PDA

View Full Version : How Do You Feel About "Internet Writing"?



mischak
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 12:13 AM
How do you feel about the usage of "proper" punctuation and writing on the internet?

I'm a bit more casual when emailing friends or talking on IM, but on forums and other non lowbrow settings I really cringe when I read text that does not use proper spacing, proper use of periods, constant use of inappropriate capitalization, etc. Almost everyone is prone to making a mistake here and there, but you learn these basic rules of writing when you're in elementary school, so there's really no excuse having your text practically unreadable. I also have to admit, even though I try to look past all the errors and decipher the actual point of the text, I usually just end up not taking people seriously who....decide to,t ype like this andnot crrect it..

SouthernBoy
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 12:14 AM
lol, it bothers me 2

Siebenbürgerin
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 12:51 AM
I try to write as correctly as I can. I used to make a mistake writing common nouns in capitals in English because of being used to it in German. Someone mentioned it to me and I realized it so I started paying more attention and putting only the proper nouns and country/ethnic adjectives in capitals. :) "SMS" talk bothers me as well. It's a forum, not a chat window and the discussions remain readable here. Plus in my view too many "SMS" posts can make the forum look like a "white trash" forum with uneducated people. :(

Hrodnand
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 01:13 AM
I try to write as correctly as I can. I used to make a mistake writing common nouns in capitals in English because of being used to it in German. Someone mentioned it to me and I realized it so I started paying more attention and putting only the proper nouns and country/ethnic adjectives in capitals. :) "SMS" talk bothers me as well. It's a forum, not a chat window and the discussions remain readable here. Plus in my view too many "SMS" posts can make the forum look like a "white trash" forum with uneducated people. :(

That is true, there are many posts that are like messages in a chat room.:rolleyes: If one has nothing important to say that would contribute to the topics, than that person should restrain from writing nonsense trash.

I am trying as much as I can to avoid grammar mistakes, though sometimes I fail too.:o
However I am trying to avoid chat/internet slang, or whatever they call it, phrasings like: "cuz", "U r ...", "thx", "k", "s up?"etc. :rolleyes:
Not that I would care about those who are using it in a chatroom for instance, but on a forum like this, I think we should try to show some honour to the "spirit of the board" by avoiding slang language.

Æmeric
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 01:22 AM
It bothers me, but I know I don't always use correct punctuation, spelling etc..., though sometimes that is just the result of typos. In my real life I have an assistance who checks any work related emails or reports I type for mistakes. The automated software programs that check for spelling & punctuation are annoying. Btw now that you bring it up, shouldn't it be Mischak not mischak.:)

SwordOfTheVistula
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 03:21 AM
Yeah, it's annoying. The only thing that trips me up is that I usually check for typos after hitting submit, and most forums don't let you edit titles.

Deary
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 04:04 AM
On another forum I was at, much more low-brow than this one, people who regularly typed in a sloppy manner were warned to clean it up or get out (unless they were dyslexic) :D

By the way, does anyone else not have spellcheck? It hasn't been working for me for a while now.

Mrs. Lyfing
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 04:11 AM
It's a forum, not a chat window and the discussions remain readable here. Plus in my view too many "SMS" posts can make the forum look like a "white trash" forum with uneducated people. :(

I really haven't seen many SMS messages here? Besides maybe an lol every once in a while. I use to get ( haven't in a while ) lots of rep for my errors. :D but, hey I do my best. <<< ( haha huh ) ( that I noticed after I posted so now here I am in edit thinking ..." oh *hit, let me edit but I change my mind and say, It stays! " ) :)

I am not sure my view of someone using SMS necessarily makes them white trash or uneducated. Tho at the same time I don't think its proper really for a forum. SMS is due to cell phones, texts and chat, thanks to all the electronics we " apparently " must have these days to survive. :rolleyes: Maybe some are confused as to where SMS is proper due to that fact that it has become the " in " thing.

