the dead. The Piman word jujul also means 'zigzag'; in one of the Rain Songs it is used to describe the behavior of lightning: 'lightning moving very zig-zag, roaring beautifully…Perhaps 'crooked trail' is also a metaphor for lightning trail. The shaman's ladder to the sky is also known as the zigzag ladder."

If we now turn to the image represented in figure twelve, which depicts the "Milky Way" in Navaho art—the Navaho being close neighbors of the Pima—the celestial reference for the zigzagging form will be readily apparent.

http://www.maverickscience.com/thundergods/milky_way.jpg.gif

Figure twelve

Various other phases in the history of the polar configuration can be reconstructed as well, the axis mundi alternately assuming the appearance of a chain of wedges or arrows, often compared to a ladder; a towering pile of serpent-like coils; and a pyramidal or ziggurat-like form. A detailed analysis of these respective forms would be impossible here, but the problem deserves careful study insofar as the forms reconstructed from comparative mythical analysis and depicted in rock art resemble forms seen during certain laboratory experiments involving high-energy plasma discharges. Here ancient lore and modern science appear to converge at a level of detail difficult to explain as mere coincidence. For the first time in history, perhaps, the physical sciences are in a position to illuminate prominent mythical themes. Be this as it may, an accurate reconstruction of the various forms assumed by the axis mundi is certain to tell us a great deal about ancient myth in general and the biography of the thundergod in particular.

While Saturnists have typically assumed the axis mundi to be composed of gaseous atmospheric efflux and asteroidal debris, it is equally likely that plasmatic phenomena like Birkeland currents played a prominent role in its physical form and visual appearance. If so, it stands to reason that Birkeland currents and related phenomena would be reflected in the sacred iconography surrounding the axis mundi.

In figure thirteen, Adad's lightning/thunderbolt assumes the very position otherwise associated with the axis mundi or World Pillar—as a support for the ancient sun-god. Note also that the lightning/thunderbolt is represented as a zigzagging form, thereby conforming to a universal conception.
http://www.maverickscience.com/thundergods/blitzladder.jpg

Figure Thirteen

A certain parallel to the Mesopotamian cylinder seal is offered by an American Indian representation of the Thunderbird (see figure fourteen). Here, too, the zigzagging form of the thunderbolt is a point of emphasis. Also interesting is the fact that the lightning is believed to emanate from the "heart" of the Thunderbird, the latter represented as an orb-like object.
http://www.maverickscience.com/thundergods/thunderbird.jpg

Figure Fourteen

Conclusion

To sum up our survey of thundergod lore to this point: the thundergod is inextricably associated with the ancient sun-god, in ancient myth as well as in sacred iconography. The god's lightning is said to emanate from the region of the sun or from a celestial eye. We are not the first to notice this connection between the sun and the thundergod. Morris Jastrow, the great Assyriologist, observed that: "In many mythologies the sun and lightning are regarded as correlated forces." Arthur Cook, similarly, concluded: "The sun-god has much in common with the thunder-god."

The answer as to why this should be the case, although perfectly obvious once the relevant evidence is brought forward, has escaped previous scholars because they were conditioned to seek an explanation by reference to the current skies and familiar meteorological effects. Yet one will never explain the specific traditions surrounding the ancient thundergods by reference to the current skies and commonplace meteorological phenomena. The true story is much more exciting and cataclysmic from start to finish. For the ancient thundergod was the planet Mars and the prototypical "lightning" an interplanetary discharge of stupendous proportion. The archetypal thundergod formerly resided at the "heart of heaven" or, more specifically, in the middle of the ancient sun-god. There, nestled inside the planet Venus, he presided over the sacred heavenly fire while kindling his paramour's passion.

As an apparent product of the various interactions between Mars and Venus, lightning itself was everywhere associated with the center of the ancient sun-god and thus came to share many of the mythical motifs associated with that sacred region. It stands to reason that ancient languages will also preserve this archetypal relation between the celestial lightning and its place of origin in the heart or "eye" of the Sun/Venus. Not being a linguist myself, I'll leave the documentation of this claim to others more capable of properly assessing the evidence. Yet a few hints are in order by way of introduction to the goldmine that likely awaits the diligent researcher. One should look for connections between "lightning" words and words signifying "sun," "center," "star," "eye," "glance," Venus, "Morning Star," etc. A Greek word for lightning, asterope, for example, is likely related to aster, "star," the latter word itself tracing to the centrally located Venus-star (actually Venus and Mars in conjunction). The German word blitzen is thought to derive from the root bhleig, "glanzen," from which also derives the Middle German blic, "glance, lightning." The Latin word for lightning, fulgur, is derived from the root bhleg. Among the other words derived from the same root is the Middle Irish imblissiu, "eye-star."

The future is bright, it would appear, for those who will follow the mythical lightning to its original source.

http://www.maverickscience.com/thundergods.htm

They figure that mythological motifs were at one time observed in outer space close enough to earth and interpreted mythologically, whereas, there is now a scientific explanation.


The World Pillar

One called this destroyed pillar Irminsul. Generally it is said that this word means "column of Irmin ", after the name of a mysterious Germanic God. But some propose to translate it by "gigantic column", without any link with a God IRMIN.

It would be quite difficult to speak briefly here of IRMIN. Just let me tell you two or three small points. Many specialists have discussed the reality of this God's existence. It seems certain that there was a God called IRMIN in the Saxon Hof (I use Hof with a capital, in place of the Greek Pantheon). Again maybe, this name only means GREAT GOD. As far as we can observe him, he can be identified with Tyr/Tiwaz - see the form of the Tiwaz rune, which could be a link between Irminsul and TYR - or identified with Heimdal. In former texts, I have given my preference to this latter solution.

Heimdal has been identified with Yggdrasil and Jörmungand.

It is a very long demonstration. Professor Régis Boyer, in France, one of the most important specialists of the Old Norse religion, has written a book to explain this identification.

Just to understand, I give you here some tracks to follow to understand this identification between Yggdrasil and Heimdal. We know the links between men and trees in the north. The first man and woman were created from trees. Yggdrasil is the sacred tree and Heimdal the god of men, of the human society when he creates the three functions. The Yggdrasil tree is the link between the world, a bridge, like the Bifrost rainbow. However, Heimdal is the warder of the bridge. And this god lives in Himinbjörg, the sky mountain, in which we can easily recognize a central concept, similar to the Ur-Welt, the original land, or the world tree.

The real meaning of this name - Heimdal - is mysterious, but it is sure that it conveys an idea of pillar. This Heimdal - for a lot of reasons - is bound to some ideas of universal origin and support. Furthermore, in a stirring idea of polarity, some identify Heimdal, Yggdrasil and Jörmungand, the world serpent.

