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Richard
Wednesday, August 6th, 2008, 10:01 PM
Coroner rules on Wairarapa skull
Tuesday, 05 August 2008

A skull found on the banks of a Wairarapa river has turned out to be a European woman aged between 40 and 45 years, who died between 266 years ago and 302 years ago, says a coroner.

"This suggests that the deceased may have been alive somewhere in the South Wairarapa in or about 1742," said Masterton coroner John Kershaw.

The coroner noted in his findings that despite radiocarbon dating by GNS Science indicating the woman was alive in 1742, historians said the Wairarapa was not settled by Europeans until after the New Zealand Company sent settlers to Wellington a century later, in 1840.

The European discovery of New Zealand was by Abel Janszoon Tasman in December 1642, and history records the first two white women to arrive in New Zealand as Kathleen Hagerty, and Charlotte Edgar, two convicts who escaped from New South Wales and arrived on this side of the Tasman in 1806.

Mr Kershaw said there were few facts available.

Sam Tobin was walking his family dog when he found the skull in October 2004 on the banks of the Ruamahunga River, south east of Featherston.

"We know the deceased was possibly a European female and likely aged between 40 and 45 years," he said.

In 2005, GNS Science indicated a radiocarbon age between 296 years – plus or minus 34 years.

Two Auckland forensic pathologists Dr Rex Ferris and Dr Tim Koelmeyer said the skull was an adult female, but was not Maori, and was probably Caucasian.

A Wellington forensic pathologist, Dr Robin Watt, said the woman was probably of European origin, aged 40-45, but he could not discount the possibility of Maori ancestry.

Masterton archivist Gareth Winter said there were no European inhabitants in the area 300 years ago.

Abel Tasman only journeyed along the west coast of the country and did not land anywhere in the North Island. And there were no records of a ship missing in NZ waters during this period.

English explorer Captain James Cook, visited Cape Palliser early in 1770.

Mr Winter noted that whalers used to visit the Wairarapa coast, but records of their activities were very rare.

- NZPA

http://www.stuff.co.nz/4643203a11.html

lei.talk
Wednesday, August 13th, 2008, 01:07 PM
i purchased a box
of a beautiful and very interesting book (http://www.celticnz.co.nz/)

to sell in my book-store.

the shipping from new zealand
to southern california
cost more than the books!

not a profitable exercise - business-wise, but,
it did generate years of interesting conversation
in my book-store
and at my mensa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mensa_International) special-interest-group.

Crimson Guard
Thursday, August 14th, 2008, 06:19 AM
Its an interesting story, though maybe on the grim side if it does turn out to be a European woman, as how the heck did she arrive there. It could still be some Maori female, as they can appear somewhat Caucasoid upon improper first inspection. Female sailors is out and if there no records or other confirmed possibilities, perhaps some whalers or pirates kept a few female white slaves or possibly some remnant of a unknown wreck of Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch or British origin.

forkbeard
Saturday, December 6th, 2008, 09:46 AM
I think its a common myth that women were not welcome on ships. The old nautical saying "shake a leg" as in meaning to wake up, was to see if the person in a hammock was male or female. The women being allowed to sleep on.
Recently an excavation of a British ship lost in the "Battle of the Nile" showed up to half the people on board were women. Including babies, pregnant females and small children. In other words whole families came to sea with their men, even on war ships. The women often being used to repair sails, cook food etc. It is the same as the old barbarian practice of bringing ones loved ones to the battlefield in order to get the men to fight harder.

syd_saxon
Saturday, February 28th, 2009, 02:50 AM
someone could write a very interesting novel about this skulls origins, and fill in the blanks with some creativity..

Hyperboreanar
Tuesday, March 3rd, 2009, 07:47 PM
i purchased a box
of a beautiful and very interesting book (http://www.celticnz.co.nz/)

to sell in my book-store.

the shipping from new zealand
to southern california
cost more than the books!

not a profitable exercise - business-wise, but,
it did generate years of interesting conversation
in my book-store
and at my mensa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mensa_International) special-interest-group.

Yes, that certianly is a fantastic book. I have read bits of it online but :( it's too expensive to get it to UK.

The book is really good for it's maroi mythology which relates to a pre-maori race of white people.

The indigenous pre-Maori people were the Patupaiarehe, Turehu or Pake-pakeha meaning “moon-light pale skinned people'' - because they had white skin.

Hoani Nahe the Ngāti Maru Māori chief of the late 19th century wrote that:

“When the migration (of Māori) arrived they found people living in the land – Ngati Kura, Ngati Korakorako and Ngati Turehu, all hapu or sub-tribes of the people called Patupaiarehe (the pale skinned)…The dwelling places of these people were on the sharp peaks of the high mountains”


Also i was flicking through an old book i have and found this quote:

“Patupaiarehe were a much lighter complexion than the Maori; their hair was of a dull golden or reddish colour”.
-Fairy Folk Tales of the Maori, 1925 by James Cowan