Also, I find " what someone says " to be more important than how they write it. ;)

Svartljos
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 05:18 AM
Hm, well generally on forums I try to write somewhat well, although it's not as though I'm writing a paper. Generally while instant messaging I write with correct syntax and spelling, I just might not use uppercase letters. I normally find all that "IM speak" really annoying to read :rolleyes:, especially when I have to decipher something weird.

Maelstrom
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 05:42 AM
Pisses me off almost as much as so called "American English" and their usage of Zee's (it's obviously a Zed).

OneEnglishNorman
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 08:17 AM
Casual and careless behaviour is now acceptable in all walks of life, from how we talk, dress, our manners around other people, how we address by others by their first name instead of their surname. It's part of democratic, anti-elitist society to venerate plebeian behaviour and to be childish.

BTW I noticed maybe 0.25&#37; of people here on this forum start sentences like, "i noticed that.i dont"

Etc etc.

Psychonaut
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 08:27 AM
BTW I noticed maybe 0.25% of people here on this forum start sentences like, "i noticed that.i dont"


This is one of the reasons I love this board so much. The level of discussion is only made possible by an equally high level of communication, which is amazing seeing as we have so many folks for whom English is a second (or third) language. Highbrow is the only way to go.

Þórir
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 08:47 AM
With chatrooms I'm talking to someone in real time and writing as fast as I can. I'm not so concerned with spelling and grammar there. Elsewhere I'm a stickler for it. Its also easy when the message form automatically underlines misspelled words, like in this forum.

Fortis_in_Arduis
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 09:33 AM
I try very hard to ensure that I use the correct spelling, grammar and punctuation. I am not sure how successful this is though.

I also avoid using contractions such as "I've". I will write "I have", instead. This was drummed into me at school, and it stuck.

I try to avoid making any ambiguous statements where the object is unclear.

I noticed that Siebenburgerin had a problem with wrong capitalization. Thank you for correcting it. It is amazing that there are so many people on this forum with so many different ways of speaking English.

Having the written English standards that we have makes it possible for us to communicate on the basis of our meaning, rather than the way we say it. Nuances have to be explicit rather than implicit and I prefer that. There is still opportunity for nuance.

There are also spelling controversies. In the UK we can choose between the Oxford English Dictionary spellings and the Chambers Dictionary spellings, which is more of a Cambridge phenomenon. I prefer Chambers, so I will use a 'z' instead of an 's', in words like 'criminalize', although I do not always remember. I think that it is clearer to use a 'z'.

Blood_Axis
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 09:41 AM
WTF KK LOL :D

When people don't capitalize the first letter of a sentence, when they don't use punctuation marks, etc...
It's like nails on a chalkboard, it makes my eyes hurt. I usually edit my posts as many times as required in order to insert forgotten commas or correct a minor typo...etc.

I don't see why writing on the internet should be any less perfect than an essay. I mean, it's not a note that you stick on your refrigerator door, the fact that other people are reading it makes it formal enough ;)

BeornWulfWer
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 10:24 AM
It doesn't really bother me that greatly. Aslong as the writing is reasonably intelligible and makes sense; then it is Ok by me.

Hanna
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 10:45 AM
Pisses me off almost as much as so called "American English" and their usage of Zee's (it's obviously a Zed).

I 'm always annoyed when people write '' that '' instead of '' which '' it must be American English versus British English.:)

CrystalRose
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 10:56 AM
I voted: Don't mind, don't care. :D
This comes as no surprize/surprise.

Life's too short. When I die (knock on wood), i'm not going to kick myself where the sun doesn't shine because some english major's panties get in a bunch because I misplace a comma. (After one too many beers.;)) I'd rather die on a mountain with a view than sit here editing other people and their opinions. The time wasted on making yourself appear perfect could be spent on more important things.
As long as they get their point across I don't see a problem.

We’re all magnificent regardless of what we type, say or do. My time here is precious but only a piece of the pie. Doesn’t define who I am as a person.

Someone edit me..