Some elements to justify this hypothesis :

It is said that Heimdal's head is an Iron Sword, which could evoke the head of a snake. The name Jörmungand means GREAT GAND or WAND, which could describe Yggdrasil.

The nine sisters - the nine Mothers of Heimdal's - could evoke the nine worlds and these sisters are described as nine waves, which bring us back to the sea where Jörmungand lives.

Jörmungand is like the Greek and alchemical snake Ouroboros which bites its own tail. It is a threat for the world, but it is the world and its support itself.

When Yggdrasil will collapse, when Midgardsomr - Jörmungand - will uncoil itself, when Heimdal will be overcome by Loki, it will be the end of the world, say the old texts.

One would need books to explain this polar symbolism, but it works.

And so, to come back to IRMIN, I prefer the identification between IRMIN with Heimdal, rather than Tyr.

And last important point:

In the Germanic countries, columns were often raised on geomantic or symbolic places (crossroads, city centres). In England, they are often called perrons, market cross or butter cross or staple. But in Germany, these columns were called IRMINSÄULE (Irminsul) or Roland Saüle. It is an allusion to Roland, the Carolingian hero of Roncevaux battle, the friend of Charlemagne. In fact, behind Roland, we must see the archetypal representation of a Horn bearer or a Horn blower (anyway, it would have been - and it is - strange and paradoxical to take the name of a Carolingian hero, as the Carolingians destroyed the Irminsul).

Roland is famous for his horn. And do not forget that the Horn blower god is Heimdal (and, under his IRMIN name, he gave is old names to the columns, which from Irminsaülen became Rolandsaülen).

Well, in fact, the Belgian count and famous esoterist and symbolist Goblet d'Alviella said that the name of similar columns were Tiodute, that is "pillar of Tyr". Thus, we could again go very far in our explanations. But we must stop here, to come back to our Irminsul.

The Irminsul represented Yggdrasil, the cosmic axis.

http://odinic-rite.org/irminsul.html

Ain't Irmin's way called the Milky Way..??

Later,
-Lyfing

Oski
Friday, August 22nd, 2008, 05:46 AM
Sort of off topic:

A few years ago I had an intense nightmare where I was standing in Moscow, looking a the big ben clock that stated it was 2012. In the other direction there was an explosion so big it was setting the atmosphere on fire (the northern lights were glowing blue and purple of fire).

People were in a panic and I couldn't move an inch.

...Weird dream huh?

Cuchulain
Friday, August 22nd, 2008, 07:06 PM
Am I the only one who is kind of rooting for this to happen?

Oswiu
Saturday, August 23rd, 2008, 10:10 PM
I saw on the telly tonight a documentary about "The World After Humans", which imagined that we were completely wiped out, and what the results would be for nature, and how our cities would crumble and eventually disappear. Great footage of a town called Pripyat which has been left to rot for two decades since Chernobyl - all pre deSovietisation!

I'm wondering though, are they broadcasting this sort of thing to tell us something??! Do they know something we don't and feel that they should gently prepare us for it? They showed how probably the only things that will last millenia are the strongest stone structures and carvings, for example Mount Rushmore in the USA. Quite clear analogies were made with the Sphinx and Pyramids. They even imagined that "our replacements" might be along soon enough to look on these with awe... (Maybe they're hinting at how pre Ice Age civilisations have been and gone.... :p)

Cythraul
Sunday, August 24th, 2008, 12:28 AM
I'm wondering though, are they broadcasting this sort of thing to tell us something??! Do they know something we don't and feel that they should gently prepare us for it?
Careful Oswiu - you're in danger of joining the tin hat club, like me ;). I've seen this very subject discussed a number of times at this forum (http://www.abovetopsecret.com). The same point is made about the recent increase in UFO media attention. Actually, I'm not sure so much about here in Britain, but a lot of American conspiracy theorists claim to have noticed a significant increase in documentaries dealing with end-of-world scenarios - whether that be comets, 2012, or some other cataclysm. It is often mentioned that the Bush family have just bought up enormous amounts of land in Paraguay, the suggestion being that the elite know of a coming catastrophe and are preparing themselves for survival. We do seem to be fascinated with the fragility of the planet at the moment don't we. I'm not sure whether there's a conspiracy there or whether we're just becoming more considerate of our impact on the planet.

SuuT
Wednesday, August 27th, 2008, 05:14 AM
It is all too easy to be a consumer of fear, as opposed to a producer of Will. And some of you are very bored.

the world begins anew - in cosmolgical balance - in 2012, according to the Mayan calander: the whole thing resets.

Lyfing has some interseting posts in other threads directly relating to the numerology/astrology/ of Occidental and all Aryan mythologies.



But let's assume the worst... what do you want out of the remainder of your life?

A wait for it to end? - what a pitiful, and cowardly, way to live.

Maybe we're just doing the prep work for the reign of the cockroaches. - Same question: what do you want out of the remainder of your life...?


When a meaningful life has been lived, it is an impossibility to fear any form of death; and even pain recedes into the ether. Walk into the Tsunami as it approaches; sit before the mushroom cloud in your god pose as the inferno bullets toward you; pay no mind to the pigs that root about you. And you shall be rewarded with it all again: the honour, of seeing the begining end.

Gagnraad
Wednesday, August 27th, 2008, 02:34 PM
First off: That Ragnarok-thing, were you are depicting the end of the world by the amount of doors and warriors? Doesn't it sound a bit too coincidental?


But I wonder, is the end of the world truly that horrifying? I mean, the end of the world as mankind knows it, is in fact the end of mankind. So, if we all wound up and died on the spot, we would do Mother Earth a huge favour.
Besides, why are all people concerned anyways? What better way to die, than with the rest of the humanity? We live once, and we die once. So cherish it!

Anyways, I am pretty sure the rest of the planet will be waiting for us, when evolution kicks back in, and we begin anew... From the bacteria we originally came from.

But, we have to see whether the prophecies are bound to be true or not. We can speculate all day and night, but the only way to be sure, is to wait till 2012 and see for ourself.

PS:
How are you really sure they were talking about the end of the world? Couldn't it be the amount of fish they caught that month? Or the amount of people in that, and surrounding villages? Or even, the date when one of their Gods would be resurrected from the netherworlds?

PPS:
I don't trust people who translate ancient scripts. ;)

flemish
Wednesday, August 27th, 2008, 08:47 PM
I refuse to believe that the ancestors of Mexicans:rolleyes: had that much insight into the future.

Teuton
Wednesday, August 27th, 2008, 08:58 PM
We'll know when the end comes when it comes, no-one can predict it.

Cythraul
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 08:35 AM
I refuse to believe that the ancestors of Mexicans:rolleyes: had that much insight into the future.
Do you not think that we Germanics are for the most part a shadow of our former selves too? The Mexican golden age may be forgotten, but in my opinion, the entire world - including us - has seen its finest hour.

Mrs. Lyfing
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 03:12 PM
All the interesting ideas aside. Ain't nothing going to happen, and if it does I'll eat me words.

Well, honey I hope you don't get to eat your words...2012, just ain't enough time for me to be married to you and see my children, I mean I would only be 30 years old and the kids, 8 and 11, so nope. We ain't going out like that! :D

I just now read this thread, I knew to stay away...these things give me the creeps even though, really, I think no one knows what and when what will happen.

Cythraul
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 04:21 PM
just ain't enough time for me to be married to you and see my children, I mean I would only be 30 years old and the kids, 8 and 11, so nope. We ain't going out like that! :D[/COLOR]
Although in a sense I feel mankind has outstayed its welcome on planet Earth (the majority ruining it for the few) and am happy to let nature take its course, for selfish reasons I don't want my opportunity to have a family and achieve my ambitions taken away from me. But we'll see. What happens happens.

Cúchulainn-Rurik
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 04:32 PM
Waiting for the end impatiently. If it's anything it will be a world-wide cataclysm, destroying established cosmopolitan civilisation and ushering in a new, agrarian age in which natural living will replace this artificial cesspool called society.

I'm all for that. Just gotta survive the catastrophe and then can enjoy the simple life.

Mrs. Lyfing
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 04:33 PM
Although in a sense I feel mankind has outstayed its welcome on planet Earth (the majority ruining it for the few) and am happy to let nature take its course, for selfish reasons I don't want my opportunity to have a family and achieve my ambitions taken away from me. But we'll see. What happens happens.


What if mankind hasn't outlived itself? What if in many years, things of the old are reborn? What am I saying? Oh, I know, I am saying what if good can come again? :) ( don't hate me cause I day dream ) not a bad dream to have, if I say so myself. :D

I understand exactly what you are saying Cythraul, only I seem more selfish. I am not happy to let nature takes it course until at least..my own, my husband and children lives are over.

Æmeric
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 04:41 PM
I don't believe the world will end in 2012. But I had a thought. What if the powers that be - the elites who get to manipulate events, the taskmasters to our democratically elected leaders, believe it will end on Dec. 21, 2012? The Bilderburgers (illuminati), Skull & Bones, Bohemia Grove (Moloch) & other New Age freaks. Maybe their beliefs is why they are trying to create a one-world utopia to greet the extraterrestrials who will land on that date (:rolleyes:). Or maybe like a group of teenage boys who might vandalize a house scheduled for demolition, they have decided to destroy our civilization before the world ends. Just a thought.

Cythraul
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 06:56 PM
Æmeric - I don't think what you're saying there is actually all that outrageous. This might just be the conspiracy theorist in me coming out again, but I strongly believe the Illuminati, and many among the Freemasons are the current incarnation of a singular legacy which has existed since distant antiquity - back through the Templar Knights, the early Church, the Druids, the Megalithics, the Greeks, the Egyptians, the Sumerians... and so on. This legacy's sole purpose has been to protect a sacred knowledge handed down to them over the centuries - sacred knowledge which to our eyes merely translates as geometry, ritual, and myth, but to their eyes means the ultimate knowledge of the nature of our universe. The knowledge of the Mayans would be a part of this and I think that some of the secret societies in existence today take predictions like 2012 very seriously indeed. However, the Illuminati clearly have big plans for the world which will not come to fruition within 4 years, so they must strongly believe that there'll be some remnant of civilisation following whatever cataclysm occurs.

rainman
Saturday, October 18th, 2008, 05:29 PM
The world ended in the New Testament Bible as well. Many people are waiting for the end days but Jesus said "my generation will not pass before the end times occurs". That was the passing into a "new age" of pisces (the fish). Thus Christians use a fish as their symbol of Jesus. In 2018 or so we pass out of pisces into aquarius. I think my spellings right. anyway. the Mayan calandar puts the new age around 2012. Considering we are dealing with time frames of thousands of years I don't think that is much of difference...

Anyway to understand it you have to understand astrology. There are a lot of energies that come from space. Modern science may not admit it but we are a small island in a giant sea of space. Therefore depending on what direction we are pointing at or where we are in space it effects earth. When we pass into a new age you may see things like a shift in weather patterns (hmm global warming anyone- probably has at least some to do with this and not just pollution). You also see a change in human behavior as different energies or forces effect them.

This may seem far out but it is proven that something as simple as temperature effects someones mood. Higher temps cause people to get more agressive, more likely to fight, but also perhaps more relaxed, a different mindset in other words. A full moon causes a change in human behavior and tides. So some cosmic radiation from space could be effecting human behavior in a very slight way. On the individual level this slight change is hardly noticeable. But it adds up when every single person in society is effected by it usually society has an ideological shift. This coupled with weather changes usually causes a big disruption in human society.

We have basically 12 ages that repeat on a giant scale. These are the 12 zodiac signs. It isn't something humans "made up". It is a real science that you can learn if you study the sky and its effects on mankind.

The illuminati and such will probably use these dates to make their own changes which will make it even stronger. 9/11 is one of their sacred numbers for example.

But the world isn't going to end. The "age" will. Just as in the Bible "age" is mistranslated as days in genesis (God made the world is seven periods or ages which is why we have 7 days in a week. This too wasn't randomly made up but corresponds to astrology. The planet goes through cycles every seven days in the heavens). The same as in the new testament they speak of the "end of an age".

What happened last time around 1 A.D. when the age changed? We went from the classical world and within a couple hundred years were in the dark ages. Only very recently as we have started passing out of the age of the fish have we started to see a change in society. The "New Age" is supposed to be a more learned or enlightened one. The age of the fish is more emotional (Christianity, communism etc.) Coincidence?

Athalwulf
Saturday, October 18th, 2008, 05:34 PM
When we pass into a new age you may see things like a shift in weather patterns (hmm global warming anyone- probably has at least some to do with this and not just pollution).

Most people also deny the fact that our sun is dying.

I don't believe any of this Mayan calendar or Bible stuff though. The end of the world will be preceded by the arrival of the fimbul winter.

Loki
Sunday, October 26th, 2008, 11:21 AM
The way things are going right now, it looks more like 2008 or 2009.

:|

frippardthree
Tuesday, October 13th, 2009, 08:07 AM
I'm not really convinced, but this is fascinating. I'm not superstitious.:)


2012 Predictions

This site is a directory of links to prophecies and predictions relating to the year 2012, no matter whether they relate to global catastrophes, changes of consciousness, or mundane predictions about science and economy. Which ones turn out to be correct will be revealed in the fullness of time ....