Thusnelda
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 12:35 PM
Well, I think at least everyone with English as a native language can see my constant problems with English grammar! :D As I said in the past: I&#180;ve not the best talent for English but I try my best to improve. And I improved in the last few years, anyway.
An other visible problem of me are the commatas. In German we use quite often commatas but I&#180;m always unsure if a comma is needed in this or that English sentence - or not. :o So I guess I use commatas sometimes too often, and sometimes too less!? *sighs*

But I hope people can see my efforts to write good and understandable English. I make passages for the clarity and such, too.

SwordOfTheVistula
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 01:25 PM
There are also spelling controversies. In the UK we can choose between the Oxford English Dictionary spellings and the Chambers Dictionary spellings, which is more of a Cambridge phenomenon. I prefer Chambers, so I will use a 'z' instead of an 's', in words like 'criminalize', although I do not always remember. I think that it is clearer to use a 'z'.

That's also the standard in the US to use 'z' for such words, that is interesting that there is a controversy in the UK over different spelling of words.


Tho at the same time I don't think its proper really for a forum.

Siebenbürgerin
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 04:41 PM
I am not sure my view of someone using SMS necessarily makes them white trash or uneducated.
It doesn't make them necessarily, but it makes them look like it, i.e. it gives the impression. It's also very difficult to read if people don't punctuate and capitalise the beginning of their setences. You lose track where it starts and where it ends. The eyes hurt.


Also, I find " what someone says " to be more important than how they write it. ;)
I find both important. It only takes a press of the shift to capitalise the beginning of a sentence and a press of the period key to place a period at the end. People who don't do this strike me as either careless or lazy, so it doesn't help to form me a good opinion about them, personally.

Gorm the Old
Sunday, August 10th, 2008, 05:04 PM
I have always made typographical errors because I am, at best, an inexpert typist. Now, age, carpal tunnel syndrome, and arthritis have so increased the abundance of such errors that, in the interest of comprehensibility, it has become essential for me to proof-read and correct my typescript before submitting it.

Slovenliness, whether in speech, writing, or dress, makes an unfavourable impression. [N.B., however, contractions such as "I've", "can't", etc. have been in use for centuries. Certainly in American English, they are quite acceptable (not "ain't", though; that's a no-no) ] There is no excuse for typing such perverse English (perhaps related to Ebonics ? ) as "i cudn't C why U didn't think that was kewl."

Considering how many versions of the English language there are, it is to be expected that there will be regional differences of orthography and perhaps punctuation . It is unreasonable to expect Americans or South Africans to use the orthography of the OED (much though I revere it as the most authoritative dictionary of the English language).

Someone inquired whether anyone else does not use SpellCheck. Yes, I, for two reasons: SpellCheck has too limited a vocabulary and I do not need it.
There are very few words in the English language which I cannot spell correctly. If you detect an error in spelling in anything I have written, you may be quite certain that it is a typographical error.

I refuse to go along with slovenly spelling, grammar, syntax and punctuation, just because they are common and popular. I am not "in with the in-crowd". Call me pedantic, if you will, but there are right and wrong ways to do things.

aquitanos
Saturday, August 16th, 2008, 12:33 AM
I can brush off most things mentioned on here - but when I [rarely] come across "PeOpLe tYpInG lyKe dIs"....... :mad: I did not think anyone still did that. I obviously do not take those people/posts seriously but its just very harsh to look at, let alone try to decipher.






There are also spelling controversies. In the UK we can choose between the Oxford English Dictionary spellings and the Chambers Dictionary spellings, which is more of a Cambridge phenomenon. I prefer Chambers, so I will use a 'z' instead of an 's', in words like 'criminalize', although I do not always remember. I think that it is clearer to use a 'z'.


In grade school a teacher would give me points off my papers because I used to use the "s", would type centre or theatre, and would throw in the "u" in words such as "favourite", and "colour" - instead of writing things in the American English way.
I still catch myself doing it - but usually correct it.

Fortis_in_Arduis
Sunday, August 17th, 2008, 11:35 AM
In grade school a teacher would give me points off my papers because I used to use the "s", would type centre or theatre, and would throw in the "u" in words such as "favourite", and "colour" - instead of writing things in the American English way.
I still catch myself doing it - but usually correct it.