The aim is to provide signposting to other sites as simply and objectively as possible, and it is an ongoing work. If you know of a link which is not featured on this site, please let me know. The predictions could come from any source: spiritual, religious, scientific, political, economic, medical, astrological etc.

Any descriptions given in "quotation marks" are taken directly from the sites themselves.The author of this website is not responsible for any of the content contained in the websites to which it links.

Retrieved From:http://www.2012predictions.net/

http://www.2012predictions.net/images/bam.jpg

Nordlander
Tuesday, October 13th, 2009, 12:53 PM
Beam me up Scottie ;there is no intellegent life down here

rainman
Tuesday, October 13th, 2009, 07:59 PM
The mayan calendar is a calendar it does not predict anything. Their Calendar was more advanced than our modern one though. The Calendar ends in 2012 because its the start of a new age astrologically speaking. We are leaving Pisces and entering Aquarius I think. This means there will be a different astrological energy frequency influencing mankind. It won't happen suddenly. It is already starting to show and will take time. Around the time when we shifted into Pices Christianity came about. Maybe the heathen revival is partly influenced by this new astrological energy. Nothing amazing is going to happen in 2012 but looking back we will see this general period as one of change.

Thorodinssohn
Sunday, March 28th, 2010, 01:54 AM
I think its funny that so many people around the world have placed any stock in the mayan calendar heralding the end of the world. If the myans had any ability to predict the future, why did they not foresee their own demise?

For what its worth, the white heathen world ended in 1000 C.E. with the official conversion of Iceland by their king to Christianity. That really heralded the end of widespread powerful paganism. I call it Ragnarok, where the old world was destroyed and the seeds of a new mankind were sown. Now, with a Heathen revival, mankind has begun to drag itself from the ashes. Maybe 2012 will bring with it a new age for those of Aesir blood.

Cheers!

Ediruc
Tuesday, May 25th, 2010, 08:44 AM
If the doomsday scenario was in the leaning of the entire White race getting slaughtered off by a whole mad uprising of the third-world and a cult of conspirators who planned it all along throughout history, then, yes, I would say realistically the world will end in 2012.

But, then again, the mesoamericans were just a bunch of savage idiots who got their arses beat by a few Spaniards with guns. Oh, hey, did you know that the Mayans (or was it the Aztecs? Oh well!) believe the sun was made of feathers and that you had to rip out a beating human heart to keep the sun moving in the sky? Call me crazy for not believing in the Mayan predictions for the end of the world....

Irby
Tuesday, May 25th, 2010, 09:52 AM
The world ends for all of us when we die, so just live this life, and try and make a change in anyway we can.

The biggest difficulty we all face as Nihilism, which for me means, this life has no meaning or that you existence here is some kind of terrible misfortune, "the worst thing is to have been born, the next best thing is to die quickly" kind of attitude.

We, with the help of the Gods can make a difference, what we have to do is make the best, of any situation that occurrs, whether good or bad.

Just sometimes I feel if all this talk of Apocalypse, stems from our in-grained Christan thought.

When the time is right, the Gods will give us the opportunity, to win our freedom, but freedom is not free, and you have to prepare yourself, physically, intellectually and spiritually. Rather than just sitting there waiting to die.

Gardisten
Wednesday, May 26th, 2010, 04:29 AM
The Bible does not provide clues to a date for the end times. I am sick and tired of the cranks--eg. Jack Van Impe--who have misguided so many people with their preaching on this subject. As for the Mayan calender, well, what a load of nonsense.

frippardthree
Wednesday, May 26th, 2010, 06:01 AM
Nearly every ancient culture has developed their fair share of meaningless superstitions, and the Mayans were no exception. I am neither a linguist nor an astronomer, but I believe that the Mayan calender could probably be interpreted in any number of ways.



THE MAYAN CALENDAR DOES NOT END IN 2012

KEEP READING!!!

The date December 21st, 2012 A.D. (13.0.0.0.0 in the Long Count), represents an extremely close conjunction of the Winter Solstice Sun with the crossing point of the Galactic Equator (Equator of the Milky Way) and the Ecliptic (path of the Sun), what that ancient Maya recognized as the Sacred Tree. This is an event that has been coming to
resonance very slowly over thousands and thousands of years. It will come to resolution at exactly 11:11 am GMT.

Retrieved From:http://www.greatdreams.com/2012.htm

arcticdoctor
Wednesday, May 26th, 2010, 08:24 AM
This may be slightly off topic but what-the-heck.
I read an article by some "scientists" who were trashing astrology.
They laughingly said that the idea that the position of the planets at your
birth could have an effect on you was crazy because the gravitational
force of your obstetrician was greater than the gravitational force of
the sun or planets.

You know, it's stupid statements like this from "scientists" that have
destroyed my "faith" in "Science".
You know, I guess the gravitational force of your GD obstetrician can
raise the level of the ocean 10 feet twice a day.

And while we are trashing stupid "scientists", in the preamble to the
oncologists' chemotherapy cookbook, the cancer quacks took it upon
themselves to trash alternative cancer treatments (I guess they were worried the competition might cut into their profits).
Anyway, these brilliant "doctors" stated that there was absolutely no
scientific evidence that "shinning colored lights on people" had any
physiological effect.
WTF!! No scientific evidence that shinning colored lights on people
has a physiological effect??
What GD medical school did these twits go to? Any doctor that bothered
to stay awake in OBGYN knows that every nursery in every hospital in
every GD town in the western world has blue lights to treat newborn
jaundice!!
Geez, and they wonder why I think oncologists are the real quacks.

Hamar Fox
Thursday, June 3rd, 2010, 09:09 AM
Yes, I think the world will end in 2012, just like it did in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003...4...5...6...and every other year the world was supposed to end.

Northern Paladin
Saturday, September 11th, 2010, 05:50 AM
Earthquakes? Conspiracy theories coming to pass? Meteorites?

I personally believe the Anunnaki will return to earth and bring justice back, I believe they are White Nordic types and will set the stage for a new beginning.

VitkiValkyrie
Saturday, September 11th, 2010, 02:36 PM
As to the Anunaki, some of them had little regard for their human followers. Some were immoral by our standards, and they didn't hesitate to use humans as canon-fodder.. 2012 will come and go, like the y2k bug in my opinion.

Astrid Runa
Tuesday, November 30th, 2010, 10:41 PM
I don't believe that the world will end, but I do believe that something will happen. The rumblings in The Otherworld are evidence enough of that.
I believe that there will be an awakening. Those that do not believe in magick and magickal creatures will See that these things exist.
It will be Gaia's last ditch effort to save herself.

SaxonPagan
Wednesday, December 1st, 2010, 02:19 AM
Yes, I think the world will end in 2012, just like it did in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003...4...5...6...and every other year the world was supposed to end.

Very good, Hamar :D except that the 2012 prediction has been around for a few centuries and I'll tell you what ... it probably won't be that far out ;)

Things are bubbling up quite nicely, what with the Iranians getting their hands on some heavy artillery and now this latest Korean business. Throw in a severe financial crisis for good measure and I think that most of the ingredients are there!

Hamar Fox
Wednesday, December 1st, 2010, 07:48 AM
Very good, Hamar :D except that the 2012 prediction has been around for a few centuries and I'll tell you what ... it probably won't be that far out ;)

Things are bubbling up quite nicely, what with the Iranians getting their hands on some heavy artillery and now this latest Korean business. Throw in a severe financial crisis for good measure and I think that most of the ingredients are there!

Yeah, but when isn't something going on in the world? I think people who attach themselves to the 2012 prophecy are going to damage themselves, especially if they've built some kind of career around mysticism.

Smart prophets predict things way into the future, so that they'll be dead by the time everyone finds out they were phony. A lot of careers are going to be finished once 2013 rolls around, though.

Edit: Although I know this is just wishful thinking. I've no doubt they'll find some ridiculous way of worming themselves out of it.

Astrid Runa
Wednesday, December 1st, 2010, 10:08 AM
I haven't seen the end of the world. *shrugs*
I don't think it's going to happen, and the fact that very few people have seen anything that may suggest that the world will end soon suggests that it either won't, or that it's going to creep up on us and kick us where it hurts.
I sincerely hope that the latter isn't the most likely....

Heinrich Harrer
Wednesday, December 1st, 2010, 10:27 AM
Reminds me of that movie


Milton Auglund: Well I predict that the world will end at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve.
Dr. Peter Venkman: This year?
Milton Auglund: MmHmm.
Dr. Peter Venkman: Well that's cutting it a little bit close, isn't it? I mean, just from a sales point of view, I mean your book is just coming out, you're not gonna see any paperback sales for at least a year. It'll be at least another year before you know whether you've got that mini-series or movie of the week kind of possibilities. I mean just Devil's Advocate Milty! I mean shouldn't you have said: Hey the worlds going to end in 1992! Or better yet 1994!
Milton Auglund: This is not just some money-making scheme! Alright! I have a strong psychic belief that the world will end on New Year's Eve. [begins to cry]
Dr. Peter Venkman: Well, for your sake, I hope you're right.


At least they still have over a year till 2012 to sell their books. :D

Bwana Doc
Wednesday, December 1st, 2010, 05:10 PM
We'll have a presidential election in the U.S. that could be apocalyptic...:)

Caledonian
Wednesday, December 1st, 2010, 05:19 PM
Not that I believe in absurd superstitions or prophecies but if the world did end honestly I don't think it would be such a bad thing considering the absurd reality of this world currently.

I would say to nature and the universe to give us it's worse for all I care.

I just don't really care either way anymore.

And if I survived in a post apocalypse world all the more fun for me.

[ I wouldn't certainly have to worry about working for another anymore in a post apocalypse world where money would become meaningless to own.]

[I would of course make my own damn rules naturally.]

So whether the world ends or not I'll survive comfortably all the same in that I'm a ruthless survivor and a overall adaptive SOB.

Now if the world was to end entirely leaving nothing left afterwards like a nice asteroid sent to earth I would just sit in a lawn chair somewhere wearing dark shaded sun glasses as I would raise a bottle of scotch in a sort of final toast gesture at the last minute of the final hour to the absurdity of this existence taking in a nice drink before being obliterated myself along with everything else.

[That is atleast how I have always visioned it if I ever lived long enough to see the day.]

So while there is panic at the subject with people for me there is only calm and ease.

DerWeißeWehrwolf
Wednesday, December 1st, 2010, 05:51 PM
I think if it happens, it wont be an extinction, just a cleansing. The colored mongrols & liberals will be wiped out. :thumbup

arcticdoctor
Wednesday, December 29th, 2010, 05:45 PM
I think if it happens, it wont be an extinction, just a cleansing. The colored mongrols & liberals will be wiped out. :thumbup

The mongrels would be nice, the liberals sublime!



1)Nibiru Cometh! 2)Nibiru Arrives! 3)Excavating the Underground Retreat!

4)Arranging the furniture in the Retreat.

5)Exiting the Retreat into the Post-Apocalyptic World!

6)&7)Checking out Post-Apocalyptic Los Angeles!

8) The Post-Apocalyptic World! Really, what do we have to worry about?!

Meister
Friday, January 14th, 2011, 02:20 PM
If some of us do survive god help me the first person who mentions the words "Government", "Socialism" and "we must re build the world exactly as it was" will be stoned to death.

Wychaert
Friday, January 14th, 2011, 03:15 PM
If most of humanity is dead, and I would live?
I finaly can build my own house. Made out of human skulls!!

Heinrich Harrer
Friday, January 14th, 2011, 04:35 PM
If most of humanity is dead, and I would live?
I finaly can build my own house. Made out of human skulls!!

So your future living room will look like this?
http://i.imgur.com/X0qUu.jpg

Ingvaeonic
Friday, January 14th, 2011, 04:55 PM
The Mayan Calendar ends on December 21, 2012 - is this the end of the world? :D
Check out this (http://www.survive2012.com/).

Could this be the end of the world? Let's hope so. If it really is the end on 21 Dec. 2012, and I'm prepared to be disappointed, then it will be great that I shall have outlasted, and so defeated, the devilishly acquisitive Deputy Commissioner of Taxation of the diabolically evil Australian Taxation Office. A great moral victory for the (possibly) soon-to-be-extinct Australian taxpayer. Let's just hope the bloody Mayans have got it right.

Wychaert
Friday, January 14th, 2011, 05:36 PM
So your future living room will look like this?
http://i.imgur.com/X0qUu.jpg

:thumbup, Yep! sort of.

Schooneveld
Saturday, January 15th, 2011, 06:54 PM
Yes ofcourse! My calender says that France will turn into a giant black hole, the British and their island will try to make a transatlantic voyage but will collide with Iceland and follow their beloved ship, the Germans will invent a nuclear saucage and blow themselves up, the Americans will all get abducted by aliens(the anal probe type of aliens), the Scandinavians will all turn into Vikings and will be duking it out with the Spartans in a battle that last forever and Japan will get eaten by both Godzilla and Moby Dick.

Sounds pretty apocalyptic to me.;)

Centaur
Wednesday, January 26th, 2011, 11:55 AM
Here is a cool video from a guy at NASA's JPL about the 2012 theory:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/video/index.cfm?id=876

http://www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/2012.html

Æmeric
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 06:33 PM
....until the end of time, December 21, 2012. According to the Mayan & other ancient calenders. Any thoughts or predictions on what happens a year from now? Will we still be around on December 22, 2012?