No, no, use the English-English way, and use the 's' if you want, or just write what you want.

I choose 'z' over 's' and that is allowed in English-English, but why deny yourself the pleasure of your favOURite spellings? You will only be harbOURing the desire to use them. :p

Vindefense
Thursday, February 19th, 2009, 02:00 AM
The way I see it language is a direct reflection of culture. Both the written and the spoken. When I view message boards and the individuals on these boards either have nothing to say or are careless or vulgar in their posts I, find it disturbing. The trend I see, especially among the younger generations, is the way they are actually starting to speak the same way they type. To me this is a sad reflection of the state that our culture is in. I am also noticing the trend in schools now to use reading materials which propagate this trend as well. It seems ridiculous to me that I have to point this out to my young son. But I do.

I find it important to keep a high level of sophistication in both my writing and conversation. I also type with two hands, which makes it very easy for me. Ha, one thing in school that was worth learning.:thumbup Also, since these posts are forever, and in the event my posts are ever held against me, at least I'll appear somewhat intelligent. ;)

Nachtengel
Thursday, February 19th, 2009, 02:55 AM
Honestly? If I see someone habitually writing like that, the first thing I can think of is "retard". :shrug

Dreyrithoka
Thursday, February 19th, 2009, 03:23 AM
I started as a mere Grammar Nazi, then I progressed to become an Early Modern English Grammar Enforcer, a title which hath earned me countless bans from most varied fora. Luckily for most, herein I merely lurk often and post when moved to do so, and thus leave mine notions to myself unless severely agitated by some calamity.

Dagna
Friday, February 20th, 2009, 05:02 AM
It makes me cringe and when I see my countrymen writing in such a lowbrow manner and I feel ashamed. I see more native English speakers writing "your right" and "their is" than foreign speakers. I wonder what Europeans think when they see that. Those illiterates are responsible for the distorted image of Americans Europeans have, that we are "uneducated, ignorant rednecks/yankees".

SwordOfTheVistula
Friday, February 20th, 2009, 05:50 AM
It makes me cringe and when I see my countrymen writing in such a lowbrow manner and I feel ashamed. I see more native English speakers writing "your right" and "their is" than foreign speakers. I wonder what Europeans think when they see that. Those illiterates are responsible for the distorted image of Americans Europeans have, that we are "uneducated, ignorant rednecks/yankees".

True. Though, honestly, British people are by far the worst culprits when it comes to spelling & grammar problems.

Bärin
Friday, February 20th, 2009, 11:03 AM
Some of the native English speakers should learn the German sense of order and tidiness. If you're too lazy to capitalize the beginning of a sentence, then what about us Germans who have to write all nouns with capitals?

Writing disorderly is raping your native language. It shows you have no respect for it.

Thusnelda
Friday, February 20th, 2009, 04:09 PM
Waz up? Inet writing iz teh fail!!111oneoneone! :D *g*

Seriously, I dilike internet writing and internet slang. For me it´s very similar to this typical SMS-like messages. Sure, sometimes I love things like "catspeek" (Hi Blood Axis! ;) ), but not as a general style of writing.

Nachtengel
Tuesday, April 14th, 2009, 10:25 PM
It makes me cringe and when I see my countrymen writing in such a lowbrow manner and I feel ashamed. I see more native English speakers writing "your right" and "their is" than foreign speakers. I wonder what Europeans think when they see that. Those illiterates are responsible for the distorted image of Americans Europeans have, that we are "uneducated, ignorant rednecks/yankees".
When I see Americans who can't spell, I wonder how would they perform in a foreign language and I can't imagine too well. It doesn't surprise me so few speak anything other than "English". No offense. I know there are Americans who spell properly.

Matrix
Sunday, June 28th, 2009, 11:22 PM
It's annoying on forums. SMS talk is supposed to be for short messages, not long posts. No punctuation makes it hard to follow what someone's saying. I'm not bothered by bad spelling and grammar on the other hand, as long as it's readable. Not as mine is perfect either, it's a foreign language after all.