Huginn ok Muninn
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 06:55 PM
Good... that will give us a week to see The Hobbit:

G0k3kHtyoqc

It comes out 12/14/2012. ;)

Wulfram
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 06:57 PM
Some people say it will be the end of life, others say it will be a rebirth. Some like myself, think it is bullshit. Is there any evidence of this being predicted by Germanics from the past? Just because the mayans had an impressive knowledge of the stars does not mean they could also predict the future. There is no record of a single mayan having ever witnessed the previous "end of the world", which they claim come in cycles. Besides, how many members here at Skadi have actually sat down and worked out these calculations themselves?

Here is my own wacky interpretation :P:

Why has this been popularized so much by the jewish mainstream press? Walk into any Barnes and Noble and you will find numerous books on the subject. Perhaps they are taking an old legend and using it to fool people into assuming something is going to happen. They can then manufacture they're own "2012" to make people think the real thing is actually happening (as predicted by the ancients mayans, because why would the ancient mayans lie to us?). They may then try to "save" us all from the impending doom, even causing world wide disasters to prove that the final coup-de-grace stroke is not far behind. When they do "save" us, everybody will be so thankful they will hardly notice how the event has forever enslaved them.

Huginn ok Muninn
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 07:10 PM
Why has this been popularized so much by the jewish mainstream press? Walk into any Barnes and Noble and you will find numerous books on the subject. Perhaps they are taking an old legend and using it to fool people into assuming something is going to happen. They can then manufacture they're own "2012" to make people think the real thing is actually happening (as predicted by the ancients mayans, because why would the ancient mayans lie to us?). They may then try to "save" us all from the impending doom, even causing world wide disasters to prove that the final coup-de-grace stroke is not far behind. When they do "save" us, everybody will be so thankful they will hardly notice how the event has forever enslaved us.

Maybe, or maybe it's just easy money. Write some trash book, make some trash movie, promote the hell out of it and cash in.

Here are some cartoons I found:

http://www.anthroblogs.org/nomadicthoughts/archives/maya_cartoon.JPG

http://wishididntknow.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/MayanCalendarCartoon.jpg

http://www.cartoonstock.com/newscartoons/cartoonists/ghr/lowres/ghrn73l.jpg

SaxonPagan
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 07:11 PM
I'm not sure exactly when the Mayans came up with this 2012 prophecy but, given how long ago it must have been, I'd say it was pretty accurate and I don't think they'll ultimately be too far out ;)

Scario
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 07:14 PM
I always looked at it as their calendar ended, nothing more. Just like our 2011 calendar ends on December 31, 2011. Doesn't mean the world ends December 31, 2011.

The Horned God
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 07:22 PM
After existing for 4 billion years the claim that the world will end on the 31st of December 2012 is certainly an extraordinary one.

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. I don't see any reason to suppose that the Maya, skilled sky watchers though they were, could predict astronomical the events 500 years in advance better than our scientists can predict those events a mere 1 year in advance.

If there was some large body such as a comet or Kuiper belt object on a collision course with earth (as seems to be the implication) and due to hit us a year from now said object would have to be well within the orbit of Saturn already. I think any such object would have been spotted by now.

Anything smaller than a comet, such as an asteroid would not have been visible to the Mayans and so could not have been incorporated into their predictions.

Þoreiðar
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 07:50 PM
If there was some large body such as a comet or Kuiper belt object on a collision course with earth (as seems to be the implication) and due to hit us a year from now said object would have to be well within the orbit of Saturn already. I think any such object would have been spotted by now.That is all well and good, but what about gamma ray bursts, solar storms and polar shifts? I don't think modern astronomers have any means to predict such events. And neither did the Mayans, either, by all reason. But just maybe...

The Horned God
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 08:17 PM
That is all well and good, but what about gamma ray bursts, solar storms and polar shifts? I don't think modern astronomers have any means to predict such events. And neither did the Mayans, either, by all reason. But just maybe...

Well, the first Gamma ray burst the Mayans observed would certainly also have been the last.. However supposing there was some cataclysmic phenomenon recurring with an ultra long periodic cycle that can only be detected by hundreds of years of continuous observation. In that case why wouldn't that phenomenom have been detected by any of the other long lived civilisations, such as the Chinese, the Egyptians, or the Babylonians etc?

The most likely explanation is that whatever the Mayans had envisioned for 2012 was based more upon metaphysical religious ideas of the kind that feature strongly in all ancient cultures (and many contemporary ones) rather than upon anything the modern mind would regard as scientific investigation.

Thusnelda
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 08:19 PM
I can´t understand the hype. :| Why so much focus on an old prophecy of an old tropical collective of people who were so "advanced" that they went extinct centuries before their own prophecy takes place? :P It weren´t even the "evil" Europeans who made them go extinct but themselves by war and Hungersnot. Why do we give them so much credit?

We all know that the worlds ends with Ragnarök, so stop being heretical! :D

Guinevere
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 08:34 PM
Yup, we are all doomed because the Mayans ended their calender on this date due to it being the end of a cycle (btw-it's been proven that their calendar is just a tad bit off anyways ;)). I find it amazing how people actually believe that people from such a long ago time could actually predict such a thing, it's actually a bit hilarious.. Lets take a moment to think about other never occurring predictions, shall we? Yes.. We're obviously doomed since the Mayans never claimed that the end of this cycle meant the end of the world, their beliefs about the new cycle after this one are actually thought by many scholars to have been a positive one.

We're also doomed because of the fact that not much is known about the Mayan's 'ancient writings', etc because Spanish conquistadors burned most of what they wrote, which may have even included other calendars as well. Not to mention the Mayans didn't believe in true death (spiritual)/there being an end to anything. People can feed into the history channel's crap shows about the end of the world that they broadcast for $$$$ if they wish though. The fascination (almost hope) some people have of there being a future annihilation of the world and life as we know it is to say the least odd..

Mööv
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 08:43 PM
I can´t understand the hype. :| Why so much focus on an old prophecy of an old tropical collective of people who were so "advanced" that they went extinct centuries before their own prophecy takes place?

It wasn't even a prophecy. It just happens the calendar was built up to that date. They probably thought - oh well, if we survive until that day will make another one until the year 4500. :D
It's just like certain cultures didn't have a way to wright big numbers because they didn't use them and didn't have a need for them at the time.

Elfriede
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 08:58 PM
I think that "end-of-the-world" prophecies will continue to freak people out for as long as humans exist. I recall that in 1999 a lot of people seriously bought into the fact that Nostradamus supposedly predicted that the world would end in 2000. And just this year some fundamental Christian lunatic predicted that the world would end in October. Neither of those things happened and I'm sure that in 10 or so years there will be a new "end-of-the-world" scenario for us to contemplate.

Besides, I don't know much about the Mayan 2012 thing but I'm not totally sure that it's supposed to be a "world ending" event... more like a "world changing" event. But "world ending" is more exciting :thumbup

Fredericus Rex
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 09:01 PM
If the Mayans were still around, they'd be laughing at all the New Age idiots who go along with this crap.

Mööv
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 09:04 PM
I recall that in 1999 a lot of people seriously bought into the fact that Nostradamus supposedly predicted that the world would end in 2000.

Yes that was a fun event. A lot of people were digging in making nuclear proof bunkers and stashing them with supplies. I remember reading an article in the press back then involving Michael Jackson making a huge stockpile of rations in his bunker.
If nothing else, at least will have a good laugh at other people acting like a horde of brainless consumers. :D

Huginn ok Muninn
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 09:16 PM
I can´t understand the hype. :| Why so much focus on an old prophecy of an old tropical collective of people who were so "advanced" that they went extinct centuries before their own prophecy takes place? :P It weren´t even the "evil" Europeans who made them go extinct but themselves by war and Hungersnot. Why do we give them so much credit?

We all know that the worlds ends with Ragnarök, so stop being heretical! :D

They aren't really extinct... I see them swarming all over the place here. :|

Æmeric
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 09:23 PM
I'm not sure exactly when the Mayans came up with this 2012 prophecy but, given how long ago it must have been, I'd say it was pretty accurate and I don't think they'll ultimately be too far out ;)


I can´t understand the hype. :| Why so much focus on an old prophecy of an old tropical collective of people who were so "advanced" that they went extinct centuries before their own prophecy takes place? :P It weren´t even the "evil" Europeans who made them go extinct but themselves by war and Hungersnot. Why do we give them so much credit?

I don't think the Mayans predicted the end of the world in 2012. It seems to be the interpretation of some New Agers because the calender ends on that date.


I always looked at it as their calendar ended, nothing more. Just like our 2011 calendar ends on December 31, 2011. Doesn't mean the world ends December 31, 2011.That what I think the end of their calender means. Either that or they ran out of space on the calender rock.;)

Some New Agers are influential & I suspect some of the ruling elites are New Agers, so even if it is nothing more then the end of a cosmic cycle with no special significance we could be affected by the reactions of certain persons who opinions matter. As for myself I have no plans to cash out the kid's college funds & head to Vegas.

As December 21, 2012 approaches I expect the same hoopla that surrounded the Y2K hysteria.

Sven
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 09:56 PM
I can´t understand the hype. :| Why so much focus on an old prophecy of an old tropical collective of people who were so "advanced" that they went extinct centuries before their own prophecy takes place? :P It weren´t even the "evil" Europeans who made them go extinct but themselves by war and Hungersnot. Why do we give them so much credit?

We all know that the worlds ends with Ragnarök, so stop being heretical! :D

I never understood why these civilizations are commonly refered to as "Hochkulturen" over here when their achievments were actually pretty marginal. Ancient Egypt and Greece certainly qualify as such but I wouldn't apply the term to the any of the South American civilizations.

Elessar
Wednesday, December 21st, 2011, 10:16 PM
Whatever the circumstances may be, we live in unprecedentedly bad times. I highly doubt the would will suddenly end next year or that we're all going to die, but our Earth is undergoing great natural, cosmological, and human shifts. We are most definitely on the brink of a new age (not in the trendy sense), whether it be benevolent or malevolent isn't the point. What matters is to defy the degenerate ruling order and promote righteousness and Tradition, lest you become a tool. We must remember that there is nothing more timely than the timeless. The sun is at the peak of a solar activity, predicted to climax at the end of 2012, wars and rumors of wars plague society, insert whatever end-time symptom, it applies.
My parents recently visited the Yucatan peninsula, and they say they get very angry when non-natives think their myths and calendars are harbingers of the apocalypse. Human consciousness and history travels in cycles, most similarly in India with the Yugas detailed in the Vedas, and is reflected in the Germanic myths, which is anything but New Age nonsense that you see in the bookstores. That and Biblical prophecy is shockingly apparent.

http://blogs.fullorissa.com/wp-content/Yugas.png
(We are here)

Now I would recommend you to read this, this pertains to us. A concise explanation of Modernity

In relation to rulers

Rulers will become unreasonable: they will levy taxes unfairly.
Rulers will no longer see it as their duty to promote spirituality, or to protect their subjects: they will become a danger to the world.
People will start migrating, seeking countries where wheat and barley form the staple food source.
"At the end of Kali-yuga, when there exist no topics on the subject of God, even at the residences of so-called saints and respectable gentlemen of the three higher varnas [castes], and when the power of government is transferred to the hands of ministers elected from the lowborn Shudra class or those less than them, and when nothing is known of the techniques of sacrifice, even by word, at that time the Lord will appear as the supreme chastiser." (Srimad-Bhagavatam (2.7.38))

In human relationships

Avarice and wrath will be common. Humans will openly display animosity towards each other. Ignorance of dharma will occur.
People will have thoughts of murder with no justification and will see nothing wrong in that.
Lust will be viewed as socially acceptable and sexual intercourse will be seen as the central requirement of life.
Sin will increase exponentially, whilst virtue will fade and cease to flourish.
People will take vows and break them soon after.
People will become addicted to intoxicating drinks and drugs.
Gurus will no longer be respected and their students will attempt to injure them. Their teachings will be insulted, and followers of Kama will wrest control of the mind from all human beings. Brahmins will not be learned or honoured, Kshatriyas will not be brave, Vaishyas will not be just in their dealings, Shudras will be given jobs they are not qualified for.



But I would hope we don't all die, a lot of my favorite bands have albums coming out in 2012 :(

Thusnelda
Thursday, December 22nd, 2011, 03:33 PM
They aren't really extinct... I see them swarming all over the place here. :|
Then it´s time to make their prophecy true...just for them. ;)

Seriously, aren´t the Mestizos of the USA not just a mix of several tribes (not only former Mayas), plus some more or less Spaniard contributions?

Vectis
Thursday, December 22nd, 2011, 03:44 PM
Then it´s time to make their prophecy true...just for them. ;)

Seriously, aren´t the Mestizos of the USA not just a mix of several tribes (not only former Mayas), plus some more or less Spaniard contributions?

The Mestizos are a mix of various tribes, negroes and euro blood, the pure Mayans died out hundreds of years ago.