Bärin
Sunday, June 28th, 2009, 11:28 PM
I'm not bothered by bad spelling and grammar on the other hand, as long as it's readable. Not as mine is perfect either, it's a foreign language after all.
Yes as long as it's a foreign language. But what about when it's the native language? It's embarrassing and a shame to the heritage, as I said, like raping the language, not to capitalize the noun in German for example and other catastrophic errors. I see it on Thiazi and other German forums all the time. Thanks so much, contemporary culture. :thumbdown

Siebenbürgerin
Monday, June 29th, 2009, 02:51 PM
We've to differentiate between grammar and spelling mistakes and poor writing style. Punctuation exists in our native languages too, and it's careless not to use it at least to end a sentence. If someone writes a long paragraph without any punctuation, it's very annoying to the eyes of the readers. If we wrote like that at an examination, we wouldn't get graded, because the teacher was too annoyed to read more than a page without punctuation. Punctuationless writing also feels a little bit emotionless. Punctuation serves purposes, one to point the emotions of the writer. An exclamation mark, a question mark, and so forth. ;)

Sissi
Saturday, December 4th, 2010, 08:14 PM
As I said in a previous post - why I don't make so many posts at a time - I take some time to verify the spelling and punctuation, but also the vocabulary in my posts. My English isn't perfect, but the way we write our posts is presentable and counts to the image.

Correct spelling and punctuating is expected from all languages, as people have said already. Many reasons have been enumerated already so I won't go deep into it. In a nutshell, we should be presentable. There is nothing to lose by it, yet a lot of potential gain. :)

Aside from formatting, I think there's another point which counts a lot: decent language. I won't name names because I don't think it makes a point being specific here, but I know some boards where their users frequently swear like sailors and this is offputting to many people. If it's not something you'd say around youngsters, then it's better reworded.

Naturally, the occasional swear word used to express frustration is alright, but when it's a recurring part of people's daily vocabulary, it can be annoying and affect the seriousness the person receives.

P.S.: My point is not about dyslexics of course, which could be understood and excused from my perspective at least, although it's easy to use it as an excuse these days, especially by minorities.

Also apologies if I've repeated some - too many? - things said already, as it seems most people are on the same page concerning this topic. :thumbsup

Hilderinc
Saturday, December 4th, 2010, 10:38 PM
When ever I see someone using 'text speak' or 'internet writing' I picture, in my mind, a respectable and intelligent adult or elder writing or even talking like that, and it just does not compute, I cannot see them ever writing or even thinking like that. I don't understand how unintelligent and degenerate you must be in order to actively try to make your grammar and spelling unable to be easily read.

Of course, there are some things that cannot be expressed over the internet and the occasional smiley face or 'lol' hasn't killed anyone.

Meister
Wednesday, January 19th, 2011, 03:02 PM
When chatting on msn etc, I think you can be relaxed.

When posting on forums especially when you are wanting to make a serious point, I think it makes people look like clowns and I can't the seriously.

For eg:

I wish th jews wd stp w all ths crp abt th hc. It ws a lng tme ago gt ovr it.


Regardless of how much I agree with the post, I can't take it seriously when it is written like that.

Sindig_og_stoisk
Monday, March 7th, 2011, 09:51 AM
I am a complete Fascist for correct spelling, punctuation, grammar and so forth. But I have studied English at university and expect ot become a teacher in it one day so I am expected to have an above-average grasp of these things.

In fact, I am so annoyed by sub-standard grammar and pronunciation in spoken dialogue that I actually have been known to interrrupt someone in the middle of a sentence in order to correct them.

On message boards, forums and such I will seriously ignore anyone not writing soundly and legible. Or at least make snide remarks about the links between linguistic and grammatical knowledge on one hand and general intelligence on the other.

And if I find a note or message lying around I will read it through to make sure it has sound spelling and grammar and if not, make corrections with a red pen.