Most studies have shown a European contribution of somewhere between 40-60% and an Amerindian contribution of 40-60%, and an African contribution of 1-5%. Basing an average from admixture levels found in many studies, the European contribution is ~50% and the Amerindian contribution is ~50% in a dual (European-Amerindian) model. A triracial (European-Amerindian-African) model yields an African contribution of ~2.5%, with average European and Amerindian contributions a small amount lower than 50% each.

According to a paper presented by the American Society of Human Genetics Mexicans were found to be 58.96% European, 36.05% "Asian" (Amerindian), and 5.03% African. Sonora shows the highest European contribution (70.63%) and Guerrero the lowest (51.98%). In Guerrero one also observes the highest Asian contribution (37.17%). African contribution ranges from 2.8% in Sonora to 11.13% in Veracruz. 80% of the Mexican population was classed as mestizo (meaning being racially mixed in some degree).

Another study, one focusing on the general population in five Latin American nations — Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Mexico, and Puerto Rico, — estimated that about half (50.1%) of Mexican ancestry was of Amerindian origin; 44.3%, European; and 5.6%, African. Compared to the other Latin American countries, Mexico was found to have the smallest amount of African admixture and the second largest amount of Amerindian ancestry, topped by Ecuador.

A paper specifically focusing on Mexican mestizos, has found them to be mostly Amerindian (55.2%) but also having a large amount of European admixture (41.8%). African ancestry was found to be 1.8% and East Asian ancestry, 1.2%. The samples were drawn from six Mexican cities: Sonora and Zacatecas (ZAC) in the north, Guanajuato in the center, Guerrero in the center–Pacific, Veracruz in the center–Gulf, and Yucatan in the southeast. As to reginal differences, it was found that Guerrero had the largest degree of both Amerindian and African admixture (66% and 4.1% respectively), and Sonora, the largest degree of European ancestry (61.6%).

Æmeric
Friday, December 23rd, 2011, 02:53 AM
Then it´s time to make their prophecy true...just for them. ;)

Seriously, aren´t the Mestizos of the USA not just a mix of several tribes (not only former Mayas), plus some more or less Spaniard contributions?

The Mayans lived mainly in what is now Guatemale & the Yucatan & Chiapas regions of Mexico;


http://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=109988&stc=1&d=1324608116

This region is still very heavily Amerindian.

The majority of Mexicans (Mestizos & Amerindians) are descended from Nahautl (Uto-Aztecans) & Zapotecs who lived lived in the fertile volcanic highlands of central & southcentral Mexico, west & northwest of the Tehuantepec Isthmus.

Bo
Friday, December 23rd, 2011, 07:57 PM
I think that "end-of-the-world" prophecies will continue to freak people out for as long as humans exist. I recall that in 1999 a lot of people seriously bought into the fact that Nostradamus supposedly predicted that the world would end in 2000. And just this year some fundamental Christian lunatic predicted that the world would end in October. Neither of those things happened and I'm sure that in 10 or so years there will be a new "end-of-the-world" scenario for us to contemplate.

Besides, I don't know much about the Mayan 2012 thing but I'm not totally sure that it's supposed to be a "world ending" event... more like a "world changing" event. But "world ending" is more exciting :thumbup

I don't know if I believe an apocalypse is in the works for 2012, but perhaps it's what the world needs. As odd as it may sound to some folks, there is a part of me that secretly hopes it comes to pass. Maybe there will be a small number of survivors that can set things right in the aftermath.

Whatever happens (or doesn't) next year, people will continue to find any number or variation of cataclysm scenarios to doomsay about.

Ralf
Friday, December 23rd, 2011, 10:55 PM
My Prophesy for 2012 is that the ruling Elite, call them Illuminati if you wish, I call them Jews, they have been pushing this 2012 end of the world Mayan calender business down our throats so that people are now expecting something to happen, something written in the stars that is beyond the control of man.

Whereas in reality, if something does happen, and I believe it will, it wont be destiny or some such mambo-jumbo, it will be the usual suspects up to more of their false flag events, except this time, instead of blaming Muslims, they will spread their palms and say, "no, its wasn't us that started world war 3, collapsed the worlds economy, released a man-made deadly flu, etc, etc, it was written in the stars".

As lucky for them as the holohoax, the result of world wide disorder in 2012 will be the opportunity to implement their global dictatorship, their "New World Order" as the only hope for mankind.



Then, the pre-written prophesies will start to occur, namely the book of Revelation which foretells such a global government, and that it would be ruled from Jerusalem, and that God would only allow it to remain for 42 months.

You then have Jesus reign for 1000 years so I dont think the worlds going to end next year, though it probably will seem that way to a lot of people.

Hammish
Friday, December 23rd, 2011, 11:26 PM
Then it´s time to make their prophecy true...just for them. ;)

Seriously, aren´t the Mestizos of the USA not just a mix of several tribes (not only former Mayas), plus some more or less Spaniard contributions?

Where I live in the US there's both kinds, the Mestizos will look anything from almost white and European, to very dark and almost no European influence.

But there are full blood Amerind from Mexico here to and there's no mistaking them.

I spent a year in rural Mexico back in the 1990's and what struck me about the place was how the full bloods and Mestizos don't get along.

I was up in the mountains in central Mexico in this one place and all the Indians lived in one town and all the Mexicans in another, only they where right next to each other, separated by a small stream.

To me it looked like one town with a stream running through it, but each town had it's own name and separate government.

You could throw a rock from one town to the other but these people basically didn't have anything to do with the other. The all wore different types of clothes too.

Atali
Tuesday, January 10th, 2012, 05:30 AM
So, as far back as I can remember 2012 has always been debated upon. I'm pretty indifferent and I think probably nothing will happen.
What is your take on it? I'm interested in hearing everyone's ideas :)
PS~ If you like these silly shows, you might find this interesting:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCISb6BescE&feature=related

Ediruc
Tuesday, January 10th, 2012, 05:37 AM
I think its bullsh*t. No need to get into detail since I've made previous posts as to why I think so.

Angus
Tuesday, January 10th, 2012, 05:44 AM
Ok I'm a bit tired and got a little dyslexic on the title lol
So, as far back as I can remember 2012 has always been debated upon. I'm pretty indifferent and I think probably nothing will happen.
What is your take on it? I'm interested in hearing everyone's ideas :)
PS~ If you like these silly shows, you might find this interesting:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCISb6BescE&feature=related

I don't think the world is going to be frozen over any time soon. So, until then I'm not going to worry about it.

From another perspective, this is all based on the Mayan calender. Calenders don't just go on and on forever, there has to be stopping point.

Scario
Tuesday, January 10th, 2012, 06:24 AM
I agree with Olav. My 2011 Calendar stopped at December 31st. World didn't end. No transcendence to another plane of existence. I just need to go out and get a new calendar.